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%%* GirlishPigtails: Duh!

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%%* * GirlishPigtails: Duh!Part of Pippi's signature look involves two braided pigtails sticking out on sides of her head.


* BlatantLies: Pippi is not the most truthful of people, though most of her lies are generally just to amuse herself and her friends. Occasionally people catch on to the fact that she tends to tell stories and [[CassandraTruth refuse to believe her when she's telling the truth]]. Usually this will result in pain and humiliation for them, while Pippi just shrugs and informs them that she doesn't ''always'' lie.



** Possibly the strongest hint here is in the book ''Pippi in the South Seas'', which is one of the times we actually see Pippi seriously crying -- Tommy is almost eaten by a shark, but Pippi saves him, after which the narrative notes she behaves "very strangely", hugging Tommy tightly and then breaking down in tears. When the other children, a little startled by this uncharacteristic behavior, ask if she's crying because Tommy almost died, she answers rather crossly that she's crying because that poor shark didn't get any breakfast.

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** Possibly the strongest hint here is in the book ''Pippi in the South Seas'', which is one of the times we actually see Pippi seriously crying -- Tommy is almost eaten by a shark, but Pippi saves him, after which the narrative notes she behaves "very strangely", hugging Tommy tightly and then breaking down in tears. When the other children, a little startled by this uncharacteristic behavior, ask if she's crying because Tommy almost died, she answers rather crossly that [[BlatantLies she's crying because that poor shark didn't get any breakfast.breakfast]].


''Pippi Longstocking'' began as a series of children's books by [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} Swedish]] author Creator/AstridLindgren. They have since been adapted into multiple films and television series. The series is regarded as a classic of Swedish literature and the character has become a cultural icon.

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''Pippi Longstocking'' (or Pippi Långstrump) began as a series of children's books by [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} Swedish]] author Creator/AstridLindgren. They have since been adapted into multiple films and television series. The series is regarded as a classic of Swedish literature and the character has become a cultural icon.

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* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: In the 1988 film, Pippi is sent to a [[OrphanageOfFear dreary orphanage]] after one of her escapades results in her, Tommy and Annika nearly drowning, and living there [[BreakTheCutie breaks her spirit]] until she meets an eccentric man who restores her optimism.


* HairTriggerAvalanche: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Enters the Big Race", Pippi enters a ski race as a representative of her village and despite some blatant delays from the {{Jerkass}}, [[StrawMisogynist misogynistic]] registrar, she quickly catches up to second place, but [[TheBully Bengt]] the bully- [[GreenEyedMonster who is envious of Pippi being the representative]] ([[DrivenByEnvy and also helped the registrar delay Pippi]])- isn't happy and gets the idea to cause an avalanche, hoping that Pippi would get buried by it. After finding an ideal spot to cause an avalanche and sarcastically commenting that causing an avalanche would be a shame, Bengt lets the lead skier go through and when Pippi comes by, he blows into a trumpet, only for the sound come out muffled, Bengt sees that Pippi is almost through and tries again, but with the same result. As Pippi makes it across, Bengt looks inside the trumpet, sees that it's been clogged with a banana (one that Mr. Nilsson had), and [[TheScream screams]], triggering the avalanche he wanted, [[GoneHorriblyRight only that the avalanche]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard threatens to bury ''him'' and not Pippi]].

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* HairTriggerAvalanche: HairTriggerAvalanche:
**
In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Enters the Big Race", Pippi enters a ski race as a representative of her village and despite some blatant delays from the {{Jerkass}}, [[StrawMisogynist misogynistic]] registrar, she quickly catches up to second place, but [[TheBully Bengt]] the bully- [[GreenEyedMonster who is envious of Pippi being the representative]] ([[DrivenByEnvy and also helped the registrar delay Pippi]])- isn't happy and gets the idea to cause an avalanche, hoping that Pippi would get buried by it. After finding an ideal spot to cause an avalanche and sarcastically commenting that causing an avalanche would be a shame, Bengt lets the lead skier go through and when Pippi comes by, he blows into a trumpet, only for the sound come out muffled, Bengt sees that Pippi is almost through and tries again, but with the same result. As Pippi makes it across, Bengt looks inside the trumpet, sees that it's been clogged with a banana (one that one of Mr. Nilsson had), Nilsson's bananas, and [[TheScream screams]], triggering the avalanche he wanted, [[GoneHorriblyRight only that the avalanche]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard threatens to bury ''him'' and not Pippi]].



* NowWhichOneWasThatVoice: The end credits on the 1998 series only feature a list of the main voice actors. Any supporting and minor roles remain unknown.



* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and her fellow ''Series/{{SCTV}}'' member Dave Thomas has his duties taken over by Len Carlson. Additionally, the schoolteacher has a different (unidentified) voice actress than the film featuring singer Carole Pope.


** Mrs. Prysselius in the 1997 animated film and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, slightly annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic and borders on being a ControlFreak; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told'', and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.
** Likewise, Tommy and Annika's father in the 1988 film takes on a more antagonistic role. In all other incarnations he's a fairly minor character who seldom appears but doesn't seem to have any problems with Pippi. In the 1988 film, played by Creator/DennisDugan, he's a parody of the StandardFiftiesFather who is a NervousWreck and disapproves of Pippi's free spirit and lets himself be tricked by the villains into taking an active role in getting her into the local orphanage as soon as possible.

