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** In an example of RealityEnsues, Drummond himself is unavailable for part of the fast tracking process, so the judge schedules it anyway ''because'' the defense has an army and thus won't be inconvenienced by this, a real life downside of using an ArmyOfLawyers.

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** In an example of RealityEnsues, Drummond himself is unavailable for part of the a deposition for fast tracking process, the case, so the judge schedules it anyway ''because'' the defense has an army and thus won't be inconvenienced by this, a real life downside of using an ArmyOfLawyers.


-->'''Rudy''': ''I do believe that '''centuries''' of cumulative legal experience are seated at this table, all in opposition to me.''

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-->'''Rudy''': ''I I do believe that '''centuries''' of cumulative legal experience are seated at this table, all in opposition to me.''



** In an example of RealityEnsues, Drummond himself is unavailable for part of the fast tracking process, so the judge schedules it anyway ''because'' the defense has an army and thus won't be inconvenienced by this, a real life downside of using an ArmyOfLawyers.
--->I'm sorry if it inconveniences the defense, but God knows...there's enough of you guys to handle it.



** ''Technically speaking'', Rudy ''pretending'' to call a juror is not illegal. It ''is'', however, ''ethically'' wrong: the more ethical move would've been to take this information to the judge and the Bar Association. [[spoiler:This is part of why Rudy quits the profession at the end of the book.]]

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** ''Technically speaking'', Rudy ''pretending'' to call a juror is not illegal. It ''is'', however, ''ethically'' wrong: the more ethical move would've been to take this information to the judge and the Bar Association.Association and potentially have Drummond disbarred. [[spoiler:This is part of why Rudy quits the profession at the end of the book.]]


Added DiffLines:

* LoopholeAbuse: After Rudy is able to have damning evidence entered, he "accidentally" moves the microphone away from the witness before he reads it, then asks the witness to repeat it louder because the microphone was too far away, so he can have the witness repeat a damning testimony and have a legitimate counter to Drummond's objection to the repetition.


* AmoralAttorney: On both sides. Rudy discovers [[spoiler:that Tinley Britt (the opposing law firm) has tapped his phones]]. He realizes that he'll never prove it was them, so he takes a different strategy. [[spoiler:He leaves the taps in place, and feeds them false information, making them look like fools in the courtroom]]. Rudy, however, never actually breaks any part of the code of ethics. He does, however, come ''very close'', [[spoiler: which contributes to him giving up his license at the end.]] [[spoiler: Not only do the opposing counsel look like fools in the eyes of the jury, but the key point was that Rudy got Drummond to fight with a potential juror he thought would be sympathetic to the defense, and get him thrown out, thus rigging the jury in Rudy's favor.]

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* AmoralAttorney: On both sides. Rudy discovers [[spoiler:that Tinley Britt (the opposing law firm) has tapped his phones]]. He realizes that he'll never prove it was them, so he takes a different strategy. [[spoiler:He leaves the taps in place, and feeds them false information, making them look like fools in the courtroom]]. Rudy, however, never actually breaks any part of the code of ethics. He does, however, come ''very close'', [[spoiler: which contributes to him giving up his license at the end.]] [[spoiler: Not only do the opposing counsel look like fools in the eyes of the jury, but the key point was that Rudy got Drummond to fight with a potential juror he thought would be sympathetic to the defense, and get him thrown out, thus rigging the jury in Rudy's favor.]]]


* BluffTheEavesdropper: Rudy's plan in the AmoralAttorney entry, in which [[spoiler:Tinley Britt taps Rudy's phones, so Rudy and Deck have someone impersonate a potential juror, making the opposing counsel look like fools when they try to confront the real juror.]] Of course, they could have taken this information to the judge and had them disbarred instead.

to:

* BluffTheEavesdropper: Rudy's plan in the AmoralAttorney entry, in which [[spoiler:Tinley Britt taps Rudy's phones, so Rudy and Deck have someone impersonate a potential juror, making the opposing counsel look like fools when they try to confront the real juror.]] Of course, they could have taken this information to the judge and had them disbarred instead.]]


