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* TheFilmOfTheBook: [[CaptainObvious The movie is a film adaptation of the book.]]

to:

* TheFilmOfTheBook: [[CaptainObvious The movie is a film adaptation of the book.]]


* AdaptationInducedPlothole: Why the ''hell'' are there people whose sole job it is to deliver spoken messages on foot in a city with telephones? (Telephones with answering machines, no less!)

to:

* AdaptationInducedPlothole: Why The movie adds a plot point about Lina and Doon's parents that gives them a little backstory they didn't have in the book, detailing a failed escape plan. There would be nothing wrong with this, except that the thing that clues Lina and Doon into the story is an old recorded message on an answering machine, which begs the question of why the ''hell'' are there people whose sole job it is to deliver spoken messages on foot were messengers in a city with telephones? (Telephones with answering machines, no less!)telephones in the first place.



* IgnoredExpert: Doon is the only one convinced that the eponymous city's generator is beyond repair, and it needs to be overhauled, or the city abandoned. Naturally, the older generation tells him to shut up. It turns out he and Lina are {{Legacy Character}}s (of sorts) to their fathers, who were part of a cabal who foresaw the collapse ''years ago''. Her father died trying to find a solution.

to:

* IgnoredExpert: Doon is the only one convinced that the eponymous city's generator is beyond repair, and it needs to be overhauled, or the city abandoned. Naturally, the older generation tells him to shut up. It turns out he and Lina are {{Legacy Character}}s (of sorts) to their fathers, who were part of a cabal who foresaw the collapse ''years ago''. Her father died trying to find a solution.



Interestingly, both a comedic and a poignant example of this particular trope; comedic because it's the punchline to a repeated catchphrase ("Not my job!") and poignant [[spoiler:because it's not clear what happens to Sul after he helps Lina, Doon, and Poppy escape]].

to:

** Interestingly, both a comedic and a poignant example of this particular trope; comedic because it's the punchline to a repeated catchphrase ("Not my job!") and poignant [[spoiler:because it's not clear what happens to Sul after he helps Lina, Doon, and Poppy escape]].
escape]].



* MalevolentArchitecture: The film has an escape route (meant to eventually be followed by all the inhabitants, no less) that requires activating a complex machine that moves around small boats, destabilizes a power reactor, generates a powerful water current and finally blasts the hapless citizens in the aforementioned tiny boats through a waterslide course any entertainment company would pay millions for (replete with suspended structure). You'd think they could have built, I dunno, ''an elevator'' instead... It might have been justified if not for the waterslide, since the place was already past its expiration date anyway.

to:

* MalevolentArchitecture: The film has an escape route (meant to eventually be followed by all the inhabitants, no less) that requires activating a complex machine that moves around small boats, destabilizes a power reactor, generates a powerful water current and finally blasts the hapless citizens in the aforementioned tiny boats through a waterslide course any entertainment company would pay millions for (replete with suspended structure). You'd think they could have built, I dunno, say, ''an elevator'' instead... It might have been justified if not for the waterslide, since the place was already past its expiration date anyway.


''The Books of Ember'' is a four-book series about the adventures of Lina Mayfleet and Doon Harrow, who live in the UndergroundCity of Ember, which relies on lightbulbs to keep the town lighted and running. However, the lightbulbs are beginning to dull and food/rations are running out in the city; it won't be long until the entire city is cloaked in eternal darkness and becomes poverty-stricken. One day, Lina finds a letter (which is unrecognizable at first because her little sister Poppy chewed on it), which may possibly lead the citizens out of Ember. However, Lina and Doon have to confront a conspiracy that wishes to keep the truth under wraps...

Made into a film in 2008 starring Creator/SaoirseRonan and Creator/BillMurray.

to:

''The Books of Ember'' is a four-book post-apocalyptic children's series (believe it or not) that follows two children as they learn more about their city, the adventures titular City of Ember, its past, and their world.