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** Mrs. Prysselius in the 1997 animated film and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, slightly annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic and borders on being a ControlFreak; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told'', and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.
** Likewise, Tommy and Annika's father in the 1988 film takes on a more antagonistic role. In all other incarnations he's a fairly minor character who seldom appears but doesn't seem to have any problems with Pippi. In the 1988 film, ''New Adventures'', played by Creator/DennisDugan, he's a parody of the StandardFiftiesFather who is a NervousWreck and [[TheFinickyOne disapproves of Pippi's free spirit spirit]] and lets himself be tricked by the villains into taking an active role in getting her into the local orphanage as soon as possible.


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* AllOfTheOtherReindeer: In ''New Adventures'', Tommy and Annika's reaction to Pippi playing the orphanage children is that [[TheFinickyOne their father]] would disapprove.

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* OutOfGenreExperience: Most of the 1998 series is adventure/comedy but "Pippi Meets the White Lady" comes off as something of an OutOfHolidayEpisode, being aired in September.

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* ChildrenVoicingChildren: Pippi, Tommy and Annika are voiced by young actors, the oldest of the three possibly being Melissa Altro (Pippi).


** Likewise, Tommy and Annika's father in the 1988 film takes on a more antagonistic role. In all other incarnations he's a fairly minor character who seldom appears but doesn't seem to have any problems with Pippi. In the 1988 film he's a parody of the StandardFiftiesFather who is a NervousWreck and disapproves of Pippi's free spirit and lets himself be tricked by the movie's villains into taking an active role in getting her into the local orphanage as soon as possible.

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** Likewise, Tommy and Annika's father in the 1988 film takes on a more antagonistic role. In all other incarnations he's a fairly minor character who seldom appears but doesn't seem to have any problems with Pippi. In the 1988 film film, played by Creator/DennisDugan, he's a parody of the StandardFiftiesFather who is a NervousWreck and disapproves of Pippi's free spirit and lets himself be tricked by the movie's villains into taking an active role in getting her into the local orphanage as soon as possible.



* AnimatedAdaptation: The only studio to attempt it so far is Creator/{{Nelvana}}, the same studio that produced WesternAnimation/{{Care Bears|1980s}}. It started in 1997 as a film musical, then spun off into a 26-episode TV series that aired throughout the following year.

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* AnimatedAdaptation: The only studio to attempt it so far is Creator/{{Nelvana}}, the same studio that produced producers of WesternAnimation/{{Care Bears|1980s}}. It started in 1997 as a film musical, then spun off into a 26-episode TV series that aired throughout the following year.



* AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated film and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's (or Bloom and Thunder-Karlsson in the 90s iterations) IWantSong 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' from the film in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Thunder-Karlsson (in his and Bloom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from TheEighties. As imagined by a fairly dim-witted criminal most likely having spent his entire life living in a quaint 1940s-style village.

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* AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated film and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's (or Bloom and Thunder-Karlsson in the 90s iterations) IWantSong 'A "A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' Tooth" from the 1997 film in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Thunder-Karlsson (in his and Bloom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from TheEighties. As imagined by a fairly dim-witted criminal most likely having spent his entire life living in a quaint 1940s-style village.



* AscendedExtra: The two burglars, Blom and Dunder-Karlsson, only appear in one chapter in the original books, but go on to become major recurring characters in the 1969 TV series and later adaptations. Likewise, Kling and Klang, the two police officers were nameless minor characters in the books and got names and larger roles in the TV series. Same with Willie, Bengt and his lackeys who all only appeared in one chapter in the book series, now make at least two appearances in the 1998 animated series.

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* AscendedExtra: The two burglars, Blom and Dunder-Karlsson, only appear in one chapter in the original books, but go on to become major recurring characters in the 1969 TV series and later adaptations. Likewise, Kling and Klang, the two police officers were nameless minor characters in the books and got names and larger roles in the TV series. Same with Willie, Bengt and his lackeys who all only appeared in one chapter in the book series, now make at least two three appearances in the 1998 animated series.series.
* BadPeopleAbuseAnimals: The owner in the 1998 series episode "Pippi Trains Some Animals - and Their Owner" regularly mistreats his animals, and is about to whip his horse when [[BerserkButton Pippi intervenes]]. He learns his lesson by episode's end.



* DisappearedDad: Ephraim Longstocking, who was blown overboard in a storm. [[spoiler:He managed to swim ashore and was rescued by friendly natives. His character is based on historical ship's master Carl Petersson]].

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* DependingOnTheWriter: In the 1998 series, Mrs. Prysselius jumps from ControlFreak to occasional [[HeelFaceTurn nicer attributes]] but this depends on the episode.
* DisappearedDad: Ephraim Longstocking, who was blown overboard in a storm. [[spoiler:He managed to swim ashore and was rescued by friendly natives. His character is based on historical ship's master Carl Petersson]].Petersson.]]