* AmoralAttorney: On both sides. Rudy discovers [[spoiler:that Tinley Britt (the opposing law firm) has tapped his phones]]. He realizes that he'll never prove it was them, so he takes a different strategy. [[spoiler:He leaves the taps in place, and feeds them false information, making them look like fools in the courtroom]]. Rudy, however, never actually breaks any part of the code of ethics. He does, however, come ''very close'', [[spoiler: which contributes to him giving up his license at the end.]] [[spoiler: Not only do the opposing counsel look like fools in the eyes of the jury, but the key point was that Rudy got Drummond to fight with a potential juror he thought would be sympathetic to the defense, and get him thrown out, thus rigging the jury in Rudy's favor.]][[note]]Of course, the cleaner method Rudy could've done would be to just take this information to the judge, and gotten the entirety of the opposing counsel disbarred[[/note]]

to:

* AmoralAttorney: On both sides. Rudy discovers [[spoiler:that Tinley Britt (the opposing law firm) has tapped his phones]]. He realizes that he'll never prove it was them, so he takes a different strategy. [[spoiler:He leaves the taps in place, and feeds them false information, making them look like fools in the courtroom]]. Rudy, however, never actually breaks any part of the code of ethics. He does, however, come ''very close'', [[spoiler: which contributes to him giving up his license at the end.]] [[spoiler: Not only do the opposing counsel look like fools in the eyes of the jury, but the key point was that Rudy got Drummond to fight with a potential juror he thought would be sympathetic to the defense, and get him thrown out, thus rigging the jury in Rudy's favor.]][[note]]Of course, the cleaner method Rudy could've done would be to just take this information to the judge, and gotten the entirety of the opposing counsel disbarred[[/note]]]


* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: Played with: [[spoiler:at the end of the story, Rudy has won a miracle verdict against the insurance company, though because they declared bankruptcy, he'll never see a dime in fees. Rather than riding his reputation to a successful legal career, he decides he has no interest in practicing the law after seeing the blatant disregard for ethics, along with recognizing that any future client he has will expect the same magic and he'll never be able to deliver without resorting to increasingly underhanded tactics. Instead, he leaves town, heading for the West Coast where he's less likely to be recognized, maybe to teach the law.]] We also can't forget Keeley either, attempting to leave the country after his testimony goes bad, apparently having looted his own company.

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* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: ScrewThisImOuttaHere:
** When Deck realizes that Bruiser won't be able to keep the authorities at bay for much longer, he convinces Rudy to leave with him to start up their own operation.
**
Played with: [[spoiler:at the end of the story, Rudy has won a miracle verdict against the insurance company, though because they declared bankruptcy, he'll never see a dime in fees. Rather than riding his reputation to a successful legal career, he decides he has no interest in practicing the law after seeing the blatant disregard for ethics, along with recognizing that any future client he has will expect the same magic and he'll never be able to deliver without resorting to increasingly underhanded tactics. Instead, he leaves town, heading for the West Coast where he's less likely to be recognized, maybe to teach the law.]] We also can't forget Keeley either, attempting to leave the country after his testimony goes bad, apparently having looted his own company.


* AmbulanceChaser: Rudy's partner Deck Shifflet qualifies except for one thing: he hasn't managed to pass the bar exam. Rudy dislikes the practice, but is forced to do it just to make ends meet when he hits rock bottom. [[spoiler: Rudy never actually signs up a single case.]]

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* AmbulanceChaser: AmbulanceChaser:
** Bruiser Stone built his practice on chasing ambulances and filing suits for injured parties.
**
Rudy's partner Deck Shifflet qualifies except for one thing: he hasn't managed to pass the bar exam. Rudy dislikes the practice, but is forced to do it just to make ends meet when he hits rock bottom. [[spoiler: Rudy never actually signs up a single case.]]


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* OOCIsSeriousBusiness: Bruiser giving Rudy and Deck generous bonuses raises alarm bells in Deck and serves as a catalyst to his suggesting that he and Rudy strike out on their own.


Added DiffLines:

* PyrrhicVictory: Rudy wins his case but he's so worn down and hardened by the experience that he decides to give up on his dream of a legal career and move to a new town.


* DomesticAbuser: Kelly's husband.

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* DomesticAbuser: DomesticAbuse: Kelly's husband.


* JuryAndWitnessTampering: Rudy's BluffTheEavesdropper gambit, which is even referred to by Deck when Rudy comes up with it. It also serves as a unique way to ''voir dire'' the jury. Rudy and Deck figure out from investigating that one Billy Porter is the one juror least likely to be in favor of the plaintiffs. So, Deck has a stooge call Rudy's office from a payphone pretending to be Billy Porter, reading off a script with instructions on what tone of voice to use in each line. The conversation is recorded by the opposing counsel. Drummond ''voir dires'' the jury and asks Porter if he has engaged in communications with Rudy. Which the real Porter fervently denies because it wasn't him. He gets worked up by the oblivious Drummond until he snaps, leaps over the ledge separating the jury box from the well, and attacks Drummond, forcing the bailiff to tackle him. Once order is restored, Judge Kipler has Porter dismissed from the jury and replaced with an alternate. By falling for Rudy's false information hook, line, and sinker, the defense counsel both have made a fool of themselves but also made it so the jury would be biased against them.

to:

