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* EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses: Inverted, often it's the protagonists' statuses as princesses (or other royalty) that makes their lives difficult.


* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: Borderline case in the book about Ka'iulani. After the coup d'etat that removes the Hawaiian royal family from power, Ka'iulani complains that the new President of Hawaii is not elected by the people. This completely ignores the fact that none of the previous rulers were elected by the people, and she didn't care too much. Granted, [[GreyAndGrayMorality the Americans were no saints,]] to say the least, but the book seems to imply that autocratic rule is okay when the protagonists do it. Two of the three previous ruler were elected by the people. When the previous ruler died without naming a heir, the next ruler had to be elected among suitable royals. Lunalilo, the future king, insisted.

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* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: Borderline case in the book about Ka'iulani. After the coup d'etat that removes the Hawaiian royal family from power, Ka'iulani complains that the new President of Hawaii is not elected by the people. This completely ignores the fact that none of the previous rulers were elected by the people, and she didn't care too much. Granted, [[GreyAndGrayMorality the Americans were no saints,]] to say the least, but the book seems to imply that autocratic rule is okay when the protagonists do it. it.
**
Two of the three previous ruler were rulers ''were'' elected by the people. people (well, some of them, anyway). When the previous ruler died without naming a an heir, the next ruler had to be elected among suitable royals. Lunalilo, the future king, insisted.

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* OneSteveLimit: Massively averted in ''Mary: Queen Without A Country'', where the eponymous character's entourage consists of four girls also named Mary. The protagonist refers to them almost exclusively by full names to prevent confusion.

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* DatedHistory: Sondok is how her name is spelled under an old Romanization system, these days it would be spelled Seondeok.


** The other books play this trope straight. Granted, its pkausible that some of them haven't started having them yet, but it's weird in a couple cases when you consider Anacaona [[spoiler: gets pregnant]] in her book, and in real life the Generale Krottendorf (as it was so [[UnusualEuphemism euphemistically]] referred as) was a regular topic of conversation between Marie Antoinette and her mother Maria Theresa, and Antoinette moved to France pretty much as soon as she achieved menarche.

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** The other books play this trope straight. Granted, its pkausible plausible that some of them haven't started having them yet, but it's weird in a couple cases when you consider Anacaona [[spoiler: gets pregnant]] in her book, and in real life the Generale Krottendorf (as it was so [[UnusualEuphemism euphemistically]] referred as) was a regular topic of conversation between Marie Antoinette and her mother Maria Theresa, and Antoinette moved to France pretty much as soon as she achieved menarche.


** In ''Cleopatra VII: Daughter of the Nile'' the pharaoh says that only the noble class should study philosophy and astronomy. The princess doesn't like like it but agrees.

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** In ''Cleopatra VII: Daughter of the Nile'' the pharaoh says that only the noble class should study philosophy and astronomy. The princess doesn't like like it but agrees.


** Princess Cleopatra would wander the harbor with her favorite maid dressed as common Creek girls so they could passed unnoticed.

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** Princess Cleopatra would wander the harbor with her favorite maid dressed as common Creek Greek girls so they could passed unnoticed.


* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Can be invoked, if not in the books themselves, then by the reader. Isabel and Fernando are better known as Ferdinand and Isabella to, at least, American audiences, and Sondok is probably best known as Seondeok, thanks in part to the Korean drama of the same name. Justified cause of language differences and interpretations.

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* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Can be invoked, if not in the books themselves, then by the reader. Isabel and Fernando are better known as Ferdinand and Isabella to, at least, American audiences, and Sondok is probably best known as Seondeok, thanks in part to the Korean drama of the same name. Justified cause of by language differences and interpretations.interpretations.
** For the first half of ''Marie Antoinette: Princess of Versailles'', the princess is referred to as Antonia. (Her given name was, in fact, Maria Antonia; at the time, it wasn't uncommon for royal girls who married into a different country's nobility to have their names changed to a variation native to their new country.)


** The other books play this trope straight. Granted, its pkausible that some of them haven't started having them yet, but it's weird in a couple cases when you consider Anacaona [[spoiler: gets pregnant]] in her book, and in real life the Generale Krottendorf (as it was so [[UnusualEuphemism euphemistically]] referred as) was a regular topic of conversation between Marie Antoinette and her mother Maria Theresa.