* NowWhichOneWasThatVoice: The end credits on the 1998 series only feature a list of the main voice actors. Any supporting and minor roles remain unknown.



** The film adaptation of ''Pippi on the South Seas'' follows Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue her father.

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** The film adaptation of ''Pippi on the South Seas'' film adaptation follows Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue her father.



* RuleAbidingRebel: You'd think a child with [[BewareTheSuperman superhuman strength and a complete disregard for rules]] would be indiscriminately violent or even murderous, but she only gets into relatively innocent mischief. She was more rebellious in the original version of the book, which was published after Astrid Lindgren's death. It was given the title ''Ur-Pippi''.

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* RuleAbidingRebel: You'd think a child with [[BewareTheSuperman superhuman strength and a complete disregard for rules]] would be indiscriminately violent or even murderous, but she only gets into relatively innocent mischief. She was more rebellious in the original version of the book, which was published after Astrid Lindgren's death. It was given the title ''Ur-Pippi''.



* SeinfeldianConversation: Despite certain Series/{{Seinfeld}} characters having no idea who she is and think she's got something to do with Hitler, she actually provided examples of this trope long before any of them were ever on TV.
* SingleMindedTwins: While they're not actually twins, Tommy and Annika often display hints of this in the books, having similar if not identical reactions to things and often sharing spoken lines -- though not played completely straight, as there are occasional hints of differences between them, Tommy being more upbeat and easygoing, while Annika is more pessimistic and anxious. The 1969 TV series and films [[CharacterExaggeration take these individual traits and makes them clearer]], completely averting the trope.

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* SeinfeldianConversation: Despite certain Series/{{Seinfeld}} characters having no idea who she is and think she's got something to do with Hitler, UsefulNotes/{{Adolf Hitler}}, she actually provided examples of this trope long before any of them were ever on TV.
* SingleMindedTwins: While they're not actually twins, Tommy and Annika often display hints of this in the books, having similar if not identical reactions to things and often sharing spoken lines -- though not played completely straight, as there are occasional hints of differences between them, Tommy being more upbeat and easygoing, while Annika is more pessimistic and anxious. The 1969 TV series and films [[CharacterExaggeration take these individual traits and makes them clearer]], completely averting the trope. trope.
* SlasherSmile: Playing FreezeFrameBonus with the 1998 series usually results in a terrifying look on Pippi's face.

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* VocalDissonance: Anyone who grew up with the 1997 animated film but not the subsequent animated series will find Thunder-Karlsson and the schoolteacher radically different. The replacement for Mrs. Prysselius is actually remarkably similar to Creator/CatherineOHara.


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* WouldHurtAChild: Most of the major villains see no issue with putting Pippi and her friends in life-threatening situations.

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* WouldHitAGirl: Bengt and his gang.


* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and her fellow Series/SCTV member Dave Thomas has his duties taken over by Len Carlson. The schoolteacher has a different (unidentified) voice actress than the film featuring singer Carole Pope.

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* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and her fellow Series/SCTV ''Series/{{SCTV}}'' member Dave Thomas has his duties taken over by Len Carlson. The Additionally, the schoolteacher has a different (unidentified) voice actress than the film featuring singer Carole Pope.


** Mrs. Prysselius in the 1997 animated film and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, slightly annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told'', and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.

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** Mrs. Prysselius in the 1997 animated film and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, slightly annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic; antagonistic and borders on being a ControlFreak; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told'', and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.



** Subverted for Bengt the bully in the 1997 TV series, Bengt is still a bully in the animated TV series, but he might be a bigger bully than his past incarnations.
*** Past incarnations of Bengt were usually just limited to annoying, making fun of, and bothering potential bully victims, but Bengt in the 1997 TV series is not above being a sore loser and planning a sabotage against Pippi during a ski race (teaming up with the {{Jerkass}}, [[StrawMisogynist misogynistic]] registrar- who thinks little girls can't ski and refuses to register Pippi into the race - to delay Pippi and when that fails, he resorts to attempting to bury Pippi in an avalanche).

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** Subverted for Bengt the bully in the 1997 TV series, Bengt is still a bully in the animated TV series, but he might be a bigger bully menace than his past incarnations.
*** Past incarnations of Bengt were usually just limited to annoying, making fun of, and bothering potential bully victims, but Bengt in the 1997 TV series is not above being a sore loser and planning a sabotage against Pippi during a ski race (teaming up with the {{Jerkass}}, [[StrawMisogynist misogynistic]] registrar- who thinks little girls can't ski and refuses to register Pippi into the race - to delay Pippi and when that fails, he resorts to attempting to bury Pippi in an avalanche).



* AlwaysABiggerFish: Subverted. Pippi has inherited her SuperStrength from her father, so you'd expect him to be the only one stronger than her... but no, she's actually (somewhat) stronger than even ''him.''

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* AlwaysABiggerFish: Subverted. Pippi has inherited her SuperStrength from her father, so you'd expect him to be the only one stronger than her... but no, she's actually (somewhat) stronger than even ''him.''''him''.