* JuryAndWitnessTampering: Rudy's BluffTheEavesdropper gambit, which is even referred to by Deck when Rudy comes up with it. It also serves as a unique way to ''voir dire'' the jury. [[note]]The process by which prospective jurors are screened about their backgrounds and potential biases before being chosen to sit on a jury[[/note]] Rudy and Deck figure out from investigating that one Billy Porter is the one juror least likely to be in favor of the plaintiffs. So, Deck has a stooge call Rudy's office from a payphone pretending to be Billy Porter, reading off a script with instructions on what tone of voice to use in each line. The conversation is recorded by the opposing counsel. Drummond ''voir dires'' approaches the jury and asks Porter if he has engaged in communications with Rudy. Which the real Porter fervently denies because it wasn't him. He Porter gets worked up by the oblivious Drummond until he snaps, leaps over the ledge separating the jury box from the well, and attacks Drummond, forcing the bailiff to tackle him. Once order is restored, Judge Kipler has Porter dismissed from the jury and replaced with an alternate. By falling for Rudy's false information hook, line, and sinker, the defense counsel both have made a fool of themselves but also made it so the jury would be biased against them.


* LastDitchMove: In the novel. During his summation, Drummond admits that Great Benefit should have paid for the transplant and merely asks the jury not to destroy a company for the actions of a few bad apples who have been fired. It's an incredibly stupid thing for a lawyer to do (admit fault), especially when he knows there will be many more lawsuits in the near future, but it's all he can do to attempt to control the damage because he already knows that they lost the case.

to:

* LastDitchMove: In the novel. During his summation, Drummond admits that Great Benefit should have paid for the transplant and merely asks the jury not to destroy a company for the actions of a few bad apples who have been fired. It's an incredibly stupid thing for a lawyer to do (admit fault), especially when he knows there this will be open the floodgates to many more lawsuits in the near future, but it's all he can do to attempt to control the damage because he already knows that they lost the case.


* AmoralAttorney: On both sides. Rudy discovers [[spoiler:that Tinley Britt (the opposing law firm) has tapped his phones]]. He realizes that he'll never prove it was them, so he takes a different strategy. [[spoiler:He leaves the taps in place, and feeds them false information, making them look like fools in the courtroom]]. Rudy, however, never actually breaks any part of the code of ethics. He does, however, come ''very close'', [[spoiler: which contributes to him giving up his license at the end.]] [[spoiler: Not only do the opposing counsel look like fools, but the key point was that Rudy got Drummond to fight with a potential juror he thought would be sympathetic to the defense, and get him thrown out, thus rigging the jury in Rudy's favor.]][[note]]Of course, the cleaner method Rudy could've done would be to just take this information to the judge, and gotten the entirety of the opposing counsel disbarred[[/note]]

to:

* AmoralAttorney: On both sides. Rudy discovers [[spoiler:that Tinley Britt (the opposing law firm) has tapped his phones]]. He realizes that he'll never prove it was them, so he takes a different strategy. [[spoiler:He leaves the taps in place, and feeds them false information, making them look like fools in the courtroom]]. Rudy, however, never actually breaks any part of the code of ethics. He does, however, come ''very close'', [[spoiler: which contributes to him giving up his license at the end.]] [[spoiler: Not only do the opposing counsel look like fools, fools in the eyes of the jury, but the key point was that Rudy got Drummond to fight with a potential juror he thought would be sympathetic to the defense, and get him thrown out, thus rigging the jury in Rudy's favor.]][[note]]Of course, the cleaner method Rudy could've done would be to just take this information to the judge, and gotten the entirety of the opposing counsel disbarred[[/note]]



* HesitationEqualsDishonesty: When asked by Judge Kipler if he's ever handled a case that was fast-tracked, Drummond says he has. But then Kipler asks him for the specific case, and Drummond hesitates that he'll have to get back to him on that.



** In the FilmOfTheBook, Drummond standing up for Rudy so that he'll be the lawyer for the case, believing they can use his own inexperience against him. That really comes back to bite them in the ass later.

to:

** In the FilmOfTheBook, Drummond standing up for Rudy at Rudy's swearing-in, so that he'll be the lawyer for the case, believing they can use his own inexperience against him. That really comes back to bite them in the ass later.



