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* AlwaysSomeoneBetter: Subverted; not even Hercule Poirot's [[spoiler: nonexistent]] brother Achille is smarter than he is!

to:

* AlwaysSomeoneBetter: Subverted; not even Hercule Poirot's [[spoiler: nonexistent]] brother Achille is smarter than he is!is! [[spoiler: Because he's nonexistent, for a start.]]

Added DiffLines:

* DecapitationStrike: Hercule disguises himself as his non-existent brother Achille, in order to trick the titular group into thinking that Hercule is still at large, so that they can be taken out all at once in the planned operation.

Added DiffLines:

* FourIsDeath: Literally. Number Four is the Destroyer, the assassin of the group.


The book is adapted for the final season of ''Series/{{Poirot}}'', [[InNameOnly with a vastly differing plot]], due to the screenwriter finding the novel to be an "unadaptable mess".

to:

The In 2013, the book is was adapted for the thirteenth and final season of ''Series/{{Poirot}}'', [[InNameOnly with a vastly differing plot]], due to the screenwriter finding the novel to be an "unadaptable mess".
"an almost unadaptable mess". Tropes for this adaptation are listed on the series page.


* YellowPeril: Unfortunately, there's a bit of this. The mastermind of The Big Four is Chinese (although the other three are Caucasian), among other things.

! Tropes found in the TV series:
* AdaptedOut: Due to the massive changes of the storyline (which scales down the scope of the affair), the cast is considerably pared down. Among the deleted characters are Achille (the [[spoiler:fake twin brother of Hercule Poirot]]) and Countess Vera Rossakoff.
* AdaptationalHeroism: In the TV adaptation, 3 of the Big Four are actually innocent.
* AndIMustScream: The Big Four makes use of a sedative that paralyses the nerves while retaining the person's consciousness. One victim was drugged and shoved into a fireplace to slowly burn to death.
* AscendedExtra: In the books, [[spoiler:Flossie Monroe]] is only one of the many {{Flat Character}}s whose sole purpose is to provide a single clue to aid the investigation. In the adaptation, she [[spoiler:is the object of affection of Claud Darrell, whose unrequited love for her]] is the reason why the Big Four was even founded.
* CanonForeigner: Lawrence Tysoe the journalist does not exist in the original material.
* DeathFromAbove: During the final confrontation, [[spoiler:Claude Darrell tries to shoot at Poirot]], at which point [[spoiler:Tysoe]] drops a curtain on the former and killing him.
* DemotedToExtra: Hastings served as Poirot's primary sidekick during the investigation in the books. Here, Poirot is mostly aided by Tysoe and Japp, while Hastings plays absolutely no role in the case, appearing only [[spoiler:after Poirot's "death"]].
* FromNobodyToNightmare: [[spoiler:Number Four is just a common actor from a no-name company]], with neither wealth, fame or position of power. His role as the Big Four's mastermind turns him to a global threat.
* InNameOnly: The TV episode is a very loose adaptation of the novel, and the villain's motives and actions are completely different from the books.
* IntrepidReporter: Tysoe causes a lot of stir by publishing news about the Big Four's activities in spite of Poirot's warning that he be discreet.
* LoveMakesYouCrazy: [[spoiler:Claude Darrell falls in love with Flossie Monroe, who told him that he's not good or famous enough for her]]. He then forms the Big Four to win her affection.
* ShipTease: In the final scene, Flossie Monroe accepts Tysoe's invitation for lunch, and the two leaves hand-in-hand
* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives. Also the case with the three Big Four that are innocent.
* UnwittingPawn: Tysoe receives "classified information" about the Big Four from dubious sources. Sure enough, his informant is [[spoiler:actually Claude Darrell, the mastermind himself]], who deliberately fed the enthusiastic journalist with such incredible news in order to stir worldwide panic.

to:

* YellowPeril: Unfortunately, there's a bit of this. The mastermind of The Big Four is Chinese (although the other three are Caucasian), among other things.