The first book, ''The City of Ember'', introduces us to
Lina Mayfleet and Doon Harrow, who live in the UndergroundCity of Ember, which Ember. The city is surrounded by darkness in all directions and so relies on lightbulbs a hydroelectric generator to keep the town lighted alight and running. However, the lightbulbs are generator is beginning to dull fail, causing blackouts that are increasing in both frequency and food/rations are running out length. At the same time, the food left in the city; it city is beginning to grow scarce, without any way to replenish its stores. It won't be long until the entire city is fails and becomes cloaked in eternal darkness and becomes poverty-stricken. One day, darkness. In the midst of this chaos, Lina finds discovers an old note that appears to tell of a letter (which is unrecognizable at first because her way out of Ember. Unfortunately, it was badly damaged by Lina's little sister Poppy chewed chewing on it), which may possibly lead it, making the citizens out of Ember. However, note difficult to decipher. Meanwhile, Lina and Doon have to confront a conspiracy that wishes to keep the truth under wraps...

Made into The book was released in 2003 and became surprisingly popular. A sequel titled ''The People of Sparks'' was released the following year and picks up right where ''Ember'' leaves off. A prequel to the series called ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' was released in 2006 and focuses on a different set of characters. 2008 saw the release of a film in 2008 adaptation of the first book, starring Creator/SaoirseRonan and Creator/BillMurray.
Creator/BillMurray, as well as the last book in the series, ''The Diamond of Darkhold'', which takes place after ''Sparks''.



[[AC: Books in the Series]]
# ''The City of Ember''
# ''The People of Sparks''
# ''The Prophet of Yonwood''
# ''The Diamond of Darkhold''

to:

[[AC: Books [[AC:Books in the Series]]
# ''The City of Ember''
Ember'' (2003)
# ''The People of Sparks''
Sparks'' (2004)
# ''The Prophet of Yonwood''
Yonwood'' (2006)
# ''The Diamond of Darkhold''
Darkhold'' (2008)



!!This book series provides examples of:

to:

!!This !!The book series provides examples of:



* IndestructibleEdible: Ember has existed for 241 years but still has some canned food that was stocked there are the beginning (and apparently it's still fit to eat).

to:

* IndestructibleEdible: Ember has existed for 241 years but still has some canned food that was stocked there are at the beginning (and is apparently it's still fit to eat).


Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationInducedPlothole: Why the ''hell'' are there people whose sole job it is to deliver spoken messages on foot in a city with telephones? (Telephones with answering machines, no less!)


* TheScrappy: This would be Poppy, particularly in the film adaptation. Granted, much of her noisome behaviors - eating the directions, showing the general survival instincts of a turnip - could be excused by the fact she's quite young, her ability to somehow create obstacles and disruptions everywhere she goes is practically legendary. Doesn't even rise to the level of being The Load because she never actually deliberately contributes anything to the main characters' efforts.


* TheScrappy: This would be Poppy, particularly in the film adaptation. Granted, much of her noisome behaviors - eating the directions, showing the general survival instincts of a turnip - could be excused by the fact she's quite young, her ability to somehow create obstacles and disruptions everywhere she goes is practically legendary. Doesn't even rise to the level of being The Load because she never actually deliberately contributes anything to the main characters' efforts.


Added DiffLines:

* TheScrappy: This would be Poppy, particularly in the film adaptation. Granted, much of her noisome behaviors - eating the directions, showing the general survival instincts of a turnip - could be excused by the fact she's quite young, her ability to somehow create obstacles and disruptions everywhere she goes is practically legendary. Doesn't even rise to the level of being The Load because she never actually deliberately contributes anything to the main characters' efforts.

Added DiffLines:

* TheScrappy: This would be Poppy, particularly in the film adaptation. Granted, much of her noisome behaviors - eating the directions, showing the general survival instincts of a turnip - could be excused by the fact she's quite young, her ability to somehow create obstacles and disruptions everywhere she goes is practically legendary. Doesn't even rise to the level of being The Load because she never actually deliberately contributes anything to the main characters' efforts.


