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* BerserkButton: In the film adaptation, a drug-crazed Holmes angrily calls Watson an idiot, but Watson isn't fazed. Then Holmes calls him an "insufferable cripple", and Watson decks him with one punch.
** Later, in a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming, a weakened and contrite Holmes humbly apologizes for his outburst. Watson, deeply moved, denies that the incident ever occurred.

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* BerserkButton: In the film adaptation, a drug-crazed Holmes angrily calls Watson an idiot, but Watson isn't fazed. Then Holmes calls him an "insufferable cripple", and Watson decks him with one punch.
**
punch. Later, in a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming, a weakened and contrite Holmes humbly apologizes for his outburst. Watson, deeply moved, denies that the incident ever occurred.

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* HistoricalCharactersFictionalRelative: In the film adaptation, Sigmund Freud is given a son. He had one daughther in real life, who was included in the book, but she threatened to sue if her image was used in the film (she had no power over uses of her ''father's'' image, however).

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* ADeadlyAffair: A case in Vienna is about this trope. Holmes is brought to Austria to meet [[YoungFutureFamousPeople budding psychologist]] Sigmund Freud, in an effort to treat Holmes for a cocaine addiction. There, Freud discovers that Holmes's mother was caught with a lover by his father, who murdered the pair for their infidelity. It was young Holmes's mathematics tutor, Professor Moriarty that delivered the horrible news to him. Thus, concludes Freud, Holmes developed his dogged justice-must-prevail ethic, and his vilifying Moriarty is a Shoot the Messenger coping mechanism.

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[[quoteright:220:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/seven_percent_solution_first_edition_us.jpg]]


The 1976 film version, with a screenplay by Meyer, was produced and directed by Herbert Ross, and featured Alan Arkin (as Freud), Creator/VanessaRedgrave (as Lola Devereaux), Creator/RobertDuvall (as Watson), Nicol Williamson (as Holmes) and Creator/LaurenceOlivier (as Moriarty). It also featured Charles Gray as Mycroft, who would later reprise the role in the [[Series/SherlockHolmes Granada series]] with Creator/JeremyBrett.

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The 1976 film version, with a screenplay by Meyer, was produced and directed by Herbert Ross, and featured Alan Arkin (as Freud), Creator/VanessaRedgrave (as Lola Devereaux), Creator/RobertDuvall (as Watson), Nicol Williamson (as Holmes) and Creator/LaurenceOlivier (as Moriarty). It also featured Charles Gray Creator/CharlesGray as Mycroft, who would later reprise the role in the [[Series/SherlockHolmes Granada series]] with Creator/JeremyBrett.


The 1976 film version, with a screenplay by Meyer, was produced and directed by Herbert Ross, and featured Alan Arkin (as Freud), Creator/VanessaRedgrave (as Lola Devereaux), Creator/RobertDuvall (as Watson), Nicol Williamson (as Holmes) and Creator/LaurenceOlivier (as Moriarty).

to:

The 1976 film version, with a screenplay by Meyer, was produced and directed by Herbert Ross, and featured Alan Arkin (as Freud), Creator/VanessaRedgrave (as Lola Devereaux), Creator/RobertDuvall (as Watson), Nicol Williamson (as Holmes) and Creator/LaurenceOlivier (as Moriarty).
Moriarty). It also featured Charles Gray as Mycroft, who would later reprise the role in the [[Series/SherlockHolmes Granada series]] with Creator/JeremyBrett.


* AdaptationalVillainy: Moriarty is on the receiving end of this. [[spoiler: In the book, Moriarty is merely the person who informs Sherlock of his mother's affair and death at her husband's hands. In the film, Moriarty actually is Mrs. Holmes' lover, and Sherlock sees him flee the scene after Squire Holmes shoots his wife dead, right in front of Moriarty and Sherlock.]]

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* AdaptationalVillainy: Moriarty is on the receiving end of this. [[spoiler: In [[spoiler:In the book, Moriarty is merely the person who informs Sherlock of his mother's affair and death at her husband's hands. In the film, Moriarty actually is Mrs. Holmes' lover, and Sherlock sees him flee the scene after Squire Holmes shoots his wife dead, right in front of Moriarty and Sherlock.]]



