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* WomanInWhite: Aredhel wears no other color.


* PhysicalHeaven: Valinor, the Western Blessed Realm of the Valar and Maiar. While no part of Arda can be wholly free of the corruption Morgoth forced into it, the Blessed Realm comes closest to what Eru intended Arda to be. There is no disease, no decay, no corruption or poison. Animals and plants there never age.[[labelnote:*]]Questions about how such an ecosystem could function [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief are best avoided.]][[/labelnote]]Everything is vastly more beautiful and lively than anything in Middle-Earth. Elves there can experience a world where everything they love ''doesn't'' age and die in a miniscule fraction of their lifespan. WordOfGod is that mortal Men would eventually find it unpleasant, however, and living there [[BodyHorror would]] [[WasOnceAMan not]] [[TheUndead end]] [[DrivenToSuicide well]]. Thus Men are banned from Valinor itself, by orders of Eru.

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* PhysicalHeaven: Valinor, the Western Blessed Realm of the Valar and Maiar. While no part of Arda can be wholly free of the corruption Morgoth forced into it, the Blessed Realm comes closest to what Eru intended Arda to be. There is no disease, no decay, no corruption or poison. Animals and plants there never age.[[labelnote:*]]Questions about how such an ecosystem could function [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief are best avoided.]][[/labelnote]]Everything ]][[/labelnote]] Everything is vastly more beautiful and lively than anything in Middle-Earth. Elves there can experience a world where everything they love ''doesn't'' age and die in a miniscule fraction of their lifespan. WordOfGod is that mortal Men would eventually find it unpleasant, however, and living there [[BodyHorror would]] [[WasOnceAMan not]] [[TheUndead end]] [[DrivenToSuicide well]]. Thus Men are banned from Valinor itself, by orders of Eru.


* PiecesOfGod:
** The primordial spirits (Ainur) were the ''offspring of Ilúvatar's thought'' and each was given understanding only of that part of the mind of Ilúvatar from which he or she came. The exception to this was Melkor.
** All elves and men have a spirit or soul (fëa) which comes from the Flame Imperishable of Ilúvatar. It is indestructible and grants the individual consciousness and free-will, but is utterly powerless without a body made of the physical matter of Arda.


%% * TheDragon: Several, including Sauron, Gothmog and Glaurung (literally).

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%% * TheDragon: Several, including Sauron, Morgoth has several beings that occupy high command positions. Sauron is the greatest and most trusted of his servants, Gothmog Lord of Balrogs is the general of his armies, and Glaurung (literally).the Father of Dragons serves as both strategist, manipulator and enforcer, particularly after Sauron's humiliation at Luthien and Huan's hands. All of whom serve as TheHeavy for one of Tolkien's Great Tales: Sauron in ''Beren and Luthien'', Glaurung for ''Literature/TheChildrenOfHurin'', and Gothmog for ''The Fall of Gondolin''.


* ChainedToARock / AndIMustScream: First Maedhros and then Húrin on Thangorodrim, after Morgoth gets a hold of them. For decades.

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%% * ChainedToARock / AndIMustScream: ChainedToARock: First Maedhros and then Húrin on Thangorodrim, after Morgoth gets a hold of them. For decades.decades.
* ChariotPulledByCats: When the Teleri (Sea Elves) of the Lonely Isle Eressea wanted to emigrate to Valinor, they travelled in ships pulled by large swans.



* CompellingVoice: Morgoth; Glaurung; Sauron.

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%% * CompellingVoice: Morgoth; Glaurung; Sauron.