* JuryAndWitnessTampering: Rudy's BluffTheEavesdropper gambit, which is even referred to by Deck when Rudy comes up with it. An exploited trope in that ''technically speaking'' Rudy ''pretending'' to call a juror is not illegal. It ''is'', however, ''ethically'' wrong: the more ethical move would've been to take this information to the judge and get Drummond's firm disbarred. [[spoiler:This is part of why Rudy quits the profession at the end of the book.]]
* KickTheSonOfABitch: Drummond is smug and unethical, and he represents a very shady company, but Judge Kipler can be downright ''mean'' to him.

to:

* JuryAndWitnessTampering: Rudy's BluffTheEavesdropper gambit, which is even referred to by Deck when Rudy comes up with it. An exploited trope in It also serves as a unique way to ''voir dire'' the jury. Rudy and Deck figure out from investigating that ''technically speaking'' one Billy Porter is the one juror least likely to be in favor of the plaintiffs. So, Deck has a stooge call Rudy's office from a payphone pretending to be Billy Porter, reading off a script with instructions on what tone of voice to use in each line. The conversation is recorded by the opposing counsel. Drummond ''voir dires'' the jury and asks Porter if he has engaged in communications with Rudy. Which the real Porter fervently denies because it wasn't him. He gets worked up by the oblivious Drummond until he snaps, leaps over the ledge separating the jury box from the well, and attacks Drummond, forcing the bailiff to tackle him. Once order is restored, Judge Kipler has Porter dismissed from the jury and replaced with an alternate. By falling for Rudy's false information hook, line, and sinker, the defense counsel both have made a fool of themselves but also made it so the jury would be biased against them.
**''Technically speaking'',
Rudy ''pretending'' to call a juror is not illegal. It ''is'', however, ''ethically'' wrong: the more ethical move would've been to take this information to the judge and get Drummond's firm disbarred.the Bar Association. [[spoiler:This is part of why Rudy quits the profession at the end of the book.]]
* KickTheSonOfABitch: Drummond is smug and unethical, and he represents a very shady company, but Judge Kipler can be downright ''mean'' ''cruel'' to him.him, and certainly not without justification.


Added DiffLines:

** During the hearing where the lawyers are meeting with Judge Kipler to schedule a deposition for Donnie Ray's testimony as part of a motion to fast-track the discovery process. Drummond tries to ask for a later deposition date than the one Judge Kipler sets, on the excuse that he'll be out of town. Problem is, Drummond's shown up with a whole {{army of lawyers}}. Since Drummond has multiple co-counsel with him at counsel table who can adequately handle things on their own, Kipler obviously doesn't buy Drummond's excuse that his schedule doesn't allow him to participate in certain things, and keeps the deposition at the originally planned date, adding, "I'm sorry if it inconveniences the defense, but God knows...there's enough of you guys to handle it."


* BaitTheDog: Leo Drummond at first presents himself as affable and courteous, volunteering to stand for Rudy while he takes his legal oath and appearing to be, at worst, a PunchClockVillain. The rest of the film and book then show him to be a SmugSnake and AmoralAttorney of the highest calibre, making it hard for the audience to feel especially sorry for him during his multiple setbacks (see ChewToy).



* BaitTheDog: Leo Drummond at first presents himself as affable and courteous, volunteering to stand for Rudy while he takes his legal oath and appearing to be, at worst, a PunchClockVillain. The rest of the film and book then show him to be a SmugSnake and AmoralAttorney of the highest calibre, making it hard for the audience to feel especially sorry for him during his multiple setbacks (see ChewToy).

Added DiffLines:

* BaitTheDog: Leo Drummond at first presents himself as affable and courteous, volunteering to stand for Rudy while he takes his legal oath and appearing to be, at worst, a PunchClockVillain. The rest of the film and book then show him to be a SmugSnake and AmoralAttorney of the highest calibre, making it hard for the audience to feel especially sorry for him during his multiple setbacks (see ChewToy).


* ShownTheirWork: A lot of detail is given about the down-and-dirty of litigation. Grisham knows his stuff.

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* ShownTheirWork: A lot of detail is given about the down-and-dirty of litigation. Grisham knows his stuff. The film is also no slouch, as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVp1HD0NTn4 this video analysis points out]].


--> '''Rudy''': So you never signed a deal with Jackie Lemancyzk?\\

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--> ---> '''Rudy''': So you never signed a deal with Jackie Lemancyzk?\\



'''Narrator''': I hold up the paper and the entire courtroom is waiting for a repeat of Section U, for me to pull out the agreement and catch another slimy corporate hack. [[RealityEnsues But I can't]]. I throw the useless paper onto my desk.\\

to:

'''Narrator''': I hold up the paper and the entire courtroom is waiting for a repeat of Section U, for me to pull out the agreement and catch another slimy corporate hack. [[RealityEnsues But I can't]].can't. I throw the useless paper onto my desk.\\



* BluffTheEavesdropper: Rudy's plan in the AmoralAttorney entry.

to:

* BluffTheEavesdropper: Rudy's plan in the AmoralAttorney entry.entry, in which [[spoiler:Tinley Britt taps Rudy's phones, so Rudy and Deck have someone impersonate a potential juror, making the opposing counsel look like fools when they try to confront the real juror.]] Of course, they could have taken this information to the judge and had them disbarred instead.

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