* AnimatedAdaptation: The only studio to attempt it so far is Creator/{{Nelvana}}, the same studio that produced WesternAnimation/{{Care Bears|1980s}}. It started in 1997 as a movie musical, then spun off into a 26 episode TV series.
* AnimationBump: While the 1997 animated film has generally decent animation, the animation quality suddenly takes an upturn during the song "A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth", utilizing more fluent motion, ambitious cinematography and unusual lighting techniques than the rest of the film's animation.

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* AnimatedAdaptation: The only studio to attempt it so far is Creator/{{Nelvana}}, the same studio that produced WesternAnimation/{{Care Bears|1980s}}. It started in 1997 as a movie film musical, then spun off into a 26 episode 26-episode TV series.
series that aired throughout the following year.
* AnimationBump: While the 1997 animated film has generally decent animation, the animation quality suddenly takes an upturn during the song "A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth", utilizing more fluent motion, ambitious cinematography and unusual lighting techniques than the rest of the film's animation.film.



* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Christmas special of the animated series, where Thunder-Karlsson and Bloom ''want'' to go to prison, simply because it's the closest thing they have to a home. Sadly, they can't get in trouble because of too much Christmas spirit, even when they commit what they feel must be the ultimate crime-- stealing candy from a baby.
* CharacterExaggeration: One of the [[TropesAreNotBad good examples]] with Tommy and Annika in the 1969 TV series and its related films -- in the books, while they do have some individual traits, they're mostly played up as contrasts to Pippi. In the series and films (particularly the last, ''Pippi on the Run'') their individual traits come across much more strongly: Tommy as the cheerful, easygoing older brother, Annika as the emotional, sensible younger sister.

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* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Christmas special of the animated series, where Thunder-Karlsson and Bloom ''want'' to go to prison, simply because it's the closest thing they have to a home. Sadly, they can't get in trouble because of too much Christmas spirit, even when they commit what they feel must be the ultimate crime-- crime: stealing candy from a baby.
* CharacterExaggeration: One of the [[TropesAreNotBad good examples]] with Tommy and Annika in the 1969 TV series and its related films -- in the books, while they do have some individual traits, they're mostly played up as contrasts to Pippi. In the series and films (particularly the last, ''Pippi on the Run'') Run''), their individual traits come across much more strongly: Tommy as the cheerful, easygoing older brother, Annika as the emotional, sensible younger sister.



* ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve: [[spoiler:Pippi flies on a broom at the end of ''Pippi on the Run.'']]

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* ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve: [[spoiler:Pippi flies on a broom at the end of ''Pippi on the Run.'']] Run''.]]



* TheCloudcuckoolanderWasRight: Pippi about her father. She told children seemingly fantastic stories about him being a seafarer who survived a ship wreck and became a king of the natives on a South Sea island. Everything was true.

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* TheCloudcuckoolanderWasRight: Pippi about her father. She told tells children seemingly fantastic stories about him being a seafarer who survived a ship wreck and became a king of the natives on a South Sea island. Everything was All of it is true.



* CuteBruiser: Pippi has not only defeated bullies, police officers, robbers, and dangerous animals, but in one of the movies she took down an entire gang of fully armed pirates!

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* CuteBruiser: Pippi has not only defeated bullies, police officers, robbers, robbers and dangerous animals, but in one of the movies films, she took down an entire gang of fully armed pirates!



* ExtremeOmnivore: Pippi once, on a whim, drank a cocktail of "meduseen (sic)" from the local pharmacy, including several bottles marked "For External Use Only". She seemed to be just fine in the next chapter. And don't forget her literal nail soup (a swedish expression similar to StoneSoup).
* FailedASpotCheck: The pirates in the ''Pippi in the South Seas'' film keep failing to notice Pippi, Annika and Tommy several times when they are fairly close by, almost to the point of being a RunningGag.
* FashionableAsymmetry: Pippi's long stocking never match.

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* ExtremeOmnivore: Pippi once, on a whim, drank a cocktail of "meduseen (sic)" from the local pharmacy, including several bottles marked "For External Use Only". She seemed to be just fine in the next chapter. And don't forget her literal nail soup (a swedish Swedish expression similar to StoneSoup).
* FailedASpotCheck: The pirates in the film adaptation of ''Pippi in the South Seas'' film keep failing to notice Pippi, Annika and Tommy several times when they are fairly close by, almost to the point of being a RunningGag.
* FashionableAsymmetry: Pippi's long stocking stockings never match.



* FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator: Tommy and Annika in the 1969 TV series are often heard as voice-over narrators when exposition needs to be delivered. On very rare occasions, they'd even [[BreakingTheFourthWall directly address the camera to explain something]] -- like in the first episode, when Tommy and Annika introduce themselves and their family to the viewer through their regular voice-over narration, and then as they leave their house to run for school, Annika stops in front of the camera and tells the audience: [[CaptainObvious "This is our house!"]]

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* FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator: Tommy and Annika in the 1969 TV series are often heard as voice-over narrators when exposition needs to be delivered. On very rare occasions, they'd even [[BreakingTheFourthWall directly address the camera to explain something]] -- like in the first episode, when Tommy and Annika introduce themselves and their family to the viewer through their regular voice-over narration, and then as they leave their house to run for school, Annika stops in front of the camera and tells the audience: [[CaptainObvious "This is our house!"]]