! Tropes found in the TV series:
* AdaptedOut: Due to the massive changes of the storyline (which scales down the scope of the affair), the cast is considerably pared down. Among the deleted characters are Achille (the [[spoiler:fake twin brother of Hercule Poirot]]) and Countess Vera Rossakoff.
* AdaptationalHeroism: In the TV adaptation, 3 of the Big Four are actually innocent.
* AndIMustScream: The Big Four makes use of a sedative that paralyses the nerves while retaining the person's consciousness. One victim was drugged and shoved into a fireplace to slowly burn to death.
* AscendedExtra: In the books, [[spoiler:Flossie Monroe]] is only one of the many {{Flat Character}}s whose sole purpose is to provide a single clue to aid the investigation. In the adaptation, she [[spoiler:is the object of affection of Claud Darrell, whose unrequited love for her]] is the reason why the Big Four was even founded.
* CanonForeigner: Lawrence Tysoe the journalist does not exist in the original material.
* DeathFromAbove: During the final confrontation, [[spoiler:Claude Darrell tries to shoot at Poirot]], at which point [[spoiler:Tysoe]] drops a curtain on the former and killing him.
* DemotedToExtra: Hastings served as Poirot's primary sidekick during the investigation in the books. Here, Poirot is mostly aided by Tysoe and Japp, while Hastings plays absolutely no role in the case, appearing only [[spoiler:after Poirot's "death"]].
* FromNobodyToNightmare: [[spoiler:Number Four is just a common actor from a no-name company]], with neither wealth, fame or position of power. His role as the Big Four's mastermind turns him to a global threat.
* InNameOnly: The TV episode is a very loose adaptation of the novel, and the villain's motives and actions are completely different from the books.
* IntrepidReporter: Tysoe causes a lot of stir by publishing news about the Big Four's activities in spite of Poirot's warning that he be discreet.
* LoveMakesYouCrazy: [[spoiler:Claude Darrell falls in love with Flossie Monroe, who told him that he's not good or famous enough for her]]. He then forms the Big Four to win her affection.
* ShipTease: In the final scene, Flossie Monroe accepts Tysoe's invitation for lunch, and the two leaves hand-in-hand
* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives. Also the case with the three Big Four that are innocent.
* UnwittingPawn: Tysoe receives "classified information" about the Big Four from dubious sources. Sure enough, his informant is [[spoiler:actually Claude Darrell, the mastermind himself]], who deliberately fed the enthusiastic journalist with such incredible news in order to stir worldwide panic.
things.


As you might have seen by the above summary, this particular installment is considered...[[OddballInTheSeries strange]] for a Poirot novel. Creator/AgathaChristie apparently wrote it [[CreatorBreakdown on the heels of a divorce and in need of money]].

to:

As you might have seen by the above summary, this particular installment is considered...[[OddballInTheSeries strange]] for a Poirot novel. Creator/AgathaChristie apparently wrote it [[CreatorBreakdown on the heels of a divorce and in need of money]]. \n Many of the chapters were originally short stories that she tied together with the overall plot.

Added DiffLines:

* AndIMustScream: The Big Four makes use of a sedative that paralyses the nerves while retaining the person's consciousness. One victim was drugged and shoved into a fireplace to slowly burn to death.


* ActionizedSequel: This novel is decidedly more action-packed than any other Poirot outing, including an unusually high body count, multiple characters employing disguises, explosions, stun gases, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking fainting episodes]]. Oh, and there's that scene when Poirot and Hastings climb out of an upstairs window down some ivy...that isn't something you see everyday in Agatha Christie's works.

to:

* ActionizedSequel: This novel is decidedly more action-packed than any other Poirot outing, including an unusually high body count, multiple characters employing disguises, explosions, stun gases, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking fainting episodes]]. Oh, and there's that scene when Poirot and Hastings climb out of an upstairs window down some ivy...that isn't something you see everyday every day in Agatha Christie's works.


[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poirot___the_big_four_1e.jpg]]
%%[[caption-width-right:200:some caption text]]



! Tropes found in the novel:

to:

! Tropes found in the novel:
----
!!This novel provides examples of:


* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives.

to:

* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives. Also the case with the three Big Four that are innocent.


! Tropes found in the books:

to:

! Tropes found in the books:TV series:



* LastMinuteHookup: In the final scene, Flossie Monroe accepts Tysoe's invitation for lunch, and the two leaves hand-in-hand, even though they've only just met during the final confrontation with the Big Four. Mind you, [[spoiler:the reason Claude Darrell committed all the crimes he did was because Flossie rejected his invitation for dinner]].


Added DiffLines:

* ShipTease: In the final scene, Flossie Monroe accepts Tysoe's invitation for lunch, and the two leaves hand-in-hand


* DemotedToExtra: Hastings served as Poirot's primary sidekick during the investigation in the books. Here, Poirot is mostly aided by Tysoe and Japp, while Hastings plays absolutely no role in the case, appearing only [[spoiler:after Poirot's "death"]].



* LastMinuteHookup: In the final scene, Flossie Monroe accepts Tysoe's invitation for lunch, and the two leaves hand-in-hand, even though they've only just met during the final confrontation with the Big Four. Mind you, [[spoiler:the reason Claude Darrell committed all the crimes he did was because Flossie rejected his invitation for dinner]].



* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives.

to:

* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives.lives.
* UnwittingPawn: Tysoe receives "classified information" about the Big Four from dubious sources. Sure enough, his informant is [[spoiler:actually Claude Darrell, the mastermind himself]], who deliberately fed the enthusiastic journalist with such incredible news in order to stir worldwide panic.