* WorldWarIII: The Four Wars aren't given any individual names, but from what we learn in the books, they sure seem to have been World Wars. If ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' is anything to go by, the first of these wars was between the USA and a group called the Phalanx Nations, and went nuclear pretty fast. These wars, combined with [[ThePlague The 3 Plagues]], are what knocked civilization back to pre-industrial levels.

to:

* WorldWarIII: The Four Wars aren't given any individual names, but from what we learn in the books, they sure seem to have been World Wars. If ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' is anything to go by, the first of these wars was between the USA and a group called the Phalanx Nations, and went nuclear pretty fast. These wars, combined with [[ThePlague The 3 Three Plagues]], are what knocked civilization back to pre-industrial levels.



* ExitPursuedByABear: At the end of the film, Mayor Cole is eaten by a [[RodentsOfUnusualSize giant mole]].

to:

* ExitPursuedByABear: At the end of the film, Mayor [[spoiler:Mayor Cole is eaten by a [[RodentsOfUnusualSize giant mole]].]]


Not to be confused with the {{Literature/Emberverse}} series.



* AccidentallyBrokeTheMacGuffin:
** In ''The City of Ember'', the "Instructions for Egress" were mostly ruined by Lina's baby sister, Poppy, chewing on them; this turned what would have otherwise been a very quick and simple quest into a much more difficult and time-consuming ordeal as they tried to piece together what remained of the instructions.
** The "Instructions for Egress" had been kept in a safe in a special place of honor for years until about fifty or sixty years earlier, the then mayor took it home and tried to open it, never replacing the safe but instead, having it shoved into a closet to be forgotten and unseen even as its timed lock opened.
*** Slightly tweaked in the film adaptation; the box was meant to be passed from mayor to mayor, but the box was lost when one mayor died while in the role, with his family inheriting the box without knowing what it was for.
** In ''The Diamond Of Darkhold'', [[spoiler:Doon throws the diamond of Darkhold at a pack of wolves to save Lina. The diamond hits the rock that Lina is standing on and shatters into hundreds of pieces. Luckily, the diamond is only a sample. There are exactly one thousand diamonds in a hidden room in the cave. The diamonds are ancient technology that turns solar power into electricity]].

to:

* %% I'm not sure that any of these examples for AccidentallyBrokeTheMacGuffin qualify. I'm commenting them out for now.
%%*
AccidentallyBrokeTheMacGuffin:
** %%** In ''The City of Ember'', the "Instructions for Egress" were mostly ruined by Lina's baby sister, Poppy, chewing on them; this turned what would have otherwise been a very quick and simple quest into a much more difficult and time-consuming ordeal as they tried to piece together what remained of the instructions.
** %%** The "Instructions for Egress" had been kept in a safe in a special place of honor for years until about fifty or sixty years earlier, the then mayor took it home and tried to open it, never replacing the safe but instead, having it shoved into a closet to be forgotten and unseen even as its timed lock opened.
*** %%*** Slightly tweaked in the film adaptation; the box was meant to be passed from mayor to mayor, but the box was lost when one mayor died while in the role, with his family inheriting the box without knowing what it was for.
** %%** In ''The Diamond Of Darkhold'', [[spoiler:Doon throws the diamond of Darkhold at a pack of wolves to save Lina. The diamond hits the rock that Lina is standing on and shatters into hundreds of pieces. Luckily, the diamond is only a sample. There are exactly one thousand diamonds in a hidden room in the cave. The diamonds are ancient technology that turns solar power into electricity]].