* PluckyGirl: Fraulein Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds with the shards, and sliding down a metal pipe, and she faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.

to:

* PluckyGirl: Fraulein Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds with the shards, and sliding down a metal pipe, and she faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl withdrawal again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.


* BerserkButton: In the film adaptation, a drug-crazed Holmes angrily calls Watson an idiot, but Watson isn't phased. Then Holmes calls him an "insufferable cripple", and Watson decks him with one punch.

to:

* BerserkButton: In the film adaptation, a drug-crazed Holmes angrily calls Watson an idiot, but Watson isn't phased.fazed. Then Holmes calls him an "insufferable cripple", and Watson decks him with one punch.

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalVillainy: Moriarty is on the receiving end of this. [[spoiler: In the book, Moriarty is merely the person who informs Sherlock of his mother's affair and death at her husband's hands. In the film, Moriarty actually is Mrs. Holmes' lover, and Sherlock sees him flee the scene after Squire Holmes shoots his wife dead, right in front of Moriarty and Sherlock.]]

Added DiffLines:

* BerserkButton: In the film adaptation, a drug-crazed Holmes angrily calls Watson an idiot, but Watson isn't phased. Then Holmes calls him an "insufferable cripple", and Watson decks him with one punch.
** Later, in a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming, a weakened and contrite Holmes humbly apologizes for his outburst. Watson, deeply moved, denies that the incident ever occurred.


Added DiffLines:

* HandicappedBadass: Watson is this, particularly in the film adaptation. While Freud attempts to revive Holmes from a hypnotic trance, Watson, in spite of his limp, leads a group of wild horses away from them. Later, during the train chase, he climbs along the engine to go to Holmes' aid.


* OnlyTheKnowledgableMayPass: At the start of the movie, [[MushroomSamba a manic, paranoid Holmes]] only lets Watson into his apartment after the good doctor correctly identifies where Sherlock keeps his tobacco.[[note]][[MythologyGag In the toe of a Persian slipper, of course]][[/note]]

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* OnlyTheKnowledgableMayPass: At the start of the movie, [[MushroomSamba a manic, paranoid Holmes]] only lets Watson into his apartment after the good doctor correctly identifies where Sherlock keeps his tobacco.[[note]][[MythologyGag In the toe of a Persian slipper, of course]][[/note]]course.]][[/note]]


* FoodSlap: When [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic Baron von Leinsdorf]] insults Dr. Freud [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain for his Jewish ancestry]] and then-radical psychological theories in a sports club locker room, Watson throws a glass of water in his face and prepares to fist-fight him and his whole gang of cronies. Freud takes responsibility for his companion's actions, and the doctor and the Baron end up facing each other in a vigorous game of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_tennis real tennis]].

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* FoodSlap: When [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic [[UsefulNotes/TheSoundOfMartialMusic Baron von Leinsdorf]] insults Dr. Freud [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain for his Jewish ancestry]] and then-radical psychological theories in a sports club locker room, Watson throws a glass of water in his face and prepares to fist-fight him and his whole gang of cronies. Freud takes responsibility for his companion's actions, and the doctor and the Baron end up facing each other in a vigorous game of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_tennis real tennis]].


* PluckyGirl: Lola Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds with the shards, and sliding down a metal pipe, and she faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.

to:

* PluckyGirl: Lola Fraulein Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds with the shards, and sliding down a metal pipe, and she faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.


* PluckyGirl: Lola Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds, and sliding down a metal pipe, and faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.

to:

* PluckyGirl: Lola Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds, bonds with the shards, and sliding down a metal pipe, and she faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.

Added DiffLines:

* PluckyGirl: Lola Deveraux; After being forcibly re-addicted to cocaine, she escapes by breaking a glass window, cutting her bonds, and sliding down a metal pipe, and faces the prospect of having to go through withdrawl again with a sad sigh. When Baron von Leinsdorf later "convinces" her to leave the asylum, she leaves a trail of flowers for Holmes and company to follow.

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