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** The chapter "Of Túrin Turambar" is further elaborated in the book ''Literature/TheChildrenOfHurin'' (named ''Narn i-Chîn Húrin'' in Sindarin, or Grey Elven). ''Beren and Lúthien'' was [[http://www.ew.com/article/2016/10/19/jrr-tolkien-beren-and-luthien-2017 also released in book form in 2017]].

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** The chapter "Of Túrin Turambar" is further elaborated in the book ''Literature/TheChildrenOfHurin'' (named ''Narn i-Chîn Húrin'' in Sindarin, or Grey Elven). ''Beren and Lúthien'' was [[http://www.ew.com/article/2016/10/19/jrr-tolkien-beren-and-luthien-2017 also released in book form in 2017]]. ''The Fall of Gondolin'' [[https://www.tolkiensociety.org/2018/08/the-fall-of-gondolin-published/ was published in 2018]].


* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: It isn't entirely clear what happens to Maglor, the only one of Feanor's sons to survive. He is kept by his oath and the judgement of the Valar from returning to Valinor.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: It isn't entirely clear what happens to Maglor, the only one of Feanor's sons to survive. He is kept by his oath and the judgement of the Valar from returning to Valinor. Needless to say, he is a ''very'' popular character in FanFiction, adventuring through the world history.


** The entirety of The War of Wrath is basically a decades last stand for Morgoth himself. An absolutely colossal force made up of just about every elf, human, dwarf and Maia available (and maybe even ''all of the Valar'') came to finally strike down Morgoth, but he put an equally horrifying fight but pulling every monster and trick he had in the book, even a dragon big enough to bloat out the sun. The War is stated to have been close during the last stages when Morgoth started using more and more terrifying monstrosities , but in the end it was his last ditch attempt to prevent his capture, which was unsuccessfu



** The entirety of The War of Wrath is basically a decades last stand for Morgoth himself. An absolutely colossal force made up of just about every elf, human, dwarf and Maia available (and maybe even ''all of the Valar'') came to finally strike down Morgoth, but he put an equally horrifying fight but pulling every monster and trick he had in the book, even a dragon big enough to bloat out the sun. The War is stated to have been close during the last stages when Morgoth started using more and more terrifying monstrosities , but in the end it was his last ditch attempt to prevent his capture, which was unsuccessful

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** The entirety of The War of Wrath is basically a decades last stand for Morgoth himself. An absolutely colossal force made up of just about every elf, human, dwarf and Maia available (and maybe even ''all of the Valar'') came to finally strike down Morgoth, but he put an equally horrifying fight but pulling every monster and trick he had in the book, even a dragon big enough to bloat out the sun. The War is stated to have been close during the last stages when Morgoth started using more and more terrifying monstrosities , but in the end it was his last ditch attempt to prevent his capture, which was unsuccessfull

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** The entirety of The War of Wrath is basically a decades last stand for Morgoth himself. An absolutely colossal force made up of just about every elf, human, dwarf and Maia available (and maybe even ''all of the Valar'') came to finally strike down Morgoth, but he put an equally horrifying fight but pulling every monster and trick he had in the book, even a dragon big enough to bloat out the sun. The War is stated to have been close during the last stages when Morgoth started using more and more terrifying monstrosities , but in the end it was his last ditch attempt to prevent his capture, which was unsuccessful

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* BloodKnight: Fëanor and his seven sons.

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* ProgressiveInstrumentation: A rare literary example, the Song of Iluvatar is described as this. Each of the Valar adds their voice to the rest, one by one, and Iluvatar adapts the song to fit each new voice, including Melkor when he attempts to turn it into a dirge...

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* WickedStepmother: Inverted with Indis and Fëanor. After death of his first wife Miriel, Finwë marries Indis. Indis attempts to be as good stepmother to Miriel's son Fëanor as she can, but Fëanor cannot accept her, and he hates the sons or Indis, Fingolfin and Finarfin.


* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: As a whole it really is depending on whichever story you read.

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* %%* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: As a whole it really is depending on whichever story you read.read. %% Zero Context


One of [[WordOfGod Tolkien's letters]] stated that it was impossible for the Valar to make any Man truly immortal. If one ever entered the Undying Lands, they would ''exist'' and seemingly not age long past when they should have died, but their life would gradually become unbearable, since it would just be [[AgeWithoutYouth their natural lifespan spread out continuously]] (similar to what happened to Gollum and Bilbo with the One Ring). Also, it is said in the book that death is Eru's gift to mortals and the Valar don't have the right or ability to take it from them -- only Eru can, and Tuor was likely the only such exception. Before the fall of Númenor, Men ''were'' immortal in the sense that they could ''choose'' when to die. Since Númenor though, Eru was forced to change the gift to introduce lifespans, as Men, thanks to the corrupting influence of Sauron, started to view it as a curse.

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One of [[WordOfGod Tolkien's letters]] stated that it was impossible for the Valar to make any Man truly immortal. If one ever entered the Undying Lands, they would ''exist'' and seemingly not age long past when they should have died, but their life would gradually become unbearable, since it would just be [[AgeWithoutYouth their natural lifespan spread out continuously]] (similar to what happened to Gollum and Bilbo with the One Ring). Also, it is said in the book that death is Eru's gift to mortals and the Valar don't have the right or ability to take it from them -- only Eru can, and Tuor was likely the only such exception. Before the fall of Númenor, Men ''were'' immortal in the sense that they could ''choose'' when to die. Since Númenor though, Eru was forced to change the gift to introduce lifespans, as Men, thanks to the corrupting influence of Sauron, started to view it as a curse.


** The War of the Last Alliance, where Sauron's outnumbered and outgunned force whips the hell out of the West for a very long time, and nearly wins until Isildur chops off Sauron's Ring.


** Sauron. The only heroes to ever fight him man-to-man and succeed were Huan, a Valarian hound, and Isildur, son of Elendil. Plenty of others ''tried'' to fight him, sure, but they're not listed as successful here, are they?

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** Sauron. The only heroes hero to ever fight him man-to-man and succeed were was Huan, a Valarian hound, hound. Elendil, the King of Gondor and Isildur, son Arnor, and Gil-Galad, High King of Elendil. Plenty of others ''tried'' the Noldor, managed to fight him, sure, but they're kill him in combat as well, however they did not listed as successful here, are they?survive the battle either.

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* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: As a whole it really is depending on whichever story you read.

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* BeingEvilSucks: By the end of the First Age, the surviving sons of Feanor have realized that their oath has brought nothing but pain and suffering to the world. They still feel compelled to try stealing the Silmarils, and they're completely miserable about it.


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* MeaninglessVillainVictory: In the end, [[spoiler:Maedhros and Maglor]] are finally able to succeed at [[spoiler:getting the Silmarils]]. The only problem is that [[spoiler:they've done so many terrible things along the way that the Silmarils burn them at the touch]], which leads to [[spoiler:Maedhros throwing one Silmaril, and himself, into a volcano and Maglor to throw the other Silmaril into the ocean.]]


* OurVampiresAreDifferent: They appear to be not undead, but rather a specific class of Maia, or perhaps mutated animals. Only one is named, Thuringwethil, Sauron's messenger, and only it's mentioned that she can take the form of a bat.

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* OurVampiresAreDifferent: They appear to be not undead, but rather a specific class of Maia, or perhaps mutated animals. Only one is named, Thuringwethil, Sauron's messenger, and only it's only mentioned that she can take the form of a bat.

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** Subverted by Maglor, while an elf and thus immortal, who is forbidden ever return to Elvenhome. Which means ''he is still here amongst us''.

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