* AfterTheEnd: [[spoiler:Human society was destroyed by the Disaster, a combination of "the Four Wars and the Three Plagues". However, the titular city was built underground as a safehold for human culture and survives for 200-odd years after the war ended... [[OhCrap and then the lights start going out]]]]. By the end of the series, [[spoiler:people start rebuilding on the surface and things are looking up]].

to:

* AfterTheEnd: [[spoiler:Human society was destroyed by The first book of the Disaster, a combination of "the Four Wars and series implies that this is the Three Plagues". However, the titular city was built underground setting, though exactly what type of disaster occurred remained (intentionally) ambiguous. ''The People of Sparks'' reveals that [[spoiler:most of humanity died as a safehold for result of four wars and three plagues, leading to a severe breakdown of human culture and survives for 200-odd years after the war ended... [[OhCrap and then the lights start going out]]]]. society.]] By the end of the series, [[spoiler:people start rebuilding on the surface and things are looking up]].



* ApocalypseHow: Class 2. In the twist ending of ''The City of Ember'', [[spoiler:it turns out that the eponymous city is an underground enclave built to weather a series of nuclear wars and deadly plagues. The outside world has regressed to pre-industrial levels. However, the people are still fairly well off, and, with the help of the Emberites and a few caches of LostTechnology, are starting anew by the end of the series]].

to:

* ApocalypseHow: Class 2. In the twist ending of ''The City of Ember'', [[spoiler:it turns out is revealed that the eponymous city is an underground enclave built to weather a series of nuclear wars and deadly plagues. The outside world has regressed to pre-industrial levels. However, the people are still fairly well off, and, with the help of the Emberites and levels, making this apocalypse a few caches of LostTechnology, are starting anew by the end of the series]].societal collapse on a planetary scale.]]



* ConvenientlyInterruptedDocument: As seen above in the AccidentallyBrokeTheMacGuffin entry, Poppy found the paper with the instructions on how to leave and chewed on them, making parts of it unreadable.

to:

* ConvenientlyInterruptedDocument: As seen above in the AccidentallyBrokeTheMacGuffin entry, Poppy found the paper with the instructions on how to leave and chewed on them, up the Instructions for Egress, making large parts of it unreadable.



* EarthAllAlong: In ''The City of Ember'', the city turns out to be ''underground'' on Earth. Human beings lived there for centuries; the idea was to protect them from nuclear war, but they lost the evacuation instructions years ago, and no one was around to tell them that the apocalypse was over and they could all go home now.
* EternalEngine: ''Ember'' in ''The City of Ember'' is not ''all'' engine, but between the generator and the pipeworks a ''lot'' of it is made up of constantly running machinery.
* FirstTimeInTheSun: At the end of ''The City of Ember'', the main characters find themselves on the surface at night, just in time to see the sun rise.
* FreedomFromChoice: ''The City of Ember'' has a bit of this although, it was shown that the lot-drawing didn't actually matter (it was touted as a sort of sacred infallible system, but people could swap their drawings).
** The point of that system was to allow people to get jobs they liked more, through trade, while making sure someone ended up doing the bad jobs no one wanted but had to be done.
* GoodIsNotNice: Hoyt [=McCoy=] from ''The Prophet of Yonwood''.

to:

* EarthAllAlong: In ''The City of Ember'', the city turns out to be ''underground'' on Earth. Human beings lived there for centuries; the idea was to protect them from nuclear war, centuries, but they lost the evacuation instructions years ago, before anyone even knew they existed and no one was around to tell them that the apocalypse was over and they could all go home now.
* EternalEngine: ''Ember'' Ember in ''The City of Ember'' is not ''all'' engine, but between the generator and the pipeworks a ''lot'' of it is made up of constantly running machinery.
* FirstTimeInTheSun: At [[spoiler:At the end of ''The City of Ember'', the main characters find themselves on the surface at night, just in time to see the sun rise.
rise.]]
* FreedomFromChoice: ''The City of Ember'' has a bit of this although, this, although it was shown that the lot-drawing didn't actually matter (it was touted as a sort of sacred infallible system, but people could swap their drawings).
**
drawings). The point of that system was to allow allowed people to get jobs they liked more, through trade, while making sure someone ended up doing the bad jobs no one wanted but had to be done.
* GoodIsNotNice: Hoyt [=McCoy=] from ''The Prophet of Yonwood''.Yonwood'':