* DarkIsEvil / DarkIsNotEvil: A frequent visual motif in the legendarium is darkness and shadow as a metaphor and literal tool of evil. However, it isn't without exceptions, for nothing was evil in its beginning, including the concept of darkness.
** Darkness as an evil motif:
*** Morgoth uses and abuses darkness, turning it from a harmless cozy nighttime thing into a terror and a weapon. He works in darkness, his servants (such as Orcs) fear and hate the Sun and Moon, he destroys light wherever he can (except the Silmarils, which he can't destroy and keeps as spoils).
*** Ungoliant, the horrific spider-shaped [[EldritchAbomination thing]] that crawled from the Void, devours all light and belches out webs of shadow darker-than-dark, shadows that are more than mere absence of light. With Morgoth, she destroys the holy Trees of Valinor.
*** Eöl, called "the Dark Elf," is the only individual Dark Elf to always be associated with literal darkness. He lives in the dark, hates and shuns sunlight, and is pretty evil at the end of the day. He's got fewer redeeming features than Fëanor.
*** Caranthir the Dark, Fëanor's fifth son. On one hand, he is only called "the Dark" because of his coloration, and is on the Noldor's side. On the other hand, he is a JerkAss who participates in the massacres of Elf by Elf, and who thinks the Sindar are inferior, and is a loud-mouthed bully even by Fëanorian standards. He does get a PetTheDog moment when he and his troops rescue the people of Haleth from Orcs, though even that is suspect. He conveniently shows up just after their leaders have been killed, and offers to basically let them be a buffer between his people and Morgoth, only he phrases it better. That Haleth immediately led her people away from him and to ''[[NobleBigot Thingol]]'' of all Elves makes you wonder.
** Darkness not as a sign of evil.
*** Túrin Turambar, a badass AntiHero DoomMagnet who was armed with a black sword and armor. [[EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette He also had black hair and pale skin.]]
*** Dark Elves, or ''Moriquendi''. They don't have jet black skin or live in the thrall of a ReligionOfEvil like the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' Dark Elves, they just never saw the light of the Two Trees and are thus "of darkness" and comparatively uneducated. As a whole, they have just as much potential to be evil or good as other Elves.
*** Mandos is essentially Tolkien's [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Hades]]. He's closely associated with death, but only as the caretaker and judge of dead souls. He's stern and unyielding, but just and entirely on the good side of things.
*** The elves are often mentioned to cherish nighttime, when the stars come out.

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* DarkIsEvil / DarkIsNotEvil: DarkIsEvil: A frequent visual motif in the legendarium is darkness and shadow as a metaphor and literal tool of evil. However, it isn't without exceptions, for nothing was evil in its beginning, including the concept of darkness.
**
darkness. Darkness as an evil motif:
*** ** Morgoth uses and abuses darkness, turning it from a harmless cozy nighttime thing into a terror and a weapon. He works in darkness, his servants (such as Orcs) fear and hate the Sun and Moon, he destroys light wherever he can (except the Silmarils, which he can't destroy and keeps as spoils).
*** ** Ungoliant, the horrific spider-shaped [[EldritchAbomination thing]] that crawled from the Void, devours all light and belches out webs of shadow darker-than-dark, shadows that are more than mere absence of light. With Morgoth, she destroys the holy Trees of Valinor.
*** ** Eöl, called "the Dark Elf," is the only individual Dark Elf to always be associated with literal darkness. He lives in the dark, hates and shuns sunlight, and is pretty evil at the end of the day. He's got fewer redeeming features than Fëanor.
*** ** Caranthir the Dark, Fëanor's fifth son. On one hand, he is only called "the Dark" because of his coloration, and is on the Noldor's side. On the other hand, he is a JerkAss who participates in the massacres of Elf by Elf, and who thinks the Sindar are inferior, and is a loud-mouthed bully even by Fëanorian standards. He does get a PetTheDog moment when he and his troops rescue the people of Haleth from Orcs, though even that is suspect. He conveniently shows up just after their leaders have been killed, and offers to basically let them be a buffer between his people and Morgoth, only he phrases it better. That Haleth immediately led her people away from him and to ''[[NobleBigot Thingol]]'' of all Elves makes you wonder.
** * DarkIsNotEvil: Darkness not as a sign of evil.
*** ** Túrin Turambar, a badass AntiHero DoomMagnet who was armed with a black sword and armor. [[EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette He also had black hair and pale skin.]]
*** ** Dark Elves, or ''Moriquendi''. They don't have jet black skin or live in the thrall of a ReligionOfEvil like the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' Dark Elves, they just never saw the light of the Two Trees and are thus "of darkness" and comparatively uneducated. As a whole, they have just as much potential to be evil or good as other Elves.
*** ** Mandos is essentially Tolkien's [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Hades]]. He's closely associated with death, but only as the caretaker and judge of dead souls. He's stern and unyielding, but just and entirely on the good side of things.
*** ** The elves are often mentioned to cherish nighttime, when the stars come out.



* DownerEnding: The endings that aren't bittersweet are this.
* TheDragon: Several, including Sauron, Gothmog and Glaurung (literally).

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%% * DownerEnding: The endings that aren't bittersweet are this.
%% * TheDragon: Several, including Sauron, Gothmog and Glaurung (literally).


