Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Literature / PoeticEdda

Go To



[[quoteright:220:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poeticeddacover_9982.jpg]]

to:

[[quoteright:220:https://static.[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poeticeddacover_9982.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/arthurrackham_seabattle.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Thor fishes up the Midgard Serpent, as told in "Hymiskvida". Illustration by Arthur Rackham (1901)]]


* DeathGlare: In "Hymiskvida", Thor and Tyr go to the hall of the giant Hymir to borrow his cauldron. When they arrive, Hymir is not at home, and Hymir's mother asks them to hide behind a pillar, because Hymir does not like guests and might especially get angry if he sees Thor. When Hymir comes home, his mother gently instructs him who has come to visit him, and that Thor and Tyr are presently behind the pillar. Hymir turns to the pillar and glares at it so sharply that it splinters, and the cross-beam above it comes down. (Note that Hymir does not normally have a magical gaze.)

to:

* DeathGlare: In "Hymiskvida", Thor and Tyr go to the hall of the giant Hymir to borrow his cauldron. When they arrive, Hymir is not at home, and Hymir's mother asks them to hide behind a pillar, because Hymir does not like guests and might especially get angry if he sees Thor. When Hymir comes home, his mother gently instructs him who has come to visit him, and that Thor and Tyr are presently behind the pillar. Hymir turns to the pillar and glares at it so sharply that it splinters, and the cross-beam above it comes down. (Note that Hymir does not normally have a [[DeadlyGaze magical gaze.gaze]].)

Added DiffLines:

* DeathGlare: In "Hymiskvida", Thor and Tyr go to the hall of the giant Hymir to borrow his cauldron. When they arrive, Hymir is not at home, and Hymir's mother asks them to hide behind a pillar, because Hymir does not like guests and might especially get angry if he sees Thor. When Hymir comes home, his mother gently instructs him who has come to visit him, and that Thor and Tyr are presently behind the pillar. Hymir turns to the pillar and glares at it so sharply that it splinters, and the cross-beam above it comes down. (Note that Hymir does not normally have a magical gaze.)


* EveryOneHasStandards: When the Huns are told by Gudrun that she has killed her and Atli's sons and feed them to him, the Huns start to cry and scream in anguish.

Added DiffLines:

* EveryOneHasStandards: When the Huns are told by Gudrun that she has killed her and Atli's sons and feed them to him, the Huns start to cry and scream in anguish.


Added DiffLines:

* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: In ''Atlakviða'', belived to be one of the oldest of the poems, Gudrun feeds Atli the hearts of his own sons then personally kills Atli in his bed, and with the help of some bribed housecarls, sets fire to Atli's hall and eventually entire estate, murdering all of his followers in order to avenge the death of her brothers.


Added DiffLines:

** Atli is killed in bed.


* ShapeshiftingLover: Völundr and his two brothers encounter three valkyries spinning flax in the wild and take away their swan-shirts which the valkyries need to transform into birds. After living with the brothers for nine years, the valkyries retrieve their magic shirts and fly away.

to:

* ShapeshiftingLover: ShapeshiftingLover:
**
Völundr and his two brothers encounter three valkyries spinning flax in the wild and take away their swan-shirts which the valkyries need to transform into birds. After living with the brothers for nine years, the valkyries retrieve their magic shirts and fly away.


* UngratefulBastard: Dag prays to Odin to help him avange the death of his father. Odin lends him his spear and Dag waylays his father's kiler. When Dag's sister later calls him out on the killing, Dag calls her sister mad and complains that Odin causes all strifes with his runes. Never mind ''he'' asked for Odin's aid in the murder.

to:

* UngratefulBastard: Dag prays to Odin to help him avange avenge the death of his father. Odin lends him his spear spear, and Dag waylays his father's kiler.killer. When Dag's sister later calls him out on the killing, Dag calls her sister mad and complains that Odin causes all strifes with his runes. Never mind ''he'' asked for Odin's aid in the murder.


* JerkassGods: Loki takes quite a few levels of jerkass in ''Lokasenna'', especially his murder or Ægir's servant because he was [[EvilIsPetty jealous of the positive attention said servant recieved]].

to:

* JerkassGods: Loki takes quite a few levels of jerkass in ''Lokasenna'', especially his murder or Ægir's [=Ægir=]'s servant because he was [[EvilIsPetty jealous of the positive attention said servant recieved]].


One of the two works referred to as ''Literature/{{Edda}}s'', the ''Poetic Edda'' is actually not a single, fixed work, but a collective term for poetry on stories and themes from Myth/{{Norse mythology}} as found in old UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic manuscripts. The bulk of these poems, however, is contained in a single manuscript, the ''Codex Regius'', a work first compiled c. 1230 CE (though the only exemplar we have was created c. 1270 CE). The poems themself are thought to date from various points between the 10th and 13th century. The exact dating of individual poems has always been subject to debate.