* SmallSecludedWorld: ''The City of Ember'', [[spoiler:was built underground as a refuge from a nuclear apocalypse]], but the instructions for escape were lost long ago, and now the city's supplies are running out.

to:

* SmallSecludedWorld: ''The City of Ember'', Ember'' [[spoiler:was built underground as a refuge from a nuclear apocalypse]], but the instructions for escape were lost long ago, and now the city's supplies are running out.



* WorldWarIII: The books are set 200 years after World Wars III, IV, V, and VI. If ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' is anything to go by, the first of "The 4 Wars" was between the USA and a group called the Phalanx Nations, and went nuclear pretty fast. These wars, combined with [[ThePlague The 3 Plagues]], are what knocked civilization back to pre-industrial levels.

to:

* WorldWarIII: The books are set 200 years after Four Wars aren't given any individual names, but from what we learn in the books, they sure seem to have been World Wars III, IV, V, and VI. Wars. If ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' is anything to go by, the first of "The 4 Wars" these wars was between the USA and a group called the Phalanx Nations, and went nuclear pretty fast. These wars, combined with [[ThePlague The 3 Plagues]], are what knocked civilization back to pre-industrial levels.



* AssholeVictim: The Mayor has his own safe room, full of enough food to feed the entire city. When he locks himself in there accidentally with a giant crawler, it's hard to feel sorry for him.

to:

* AdaptationDeviation: The giant insects and moles weren't in ''any'' of the books, but they were added into the movie, possibly to show the effects of radiation on the wildlife.
* AssholeVictim: The Mayor has his own safe room, full of enough food to feed the entire city. When he locks himself in there accidentally with a and can't escape [[spoiler:before the giant crawler, mole eats him]], it's hard to feel sorry for him.



* DeathByAdaptation: [[spoiler:Mayor Cole]], who survived the book of ''The City of Ember'' but died in the movie.
* DiesDifferentlyInAdaptation: [[spoiler:In the book, Lina's father simply died of a coughing sickness that was going around. In the movie, however, he died during an escape attempt with Loris, Doon's father.]]
** [[spoiler:Mayor Cole]] is potentially another example of this, depending on how you look at it. [[spoiler:He survived the first book, but the second book reveals that he, Looper, and his cronies all drowned in the river while trying to escape Ember. This differs from his death in the film adaptation of the first book, where he is eaten by a giant mole.]]



* TheXofY: "The City of Ember"


%% * AdultsAreUseless: Most of the important accomplishments in the series are achieved by children (specifically, Lina and Doon in ''The City of Ember'', ''The People of Sparks'', and ''The Diamond of Darkhold'', and Nickie and Grover in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'') with minimal parental supervision.

to:

%% * AdultsAreUseless: Most While most of the important accomplishments adults in the series are achieved by aren't evil, they seem quite complacent to sit around while the city of Ember dies, they try to incite a war that could only lead to disaster, and they just accept the words of Mrs. Beeson without a hint of skepticism or critical thought. It's the children (specifically, Lina of the series who are willing to challenge the status quo and Doon in ''The City try to change the course of Ember'', ''The People of Sparks'', and ''The Diamond of Darkhold'', and Nickie and Grover in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'') with minimal parental supervision.events for the better.



%% * BeneathTheEarth: The (underground) city of Ember, obviously.

to:

%% * BeneathTheEarth: The (underground) Ember is an underground city of Ember, obviously. that was built to be self-sustaining for about 200 years. It starts failing when it lives long past its expiration date.