* TheSociopath: If some characters would qualify, these would be:
** Morgoth would be a low functioning one, at least for a Valar. His impatience and pride are some of his biggest flaws.
** Sauron would be a high functioning one, capable of very long term planning and self-control.
** Glaurung is another example.

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*TheSociopath: If some characters would qualify, these would be:
**Morgoth would be a low functioning one, at least for a Valar. His impatience and pride are some of his biggest flaws.
**Sauron would be a high functioning one, capable of very long term planning and self-control.
**Glaurung is another example.


**For all the evil creature too. Melkor started as the mightiest of the Valar, and ended up the weakest, hateful and miserable of everything and everyone, but incapable of ever fulfilling his desire of destroying the world, and barred to the void until the end of the world (when he will die). Sauron ended up as a disembodied powerless spirit.
**Feanor is bounded to remain in Mandos until the end of days as penance for his crimes. All his sons end up dead too.
**The orcs are utterly miserable beings that hate themselves and everyone else.



* BigBadDuumvirate: Melkor and Ungoliant, at least during the Darkening of Valinor. This lasts just as long as you can expect an alliance between two evil, utterly selfish, {{Omnicidal Maniac}}s to last.

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* BigBadDuumvirate: Melkor Morgoth and Sauron for the entire Silmarillion. While Morgoth is the chief one, Sauron has too much influence in the story to be brushed aside.
**Melkor
and Ungoliant, at least during the Darkening of Valinor. This lasts just as long as you can expect an alliance between two evil, utterly selfish, {{Omnicidal Maniac}}s to last. While she is subservient to Melkor at the beginning, she rebels when she wins enough power and noticed Morgoth won't fulfill his part of the deal.

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* HateSink:
** [[TheUsurper Ar-Pharazon]] from the ''Akallabeth'' was the nephew of the King of Numenor, Tar-Palantir. When the king died, Ar-Pharazon [[VillainousIncest forced the king's daughter to marry him]], considered an act of great evil, and usurped the throne of Numenor. When Sauron declared himself King of Men, Ar-Pharazon took it as a challenge to his ego and resolved to make Sauron serve him, which backfired when Sauron charmed his way into Ar-Pharazon's council, persuading Ar-Pharazon to worship [[SatanicArchetype Morgoth]], instituting a ReligionOfEvil which practiced HumanSacrifice. Sauron eventually persuaded Ar-Pharazon to take Valinor, the land of the Gods, by force, and Ar-Pharazon's choice to lay claim to Valinor doomed Numenor when [[{{God}} Eru]] separated Valinor from the rest of the world and caused Numenor to be lost beneath the waves. While the rest of Numenor is mourned for its loss of a golden age, Ar-Pharazon is not, and he is condemned to linger in the world until the end of time.
** Saeros is a racist Elf in King Thingol's court who resented the presence of Turin as a ward of Thingol. One evening Saeros made insulting remarks about Turin's people, causing Turin to injure Saeros. The next morning, Saeros attempted to murder Turin over the last night's events, provoking Turin into stripping him and accidentally killing him by running him off a cliff. When Thingol heard of what Saeros had done, he pardoned Turin, while it was stated that Saeros would be held in Mandos, the land of the dead, for a long time due to his misdeeds.


* LandSeaAndSky: The fates of the Silmarils at the end of the First Age align with this theme; one is entombed in the depths of Arda, one falls to the bottom of the ocean, and one is aloft in the heavens on Eärendil's ship.

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* LandSeaAndSky: LandSeaSky: The fates of the Silmarils at the end of the First Age align with this theme; one is entombed in the depths of Arda, one falls to the bottom of the ocean, and one is aloft in the heavens on Eärendil's ship.

Added DiffLines:

* LandSeaAndSky: The fates of the Silmarils at the end of the First Age align with this theme; one is entombed in the depths of Arda, one falls to the bottom of the ocean, and one is aloft in the heavens on Eärendil's ship.


* OurElvesAreBetter: Debatable. ''TheSilmarillion'' shows Elves at their worst - there are only three cases of Elves having battles against each other in their entire history, and all of them happen in this 600-year time span - but even at their worst, they are still fighting ''against'' the BigBad, and spend 400 years keeping Beleriand (relatively) safe from the forces of evil. There is a grand total of ''one'' Elf, in their entire history, who willingly served an Evil power. The story of the Downfall of Númenor illustrates just how much worse Men can ben (basically: human sacrifices to the GodOfEvil in an attempt to invade and militarily conquer paradise).