Those lays that are considered part of the ''Poetic Edda'', but are not found in the ''Codex Regius'', are sometimes called the ''Eddica Minora'' ("lesser Eddic lays"). All the lays of the ''Poetic Edda'' are generally of anonymous authorship.

to:

One of the two works referred to as ''Literature/{{Edda}}s'', the ''Poetic Edda'' is actually not a single, fixed work, but a collective term for poetry on stories and themes from Myth/{{Norse mythology}} as found in old UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic manuscripts. The bulk of these poems, however, is contained in a single manuscript, the ''Codex Regius'', a work first compiled c. 1230 CE (though the only exemplar we have was created c. 1270 CE). The poems themself themselves are thought to date from various points between the 10th and 13th century. The exact dating of individual poems has always been subject to debate.

Those lays that are considered part of the ''Poetic Edda'', Edda'' but are not found in the ''Codex Regius'', are sometimes called the ''Eddica Minora'' ("lesser Eddic lays"). All the lays of the ''Poetic Edda'' are generally of anonymous authorship.


* CreationMyth: In "Völuspá".
* DisguisedInDrag: Thor dresses up as Freyja in "Thrymskvida" to get into Jotunheim (and his hands on the hammer {{Mjolnir}}).

to:

* CreationMyth: In "Völuspá".
"Völuspá" and "Grimnismal".
* DisguisedInDrag: Thor dresses up as Freyja in "Thrymskvida" to get into Jotunheim (and his hands on the hammer {{Mjolnir}}).{{Mjolnir}}), with Loki as his bridesmaid.


Added DiffLines:

* EvilGloating: Loki gloats about murdering Baldr in ''Lokasenna''.
* JerkassGods: Loki takes quite a few levels of jerkass in ''Lokasenna'', especially his murder or Ægir's servant because he was [[EvilIsPetty jealous of the positive attention said servant recieved]].


Added DiffLines:

** Loki is said to have taken the shape of a milk maid and carried children.


Added DiffLines:

* PlayingBothSides: Odin helps Dag murder Helgi, but clearly favours Helgi since he allows Helgi to humiliate Helgi's olde enemy Hunding once the two meets in Valhalla.


One of the two works referred to as ''Literature/{{Edda}}s'', the ''Poetic Edda'' is actually not a single, fixed work, but a collective term for poetry on stories and themes from Myth/{{Norse mythology}} as found in old UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic manuscripts. The bulk of these poems, however, is contained in a single manuscript, the ''Codex Regius'', a work first compiled c. 1230 CE (though the only exemplar we have was created c. 1270 CE).

to:

One of the two works referred to as ''Literature/{{Edda}}s'', the ''Poetic Edda'' is actually not a single, fixed work, but a collective term for poetry on stories and themes from Myth/{{Norse mythology}} as found in old UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic manuscripts. The bulk of these poems, however, is contained in a single manuscript, the ''Codex Regius'', a work first compiled c. 1230 CE (though the only exemplar we have was created c. 1270 CE). \n The poems themself are thought to date from various points between the 10th and 13th century. The exact dating of individual poems has always been subject to debate.




to:

* UngratefulBastard: Dag prays to Odin to help him avange the death of his father. Odin lends him his spear and Dag waylays his father's kiler. When Dag's sister later calls him out on the killing, Dag calls her sister mad and complains that Odin causes all strifes with his runes. Never mind ''he'' asked for Odin's aid in the murder.


* DisguisedInDrag: Thor dresses up as Freyja in "Thrymskvida" to get into Jotunheim (and his hands on the hammer Mjolnir).

to:

* DisguisedInDrag: Thor dresses up as Freyja in "Thrymskvida" to get into Jotunheim (and his hands on the hammer Mjolnir).{{Mjolnir}}).


* TheWeirdSisters: According to "Voluspa", the sacred Well of Urd is guarded by three Norns (goddesses of fate) by the names of Urd ("fate"), Verdandi ("happening") and Skuld ("destiny"). The guardians of the Well of Urd are consistently referred to as "maidens".

to:

* TheWeirdSisters: TheWeirdSisters:
**
According to "Voluspa", the sacred Well of Urd is guarded by three Norns (goddesses of fate) by the names of Urd ("fate"), Verdandi ("happening") and Skuld ("destiny"). The guardians of the Well of Urd are consistently referred to as "maidens".
** {{Valkyries}}, the supernatural women who determine who is going to die in a battle, frequently come in threes or multiples of three: There is a list of six valkyries in "Voluspa" and a list of twelve in "Grimnismal". The young Helgi Hjorvardsson sees nine valkyries riding by, and the giantess Hrimgred mentions she has seen Helgi being followed by twenty-seven valkyries who protect him.
** Volund and his two brothers encounter three valkyries spinning flax on the shore of a lake, and by taking their swan garments prevent them from turning into birds and flying away.



to:

* TheWeirdSisters: According to "Voluspa", the sacred Well of Urd is guarded by three Norns (goddesses of fate) by the names of Urd ("fate"), Verdandi ("happening") and Skuld ("destiny"). The guardians of the Well of Urd are consistently referred to as "maidens".



----

to:

----


* NuttySquirrel: The squirrel Ratatösk ("Drill-Tooth") is constantly running up and down the tree Yggdrasil, transmitting messages between the eagle at the top and the dragon Nidhoggr at its roots ("Grímnismál")

Showing 15 edit(s) of 51

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report