%% * BrattyHalfPint: Torren, very much so, in ''The People of Sparks''. He's mellowed out quite a bit by ''The Diamond of Darkhold'', though.
* ChekhovsGun: That guy in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' running those weird experiments [[spoiler:to contact aliens? HE SUCCEEDED. They're the mysterious new star in ''The Diamond of Darkhold'']].
%% * ChildProdigy: Doon, who studies bugs and figures out a lot about how electricity works.

to:

%% * BrattyHalfPint: Torren, very much so, Torren is a hotheaded selfish child who shows no sympathy or concern for the refugees from Ember. He even goes so far as to blame an innocent Emberite when Torren himself destroys two crates of tomatoes. Why does he hate the Emberites so much? Because a few are staying in ''The People of Sparks''. He's mellowed his room and in his house. He mellows out quite a bit by ''The Diamond of Darkhold'', though.
however.
* ChekhovsGun: That guy in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' running those weird experiments [[spoiler:to contact aliens? HE SUCCEEDED. They're He succeeded. The aliens send a spacecraft to Earth, the mysterious new star in ''The Diamond of Darkhold'']].
%% * ChildProdigy: Doon, Doon is a studious child who studies bugs and figures out keeps a lot book full of information he learns about how electricity works.insects and other bugs, creates a functioning generator that powers a lightbulb, and is one of the first people post-Disaster to actually learn anything about electricity.



* MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness: ''Ember'' and ''Sparks'' are both solid 5.5s; the only technologies that appear are devices that already exist today. ''Yonwood'' and ''Darkhold'' would both rank 4 or 4.5; the "crack in the sky" and [[spoiler:solar-powered diamonds]] are definitely speculative technologies as opposed to real, existing ones, but they aren't the main focus of the plot.



%% * ReptilesAreAbhorrent: Mrs. Beeson certainly thinks so, and indirectly cites this trope when Nickie tells her that Grover owns snakes in his shed.

to:

%% * ReptilesAreAbhorrent: Mrs. Beeson certainly thinks so, and indirectly cites this trope when Nickie tells her that Grover owns snakes in his shed. She concludes that because of the evil nature of snakes, anyone who owns them must be a sinner.



%% * ShrinkingViolet: Amanda (Prophet of Yonwood), who doesn't have the strength to stand up to Mrs. Beeson and ends up helping her.



%% * TheFilmOfTheBook:

to:

%% * TheFilmOfTheBook:TheFilmOfTheBook: [[CaptainObvious The movie is a film adaptation of the book.]]



%% * SirNotAppearingInThisTrailer: Oscar-winning actors Tim Robbins & Martin Landau play a much bigger role in the finished film than in any of the adverts for it.
%% * TheXofY

to:

%% * SirNotAppearingInThisTrailer: Oscar-winning actors Tim Robbins & Martin Landau play a much bigger role important roles in the finished film than film, but they hardly appear in any of the adverts advertising for it.
%% * TheXofYTheXofY: "The City of Ember"


* BlindObedience: In ''The City of Ember'' most people treat the mayor as a pretty infallible and sensible authority figure, which he abused to his gain. Though their city was breaking down and the power plant to their TerminallyDependentSociety was nearing failure he managed to keep almost everyone content. The protagonists were some of the few to see the problem and fought to find a way out.

to:

* BlindObedience: BlindObedience:
**
In ''The City of Ember'' most people treat the mayor as a pretty infallible and sensible authority figure, which he abused to his gain. Though their city was breaking down and the power plant to their TerminallyDependentSociety was nearing failure he managed to keep almost everyone content. The protagonists were some of the few to see the problem and fought to find a way out.out.
** UpToEleven in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'', where the main theme of the book is the dangers of blind obedience. The citizens of Yonwood take the words of Althea Towers as absolute '''gospel''', going so far as to shun anyone who doesn't follow the least of her (rather strict) commandments. They believe that ridding the community of evil will protect them from the oncoming apocalypse, [[spoiler:but it turns out to all be in waste. Althea ''wasn't even trying to give moral commandments to the community'', and the war they were preparing for wouldn't happen for fifty more years.]]