* TheGadfly: Occasionally she'll annoy random people for seemingly no other reason than that it's funny. For the most part, tough, her worst insults and most annoying behavior are directed towards overly-strict or pompous authority figures, bullies and villains.

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* TheGadfly: Occasionally Occasionally, she'll annoy random people for seemingly no other reason than that it's funny. For the most part, tough, though, her worst insults and most annoying behavior are directed towards overly-strict or pompous authority figures, bullies and villains.



* HairTriggerAvalanche: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Enters the Big Race," Pippi enters a ski race as a representative of her village and despite some blatant delays from the {{Jerkass}}, [[StrawMisogynist misogynistic]] registrar, she quickly catches up to second place, but [[TheBully Bengt]] the bully- [[GreenEyedMonster who is envious of Pippi being the representative]] ([[DrivenByEnvy and also helped the registrar delay Pippi]])- isn't happy and gets the idea to cause an avalanche, hoping that Pippi would get buried by it. After finding an ideal spot to cause an avalanche and sarcastically commenting that causing an avalanche would be a shame, Bengt lets the lead skier go through and when Pippi comes by, he blows into a trumpet, only for the sound come out muffled, Bengt sees that Pippi is almost through and tries again, but with the same result. As Pippi makes it across, Bengt looks inside the trumpet, sees that it's been clogged with a banana (a one that Mr. Nilsson had), and [[TheScream screams]], triggering the avalanche he wanted, [[GoneHorriblyRight only that the avalanche]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard threatens to bury ''him'' and not Pippi]].

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* HairTriggerAvalanche: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Enters the Big Race," Race", Pippi enters a ski race as a representative of her village and despite some blatant delays from the {{Jerkass}}, [[StrawMisogynist misogynistic]] registrar, she quickly catches up to second place, but [[TheBully Bengt]] the bully- [[GreenEyedMonster who is envious of Pippi being the representative]] ([[DrivenByEnvy and also helped the registrar delay Pippi]])- isn't happy and gets the idea to cause an avalanche, hoping that Pippi would get buried by it. After finding an ideal spot to cause an avalanche and sarcastically commenting that causing an avalanche would be a shame, Bengt lets the lead skier go through and when Pippi comes by, he blows into a trumpet, only for the sound come out muffled, Bengt sees that Pippi is almost through and tries again, but with the same result. As Pippi makes it across, Bengt looks inside the trumpet, sees that it's been clogged with a banana (a one (one that Mr. Nilsson had), and [[TheScream screams]], triggering the avalanche he wanted, [[GoneHorriblyRight only that the avalanche]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard threatens to bury ''him'' and not Pippi]].



* IAteWhat: In the 1997 TV series episode "Pippi Goes to School - Or Does She?", Bengt the bully snatches Willie's backpack and empties its contents. Among which is a piece of blubber that Willie brought to show the class, he tricks Bengt into stealing it, claiming it's a special Northern treat for the class. Later, when Bengt eats the blubber, it tastes awful and apparently upsets his stomach.

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* IAteWhat: In the 1997 TV series episode "Pippi Goes to School - Or Does She?", Bengt the bully snatches Willie's backpack and empties its contents. Among which is a piece of blubber that Willie brought to show the class, he tricks Bengt into stealing it, claiming it's a special Northern treat for the class. Later, when Bengt eats the blubber, it tastes awful and apparently upsets his stomach.



* ImagineSpot: The 1998 animated TV series is full of them, largely due to Pippi's tall tales.



* MotorMouth: Pippi routinely lapses into longwinded, nonsensical speech, especially when she's telling lies or dealing with a stuffy adult.

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* MotorMouth: Pippi routinely lapses into longwinded, nonsensical speech, especially when she's telling lies tall tales or dealing with a stuffy adult.



* TheNewAdventures: Used by the 1988 movie ''The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking''. Subverted, since its actually a new adaptation of the story rather then her actual "New Adventures".
* NoNameGiven: In the books, Pippi's horse is simply called '[[ADogNamedDog the horse]]', though certain film and video adaptations have named him either "Old Man", "Lilla Gubben" (affectionate Swedish for "Little old man") or "Alfonzo."

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* TheNewAdventures: Used by the 1988 movie film ''The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking''. Subverted, since its actually a new adaptation of the story rather then her actual "New Adventures".
* NoNameGiven: In the books, Pippi's horse is simply called '[[ADogNamedDog the horse]]', though certain film and video adaptations have named him either "Old Man", "Lilla Gubben" (affectionate Swedish for "Little old man") or "Alfonzo.""Alfonzo".



* NonIndicativeName: The aforementioned "New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking" from 1988.
* ObviouslyEvil: In the animated film, Mrs. Prysselius is the BigBad who wants to send Pippi Longstocking off to a children's home. The lengths she goes to just to have Pippi put in the children's home are undoubtedly questionable. The only reason she relents at the end is because now that Pippi's father returned, that just took away her only justification for her goal, and had no choice but to fake a HeelFaceTurn.