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** The other books play this trope straight. Granted, its pkausible that some of them haven't started having them yet, but it's weird in a couple cases when you consider Anacaona [[spoiler: gets pregnant]] in her book, and in real life the Generale Krottendorf (as it was so [[UnusualEuphemism euphemistically]] referred as) was a regular topic of conversation between Marie Antoinette and her mother Maria Theresa.Theresa, and Antoinette moved to France pretty much as soon as she achieved menarche.


** Princess Elizabeth suffers from this trope, though she puts more emphasis on her father saying she and Mary are "illegitimate" than their genders. [[note]]Not that the two were entirely disconnected; Henry specifically called them illegitimate (and divorced Mary's mother, even though he had to create a new national religion to do it) in order to position Edward, his only son, as the obvious heir.[[/note]]
** Anastasia tells the story of her birth: everyone was disappointed upon the birth of each of her sisters, since a girl could not be tsar. When she, the fourth child, was born, everyone was praying for a boy, and were especially disappointed to find she was another girl. A servant claims that her father was so upset, he cried.

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** Princess Elizabeth suffers from this trope, though she puts more emphasis on her father saying she and Mary are "illegitimate" than their genders. [[note]]Not that the two were entirely disconnected; Henry specifically called them illegitimate (and divorced Mary's mother, even though he had to create a new national religion to do it) in order to get a son, and then, once he had one, to position Edward, his only son, Edward as the obvious primary heir.[[/note]]
** Anastasia tells the story of her birth: everyone was disappointed upon the birth of each of her sisters, since a girl could not be tsar. When she, the fourth child, was born, everyone was praying for a boy, and were especially disappointed to find she was another girl. A servant claims that her father was so upset, he cried. (The worst part is, given their ultimate fates, it turned out not to even matter.)


** Elizabeth I's father is alternately doting and disdainful towards her, occasionally sentencing her to a kind of soft exile when she makes him particularly mad. [[note]]It's not mentioned in the story, but history suggests his behavior towards his other daughter, Mary, was much the same.[[/note]]

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** Elizabeth I's father is alternately doting and disdainful contemptuous towards her, occasionally sentencing her to a kind of soft exile when she makes him particularly mad. [[note]]It's not mentioned in the story, but history suggests his behavior towards his other daughter, Mary, was much the same.[[/note]]


** Princess Elizabeth suffers from this trope, though she puts more emphasis on her father saying she and Mary are "illegitimate" than their genders.

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** Princess Elizabeth suffers from this trope, though she puts more emphasis on her father saying she and Mary are "illegitimate" than their genders. [[note]]Not that the two were entirely disconnected; Henry specifically called them illegitimate (and divorced Mary's mother, even though he had to create a new national religion to do it) in order to position Edward, his only son, as the obvious heir.[[/note]]


** There is an implied inversion with all the [[WisePrince wise princesses]] especially with ''Sondok: Princess of The Moon And Stars'' where she is proud of how forward her kingdom is which requires an unanimous aristocratic vote before they can enact any important law.

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** There is an implied inversion with all the [[WisePrince wise princesses]] princesses]], especially with in ''Sondok: Princess of The Moon And Stars'' Stars'', where she is proud of how forward her kingdom is which requires for requiring an unanimous aristocratic vote before they can enact any important law.


** Inverted in ''Elisabeth: The Princess Bride'' who, as it was stated in the end, preferred a democracy. There is an implied inversion with all the [[WisePrince wise princesses]] especially with ''Sondok: Princess of The Moon And Stars'' where she is proud of how forward her kingdom is which requires an unanimous aristocratic vote before they can enact any important law.

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** Inverted in ''Elisabeth: The Princess Bride'' who, as it was stated in the end, preferred a democracy. democracy.
**
There is an implied inversion with all the [[WisePrince wise princesses]] especially with ''Sondok: Princess of The Moon And Stars'' where she is proud of how forward her kingdom is which requires an unanimous aristocratic vote before they can enact any important law.


** Elizabeth I's father is alternately doting and disdainful towards her, occasionally sentencing her to a kind of soft exile when she makes him particularly mad. [[note]]It's not mentioned in the story, but history suggests he behaved similarly towards his other daughter, Mary.[[/note]]

to:

** Elizabeth I's father is alternately doting and disdainful towards her, occasionally sentencing her to a kind of soft exile when she makes him particularly mad. [[note]]It's not mentioned in the story, but history suggests he behaved similarly his behavior towards his other daughter, Mary.Mary, was much the same.[[/note]]

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