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Creator/AlfredBester's other famous novel besides ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'', ''The Demolished Man'' is a ReverseWhodunnit centering on Ben Reich's attempt to get away with the murder of a hated business rival and the efforts of psychic policeman Lincoln Powell to prove his guilt. The novel heavily inspired the psychic police of ''Series/BabylonFive'', although the ones in the novel are by far more benevolent. The name of the author was used for the [=PsiCop=] character played by Walter Koenig, along with possibly the DeathOfPersonality inspired from "Demolition", the "what do you want?" question by Morden, and an EarWorm being used to block telepathic scanning.

Also, it was the first winner of a Hugo Award.

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Creator/AlfredBester's other famous novel besides ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'', ''The Demolished Man'' is a ReverseWhodunnit centering on Ben Reich's attempt to get away with the murder of a hated business rival and the efforts of psychic policeman Lincoln Powell to prove his guilt. The novel heavily inspired the psychic police of ''Series/BabylonFive'', although the ones in the novel are by far more benevolent. The name of the author was used for the [=PsiCop=] character played by Walter Koenig, along with possibly the DeathOfPersonality inspired from "Demolition", the "what do you want?" question by Morden, and an EarWorm being used to block telepathic scanning.

Also, it
guilt.

It
was the first winner of a Hugo Award.

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* PsiBlast: Basic Neuro-Shock is a newly-developed psychic attack that knocks the target unconscious. Powell implies that it's a technique only taught to top-level Espers.

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* ThatsWhatIWouldDo: Reich guesses that Powell sneaked a look into his mind during his speech in Maria's study, because that's what Reich would have done if the situations were reversed.

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* PoliticallyIncorrectVillain: Reich casually refers to Maria's {{camp}} social secretaries as "fags".


%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.



* EarWorm: An {{in-universe}} example, which Reich uses to protect himself from telepathy.

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* EarWorm: An {{in-universe}} InUniverse example, which Reich uses to protect himself from telepathy.


* MutantDraftBoard: The Espers Guild which is based in part on something like a bar or medical association, especially in the sense of mandating using their powers for beneficial ends, but also dominates the lives of its members, including [[StalkerWithATestTube stipulating that they marry one of their own]], since the gift is hereditary. Senior Guild members also have to pay most of their income to support the Guild, which becomes a plot point when [[spoiler: a disgruntled Esper shows Reich how to defeat a mind scan in exchange for support in his campaign to reduce the Esper tithing rate.]]

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* MutantDraftBoard: The Espers Guild Guild, which is based in part on something like a bar or medical association, especially in the sense of mandating using their powers for beneficial ends, but also dominates the lives of its members, including [[StalkerWithATestTube [[ArrangedMarriage stipulating that they marry one of their own]], since the gift is hereditary. Senior Guild members also have to pay most of their income to support the Guild, which becomes a plot point when [[spoiler: a disgruntled Esper shows Reich how to defeat a mind scan in exchange for support in his campaign to reduce the Esper tithing rate.]]

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--> Eight, sir; seven, sir;\\
Six, sir; five, sir;\\
Four, sir; three, sir;\\
Two, sir; one!\\
Tenser, said the Tensor.\\
Tenser, said the Tensor.\\
Tension, apprehension,\\
And dissension have begun.


* AdaptationExpansion: The plot remains the same in the original magazine version and the novel, but some elements (such as Powell's NoodleIncident) only appear in the novel.

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* AdaptationExpansion: The plot remains the same in the original magazine version and the novel, but some elements (such as Powell's details (including those listed under INeverSaidItWasPoison and NoodleIncident) only appear in were added for the novel.

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* AdaptationExpansion: The plot remains the same in the original magazine version and the novel, but some elements (such as Powell's NoodleIncident) only appear in the novel.

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* JapanesePoliteness: In the magazine version, President T'Sung of the Esper Guild speaks in this manner.


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* NamedByTheAdaptation: Inverted. A lot of extras (like the guests at Maria's party) have names in the magazine version, but not the book.


* Letters2Numbers: Names like Wyg&, ¼maine, @kins and S&erson. The magazine version also does this to Tate ('T8'), Jackson ('$$son') and Sentry ('¢try').

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* Letters2Numbers: Names like Wyg&, ¼maine, @kins and S&erson. The magazine version also does this to Tate ('T8'), Jackson ('$$son') and Sentry ('¢try').('¢try'); there's even a reference to "[[Creator/MarkTwain Mark 2ain]]".


* AdaptationNameChange: In the original magazine version, Reich's company is called Sacrament. In the book it becomes Monarch.

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* AdaptationNameChange: In the original magazine version, Reich's company is called Sacrament. In the book it becomes Monarch. Some of the characters' names change, too, such as Preston Powell to Lincoln Powell and ¢try [Sentry] to Graham.



* Letters2Numbers: Names like Wyg&, ¼maine, @kins and S&erson. The magazine version also does this to Tate ('T8') and Jackson ('$$son').

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* Letters2Numbers: Names like Wyg&, ¼maine, @kins and S&erson. The magazine version also does this to Tate ('T8') and ('T8'), Jackson ('$$son').('$$son') and Sentry ('¢try').

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* HaveAGayOldTime: In the original magazine version of the story, the term 'Panty' is frequently used as a shortened version of 'Emotional Pantograph' (a cross between theatre and what today might be called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4D_film 4D film]]). The word was wisely dropped from the book version.

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* AsYouKnow: Near the beginning, Monarch's chief of personnel recapitulates at length the rules of telepathy in the setting -- something anybody in 24th-century New York would know, but the readers don't. Reich's secretary [[LampshadeHanging hangs a lampshade on it]], complaining that everyone knows what he's saying, and would he kindly get to the point?


* AdaptationNameChange: In the original magazine version, Reich's company is called Sacrament. In the book it becomes Monarch.



* Letters2Numbers: Names like Wyg&, ¼maine, @kins and S&erson.

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* Letters2Numbers: Names like Wyg&, ¼maine, @kins and S&erson. The magazine version also does this to Tate ('T8') and Jackson ('$$son').

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