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* NonIndicativeName: The aforementioned 1988 film "New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking" from 1988.
Longstocking".
* ObviouslyEvil: In the 1997 animated film, Mrs. Prysselius is the BigBad who wants to send Pippi Longstocking off to a children's home. The lengths she goes to just to have Pippi put in the children's home are undoubtedly questionable. The only reason she relents at the end is because now that Pippi's father returned, that just took away her only justification for her goal, and had no choice but to fake a HeelFaceTurn.



** Tami Erin had her only major film starring role in this film. Erin would later go on to appear in minor roles for television series as well as independent films while maintaining a steady career as a fashion designer and model.
** This was also Cory Crow's only foray into acting as Annika, as she hasn't been involved in acting since this film.
* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and [[Series/SCTV Dave Thomas]] has his duties taken over by Len Carlson.

to:

** Tami Erin had her only major film starring role in this film. Erin would later go on to appear in minor roles for television series as well as independent films while maintaining a steady career as a fashion designer and model.
** This was also Cory Crow's only foray into acting as Annika, as she hasn't been involved in acting since this film.
since.
* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and [[Series/SCTV her fellow Series/SCTV member Dave Thomas]] Thomas has his duties taken over by Len Carlson.Carlson. The schoolteacher has a different (unidentified) voice actress than the film featuring singer Carole Pope.



** She even states at one point that she wants to be a pirate when she grows up. Somewhat justified by the fact that her father was a wealthy sea captain in the books, but whether he's really a pirate is unclear.

to:

** She even states at one point that she wants to be a pirate when she grows up. Somewhat justified by the fact that her father was is a wealthy sea captain in the books, but whether he's really ''really'' a pirate is unclear.



** The third 1969-era film adaptation follows Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue Pippi's father.

to:

** The third 1969-era film adaptation of ''Pippi on the South Seas'' follows Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue Pippi's her father.



** Possibly the strongest hint here is in the book ''Pippi in the South Seas,'' which is one of the times we actually see Pippi seriously crying -- Tommy is almost eaten by a shark, but Pippi saves him, after which the narrative notes she behaves "very strangely", hugging Tommy tightly and then breaking down in tears. When the other children, a little startled by this uncharacteristic behavior, ask if she's crying because Tommy almost died, she answers rather crossly that she's crying because that poor shark didn't get any breakfast.

to:

** Possibly the strongest hint here is in the book ''Pippi in the South Seas,'' Seas'', which is one of the times we actually see Pippi seriously crying -- Tommy is almost eaten by a shark, but Pippi saves him, after which the narrative notes she behaves "very strangely", hugging Tommy tightly and then breaking down in tears. When the other children, a little startled by this uncharacteristic behavior, ask if she's crying because Tommy almost died, she answers rather crossly that she's crying because that poor shark didn't get any breakfast.



** The "fine" gentleman from the first chapter of the third book and the third episode of the 1997 TV series, who believes women don't understand business and can easily con a house from one.
** Additionally, the registrar from the eighth episode of the 1997 TV series, as for him, the mere thought of a little girl entering, let alone ''winning'' a ski race, is disgraceful.

to:

** The "fine" gentleman from the first chapter of the third book and the third 1997 TV series episode of the 1997 TV series, "Pippi Doesn't Sell Her House", who believes women don't understand business and can easily con a house from one.
** Additionally, the registrar from "Pippi Enters the eighth episode of the 1997 Big Race" (1997 TV series, series); as for him, the mere thought of a little girl entering, let alone ''winning'' a ski race, is disgraceful.



* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, the two policemen, from the 90s iterations, who obliviously oblige to give Bloom and Thunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet).
* UnclePennybags: Pippi is very generous with her gold pieces and never seems to run out of them.
* UnfortunateNames: In many languages, Pippi is a childish way to say piss, which is why her name is changed to Fifi in the French adaptation, Peppi in Russia and Finland, Bilbi in Israel, etc.

to:

* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, the two policemen, from the 90s iterations, who obliviously oblige to give Bloom Blom and Thunder-Karlsson Dunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet).
* UnclePennybags: Pippi is very generous with her gold pieces and never seems to run out of them.
out.
* UnfortunateNames: In many languages, Pippi is a childish way to say piss, "piss", which is why her name is changed to Fifi in the French adaptation, Peppi in Russia and Finland, Bilbi in Israel, etc.


* AnimationBump: While the 1997 animated movie has generally decent animation, the animation quality suddenly takes an upturn during the song "A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth", utilizing more fluent motion, ambitious cinematography and unusual lighting techniques than the rest of the film's animation.
* AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated movie and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' from the movie in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Dunder-Karlsson (in his and Blom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from TheEighties. As imagined by a fairly dim-witted criminal most likely having spent his entire life living in a quaint 1940s-style village.

to:

* AnimationBump: While the 1997 animated movie film has generally decent animation, the animation quality suddenly takes an upturn during the song "A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth", utilizing more fluent motion, ambitious cinematography and unusual lighting techniques than the rest of the film's animation.
* AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated movie film and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's (or Bloom and Thunder-Karlsson in the 90s iterations) IWantSong 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' from the movie film in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Dunder-Karlsson Thunder-Karlsson (in his and Blom's Bloom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from TheEighties. As imagined by a fairly dim-witted criminal most likely having spent his entire life living in a quaint 1940s-style village.