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* OurElvesAreBetter: Debatable. ''TheSilmarillion'' ''The Silmarillion'' shows Elves at their worst - there are only three cases of Elves having battles against each other in their entire history, and all of them happen in this 600-year time span - but even at their worst, they are still fighting ''against'' the BigBad, and spend 400 years keeping Beleriand (relatively) safe from the forces of evil. There is a grand total of ''one'' Elf, in their entire history, who willingly served an Evil power. The Edain (Men) in ''The Silmarillion'' are often more admirable than the Elves. However, the story of the Downfall of Númenor illustrates just how much worse Men can ben be (basically: human sacrifices to the GodOfEvil in an attempt to invade and militarily conquer paradise).


* OurElvesAreBetter: Very much not, [[TheThemeParkVersion even if many people mistakenly think so]]. Yes, Elves are in many ways more powerful, "magical" and skilled than Men (they better be as they got long enough to practice), but they can be just as stupid, chauvinist, or violent as any Man, and can screw up monumentally. Possibly ''more'' than Men in fact, as their greater power lets them screw up more dramatically and cause more damage. Elves have more control over their bodies than Men, and thus are less inclined toward mundane sins like {{Lust}} and [[VillainousGlutton Gluttony]] and {{Sloth}}, but can fall to {{Wrath}} or {{Pride}} just as Men can. In other words, when an elf becomes evil it is not because he lacks willpower; it is because he actually ''intends'' to do so. Elves are more "in-tune" with the physical world than Mortal Men, since they are a permanent part of it. As such, they seem to feel things more intensely than Mortals, and as a consequence their errors in judgment can be far more damaging. Their peaks and valleys are more like mountains and canyons. An angry Elf is a PersonOfMassDestruction. A sad Elf can literally die of a broken heart.

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* OurElvesAreBetter: Very much not, [[TheThemeParkVersion even if many people mistakenly think so]]. Yes, Debatable. ''TheSilmarillion'' shows Elves at their worst - there are only three cases of Elves having battles against each other in their entire history, and all of them happen in this 600-year time span - but even at their worst, they are still fighting ''against'' the BigBad, and spend 400 years keeping Beleriand (relatively) safe from the forces of evil. There is a grand total of ''one'' Elf, in their entire history, who willingly served an Evil power. The story of the Downfall of Númenor illustrates just how much worse Men can ben (basically: human sacrifices to the GodOfEvil in an attempt to invade and militarily conquer paradise).
**Elves
are in many ways more powerful, "magical" and skilled than Men (they better be as they got long enough to practice), but they can be just as stupid, chauvinist, or violent as any Man, and can screw up monumentally. Possibly ''more'' than Men in fact, as their greater power lets them screw up more dramatically and cause more damage. Elves have more control over their bodies than Men, and thus are less inclined toward mundane sins like {{Lust}} and [[VillainousGlutton Gluttony]] and {{Sloth}}, but can fall to {{Wrath}} or {{Pride}} just as Men can. In other words, when an elf becomes evil it is not because he lacks willpower; it is because he actually ''intends'' to do so. Elves are more "in-tune" with the physical world than Mortal Men, since they are a permanent part of it. As such, they seem to feel things more intensely than Mortals, and as a consequence their errors in judgment can be far more damaging. Their peaks and valleys are more like mountains and canyons. An angry Elf is a PersonOfMassDestruction. A sad Elf can literally die of a broken heart.


* HeavenAndHell: Valinor is the beautiful Heaven of Arda. Morgoth's domain is the fiery Hell.

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* OurGodsAreDifferent:
** Eru Iluvatar is God in the Abrahamic sense; an all-powerful creator who exists outside of time and permeates everything. The Valar and Maiar should be thought of more like gods in the Classical sense, or, since they're subordinate to Eru, like angels. Tolkien might have been inspired by writers like Milton or Dante, who were very much Christian but still wanted to put pagan deities in their created worlds; there's a fair bit of justification for why the Valar don't violate the First Commandment by their very existence.
** As a side note, nobody in Arda seems to practice any form of organized worship of any of the above. The only exception we've seen is the fallen men of Numenor, and for them it's treated like a very bad thing and a sign that Sauron had corrupted them.

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