* AdaptatedOut: Due to the massive changes of the storyline (which scales down the scope of the affair), the cast is considerably pared down. Among the deleted characters are Achille (the [[spoiler:fake twin brother of Hercule Poirot]]) and Countess Vera Rossakoff.

to:

* AdaptatedOut: AdaptedOut: Due to the massive changes of the storyline (which scales down the scope of the affair), the cast is considerably pared down. Among the deleted characters are Achille (the [[spoiler:fake twin brother of Hercule Poirot]]) and Countess Vera Rossakoff.



* InterpidReporter: Tysoe causes a lot of stir by publishing news about the Big Four's activities in spite of Poirot's warning that he be discreet.

to:

* InterpidReporter: IntrepidReporter: Tysoe causes a lot of stir by publishing news about the Big Four's activities in spite of Poirot's warning that he be discreet.


As you might have seen by the above summary, this particular installment is considered...[[OddballInTheSeries strange]] for a Poirot novel. Creator/AgathaChristie apparently wrote it [[CreatorBreakdown on the heels of a divorce and in need of money]]. Opinions are divided on whether it's better viewed as light entertainment or skipped altogether.

! This novel contains the following Tropes

to:

As you might have seen by the above summary, this particular installment is considered...[[OddballInTheSeries strange]] for a Poirot novel. Creator/AgathaChristie apparently wrote it [[CreatorBreakdown on the heels of a divorce and in need of money]]. Opinions are divided on whether it's better viewed as light entertainment or skipped altogether.

! This The book is adapted for the final season of ''Series/{{Poirot}}'', [[InNameOnly with a vastly differing plot]], due to the screenwriter finding the novel contains to be an "unadaptable mess".

! Tropes found in
the following Tropes
novel:



* IHaveYourWife: The Big Four do this to Hastings, promising to release her if he manages to lure Poirot to them. [[spoiler: Luckily, Poirot already thought they'd try this and has had her hidden for months now]]

to:

* IHaveYourWife: The Big Four do this to Hastings, promising to release her if he manages to lure Poirot to them. [[spoiler: Luckily, Poirot already thought they'd try this and has had her hidden for months now]] now]].
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: The novel features around 30+ named characters, though most of them are mere plot devices who provides bits and pieces of clues and moves the plot along without having much involvement with the actual case.



* YellowPeril: Unfortunately, there's a bit of this. The mastermind of The Big Four is Chinese (although the other three are Caucasian), among other things.

to:

* YellowPeril: Unfortunately, there's a bit of this. The mastermind of The Big Four is Chinese (although the other three are Caucasian), among other things.things.

! Tropes found in the books:
* AdaptatedOut: Due to the massive changes of the storyline (which scales down the scope of the affair), the cast is considerably pared down. Among the deleted characters are Achille (the [[spoiler:fake twin brother of Hercule Poirot]]) and Countess Vera Rossakoff.
* AdaptationalHeroism: In the TV adaptation, 3 of the Big Four are actually innocent.
* AscendedExtra: In the books, [[spoiler:Flossie Monroe]] is only one of the many {{Flat Character}}s whose sole purpose is to provide a single clue to aid the investigation. In the adaptation, she [[spoiler:is the object of affection of Claud Darrell, whose unrequited love for her]] is the reason why the Big Four was even founded.
* CanonForeigner: Lawrence Tysoe the journalist does not exist in the original material.
* DeathFromAbove: During the final confrontation, [[spoiler:Claude Darrell tries to shoot at Poirot]], at which point [[spoiler:Tysoe]] drops a curtain on the former and killing him.
* FromNobodyToNightmare: [[spoiler:Number Four is just a common actor from a no-name company]], with neither wealth, fame or position of power. His role as the Big Four's mastermind turns him to a global threat.
* InNameOnly: The TV episode is a very loose adaptation of the novel, and the villain's motives and actions are completely different from the books.
* InterpidReporter: Tysoe causes a lot of stir by publishing news about the Big Four's activities in spite of Poirot's warning that he be discreet.
* LoveMakesYouCrazy: [[spoiler:Claude Darrell falls in love with Flossie Monroe, who told him that he's not good or famous enough for her]]. He then forms the Big Four to win her affection.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: Flossie Monroe dies in the books. In the adaptation, she lives.


* FiveBadBand: The Big Four.
** BigBad: Number One/The Oriental [[spoiler: Li Chang Yen]]
** TheDragon: Number Four/The Destroyer [[spoiler: Claud Darrell]]
** EvilGenius: Number Three/The Frenchwoman [[spoiler: Madame Olivier]]
** TheBrute: Number Two/The American [[spoiler: Abe Ryland]]
** DarkChick: One could say that [[spoiler: Vera Rossakoff]] fills this role.
* GenreSavvy: Poirot, unsurprisingly, has a bit of this going for him, and successfully manages to outmaneuver them thanks to it.
** Even ''[[IdiotHero Hastings]]'' gets this one time, leaving clues for Poirot as to where he's going before going with an emissary of the Big Four.

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