* AscendedExtra: The two burglars, Blom and Dunder-Karlsson, only appear in one chapter in the original books, but go on to become major recurring characters in the 1969 TV series and later adaptations. Likewise, Kling and Klang, the two police officers were nameless minor characters in the books and got names and larger roles in the TV series. Same with Willie, Bengt, and his lackeys who all only appeared in one chapter in the book series, now make at least two appearances in the 1999 animated TV series.
* BerserkButton: Pippi doesn't like it [[BewareTheNiceOnes when people beat their animals or bully those that are smaller and weaker]]. She can also get very upset if Tommy or Annika are in serious danger.

to:

* AscendedExtra: The two burglars, Blom and Dunder-Karlsson, only appear in one chapter in the original books, but go on to become major recurring characters in the 1969 TV series and later adaptations. Likewise, Kling and Klang, the two police officers were nameless minor characters in the books and got names and larger roles in the TV series. Same with Willie, Bengt, Bengt and his lackeys who all only appeared in one chapter in the book series, now make at least two appearances in the 1999 1998 animated TV series.
* BerserkButton: Pippi doesn't like it [[BewareTheNiceOnes when people beat abuse their animals or bully those that are smaller and weaker]]. She can also get very upset if Tommy or Annika are in serious danger.



** And as a double whammy, Bengt commented earlier that [[TemptingFate not even Pippi could ski through an avalanche]], but a later episode, "Pippi Finds a Mysterious Footprint," would show that Pippi ''can'' in fact ski through an avalanche, even briefly riding on top of it as if she was surfing on a wave.

to:

** And as a double whammy, Bengt commented earlier that [[TemptingFate not even Pippi could ski through an avalanche]], but a later episode, "Pippi Finds a Mysterious Footprint," Footprint", would show that Pippi ''can'' in fact ski through an avalanche, even briefly riding on top of it as if she was surfing on a wave.



* IAteWhat: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Goes to School - Or Does She?" Bengt the bully snatches Willie's backpack and empties its contents. Among which is a piece of blubber that Willie brought to show the class, he tricks Bengt into stealing it, claiming it's a special Northern treat for the class. Later, when Bengt eats the blubber, it tastes awful and apparently upsets his stomach.
* IdiotHoudini: The incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of the 1997 TV series never gets the idea that he's carelessly destroying personal belongings and property (doesn't help that no one seems to be willing to break the news to him).
** Although considering the last place he's seen in is ''Mrs. Prysselius's'' place, doing what he does best, ([[SarcasmMode fixing things]]), he'll likely get brought down to reality in a rude and angry manner [[ExpositionCut offscreen]].

to:

* IAteWhat: In the 1997 TV series episode, episode "Pippi Goes to School - Or Does She?" She?", Bengt the bully snatches Willie's backpack and empties its contents. Among which is a piece of blubber that Willie brought to show the class, he tricks Bengt into stealing it, claiming it's a special Northern treat for the class. Later, when Bengt eats the blubber, it tastes awful and apparently upsets his stomach.
* IdiotHoudini: The incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of "Pippi and the 1997 Carpenter" (1997 TV series series) never gets the idea that he's carelessly destroying personal belongings and property (doesn't help that no one seems to be willing to break the news to him).
** Although considering the last place he's seen in is ''Mrs. Prysselius's'' place, doing what he does best, ([[SarcasmMode fixing things]]), he'll likely get brought down to [[RealityEnsues reality in a rude and angry manner manner]] [[ExpositionCut offscreen]].



* LiveActionAdaptation: These go back as far as 1949, but the most famous ones are the 1969 Swedish TV series and the 1988 American film. Then, early in January 2010, it was announced that [[http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Debra-Granik-Working-To-Bring-Pippi-Longstocking-Back-To-The-Movies-22556.html a new American film is being planned.]]

to:

* LiveActionAdaptation: These go back as far as 1949, but the most famous ones are the 1969 Swedish TV series and the 1988 American film. Then, early in January 2010, it was announced that [[http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Debra-Granik-Working-To-Bring-Pippi-Longstocking-Back-To-The-Movies-22556.html a new American film is being planned.]]planned]].



* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and Dave Thomas has his duties taken over by Len Carlson.

to:

* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and [[Series/SCTV Dave Thomas Thomas]] has his duties taken over by Len Carlson.



** And in the original Swedish version: Pippilotta Victualia Rullgardina Krusmynta Efraimsdotter Långstrump.

to:

** And in In the original Swedish version: Swedish: Pippilotta Victualia Rullgardina Krusmynta Efraimsdotter Långstrump.



* SingleMindedTwins: While they're not actually twins, Tommy and Annika often display hints of this in the books, having similar if not identical reactions to things and often sharing spoken lines -- though not played completely straight, as there are occasional hints of differences between them, Tommy being more upbeat and easygoing, while Annika is more pessimistic and anxious. The 1969 TV series and movies [[CharacterExaggeration take these individual traits and makes them clearer,]] completely averting the trope.

to:

* SingleMindedTwins: While they're not actually twins, Tommy and Annika often display hints of this in the books, having similar if not identical reactions to things and often sharing spoken lines -- though not played completely straight, as there are occasional hints of differences between them, Tommy being more upbeat and easygoing, while Annika is more pessimistic and anxious. The 1969 TV series and movies films [[CharacterExaggeration take these individual traits and makes them clearer,]] clearer]], completely averting the trope.