** Lina Mayfleet, a messenger whose job requires speed. Lampshaded in the film adaptation by a comment from the mayor when Lina visits his office with a message: “May you feet be fleet.”

to:

** Lina Mayfleet, a talented runner (which comes in handy when she becomes a messenger whose job requires speed. [[spoiler:and later a fugitive]]). Lampshaded in the film adaptation by a comment from the mayor when Lina visits his office with a message: office: “May you your feet be fleet.”


* MissingMom: Lina Mayfleet's mom died when her younger sister Poppy was born. But her friend Doon Harrow has mom is ''never'' mentioned in the series with no explanation whatsoever. Many fans' favorite excuse is that she died when Doon was young.

to:

* MissingMom: Lina Mayfleet's mom mother died when her younger sister Poppy was born. But her friend while giving birth to Lina's little sister, Poppy. Doon Harrow has mom is ''never'' Harrow's mother isn't even mentioned in the series with no explanation whatsoever. Many fans' favorite excuse series, and her absence is that she died when Doon was young.never explained.


** In a way, Ember itself. Its supply of stored food is finite, as is the stock of light bulbs (and thus the operability of the greenhouse). To make matters worse, the Generator is gradually breaking down, causing increasingly frequent blackouts.
** Lina Mayfleet, as she wanted to be a messenger, which requires her to be fast.

to:

** In a way, Ember itself. Its supply of stored food is finite, as is the stock of and Sparks: two places providing light bulbs (and thus the operability of the greenhouse). To make matters worse, the Generator is gradually breaking down, causing increasingly frequent blackouts.
in a dark, post-apocalyptic world.
** Lina Mayfleet, as she wanted to be a messenger, which messenger whose job requires her to speed. Lampshaded in the film adaptation by a comment from the mayor when Lina visits his office with a message: “May you feet be fast.fleet.”



** The terrorist nation in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' is called the Phalanx Nations.

to:

** The terrorist nation organization in ''The Prophet of Yonwood'' is called the Phalanx Nations.


* IndestructibleEdible: In ''The City of Ember'', despite having been underground for 241 years, the city still had some canned food, including fruit cocktail and other canned fruit that had been stocked there in the beginning.
* KarmicDeath: It's revealed that [[spoiler: the mayor drowned in the river while trying to leave Ember ahead of everyone else]].

to:

* IndestructibleEdible: In ''The City of Ember'', despite having been underground Ember has existed for 241 years, the city years but still had has some canned food, including fruit cocktail and other canned fruit food that had been was stocked there in are the beginning.
beginning (and apparently it's still fit to eat).
* KarmicDeath: It's revealed in ''The People of Sparks'' that [[spoiler: the mayor and his accomplices, including Looper, drowned in the river while trying to leave Ember ahead of everyone else]].



** In ''The City of Ember'', the simple fact that the surface world exists becomes this, as does the existence of animals, candles, matches, the sun, the sky, and many other things.
** In ''The People of Sparks'', the Emberites don't know that the Earth is round, and don't know things like animals, trees, trucks, rain, seasons, and gods.

to:

** In ''The City of Ember'', the simple fact that the surface world exists becomes this, this trope, as does the existence of most animals, candles, matches, the sun, the sky, and many other things.
** In ''The People of Sparks'', the Emberites don't know that the Earth is round, and don't know about things like animals, trees, trucks, rain, seasons, and gods.


* {{Courier}}: Lina Mayfleet who is excited about being a messenger in ''The City of Ember''.

to:

* {{Courier}}: Lina Mayfleet Mayfleet, who is excited about being becomes a messenger in ''The City of Ember''.Ember'' [[spoiler:and again at the end of ''The Diamond of Darkhold'']].

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