* SpeechImpairedAnimal: Mr. Nilsson and Alfonzo in the 1988 movie.
* StepfordSmiler: Well, sort of. While there's no doubt that on the whole, Pippi is genuinely happy, there are the occasional, usually very subtle hints that she isn't ''quite'' as carefree as she pretends to be, and that at least some of her wackiness is a coping mechanism. It's mostly visible on the few occasions when she gets visibly upset or sad about something, and then moments later brushes it off, usually with a smart-alec comment or doing something spontaneously bizarre.
** Possibly the strongest hint here is in the book ''Pippi in the South Seas,'' which is one of the times we actually see Pippi seriously crying -- Tommy is almost eaten by a shark, but Pippi saves him, after which the narrative notes she behaves "very strangely," hugging Tommy tightly and then breaking down in tears. When the other children, a little startled by this uncharacteristic behavior, ask if she's crying because Tommy almost died, she answers rather crossly that she's crying because that poor shark didn't get any breakfast.

to:

* SpeechImpairedAnimal: Mr. Nilsson and Alfonzo in the 1988 movie.adaptation.
* StepfordSmiler: Well, sort of. While there's no doubt that on the whole, Pippi is genuinely happy, there are the occasional, usually very subtle hints that she isn't ''quite'' as carefree as she pretends to be, and that at least some of her wackiness is a coping mechanism. It's mostly visible on the few occasions when she gets visibly upset or sad about something, and then moments later brushes it off, usually with a smart-alec snarky comment or doing something spontaneously bizarre.
** Possibly the strongest hint here is in the book ''Pippi in the South Seas,'' which is one of the times we actually see Pippi seriously crying -- Tommy is almost eaten by a shark, but Pippi saves him, after which the narrative notes she behaves "very strangely," strangely", hugging Tommy tightly and then breaking down in tears. When the other children, a little startled by this uncharacteristic behavior, ask if she's crying because Tommy almost died, she answers rather crossly that she's crying because that poor shark didn't get any breakfast.



** Additionally, the registrar from the eighth episode of the 1997 TV series, as for him, the mere thought of a little girl entering the race, let alone winning a ski race, is disgraceful.

to:

** Additionally, the registrar from the eighth episode of the 1997 TV series, as for him, the mere thought of a little girl entering the race, entering, let alone winning ''winning'' a ski race, is disgraceful.



** Jim and Buck, the bandits from the book version of ''Pippi in the South Seas'' are a slightly more malicious and threatening version of this, even willing to hurt or kill Pippi, though Pippi handles them with ease.

to:

** Jim and Buck, the bandits from the book version of ''Pippi in the South Seas'' book are a slightly more malicious and threatening version of this, even willing to hurt or kill Pippi, though Pippi handles them with ease.



* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, the two policemen, from the 1997 film, who obliviously oblige to give Bloom and Thunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet).

to:

* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, the two policemen, from the 1997 film, 90s iterations, who obliviously oblige to give Bloom and Thunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet).



* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," the town's arrogant chairman is still unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building (which was his failed replacement for the original old folk's home), it's only after his wife threatens him that he gives in.
* WhatDoesSheSeeInHim: The woman in a pink suit from the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Doesn't Sell Her House." She is the girlfriend to the episode's main antagonist, who is a blatant sexist, hates children, and treats her like a slave. However unlike him, she is nice and friendly with children, especially Pippi. It's a wonder why she hasn't dumped him already.

to:

* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," Home", the town's arrogant chairman is still unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building (which was his failed replacement for the original old folk's home), it's home). It's only after his wife threatens him that he gives in.
* WhatDoesSheSeeInHim: The woman in a pink suit from the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Doesn't Sell Her House." House". She is the girlfriend to the episode's main antagonist, who is a blatant sexist, hates children, children and treats her like a slave. However However, unlike him, she is nice and friendly with children, especially Pippi. It's a wonder why she hasn't dumped him already.



* YuppieCouple: The third episode of the 1998 animated series features an antagonist in the form of a big city type businessman.


* AchievementsInIgnorance: Played with in the movie ''Pippi on the Run,'' where it becomes a RunningGag: Throughout the movie, Pippi pulls off increasingly impossible things, only for Tommy or Annika to point out that what she's doing is impossible -- upon which Pippi will agree that yes, it probably is, and then never do that particular thing again. [[spoiler:Gloriously subverted at the very end of the movie, when Pippi rides a broomstick like a witch, and Tommy and Annika once again point out that this is impossible -- but then Pippi cries "It's not impossible to ''me!'' I can do ''everything!''" and continues her triumphant flight. (In the American dub, her line is: ''"You'' may know that the broom can't fly, but the ''broom'' doesn't know it!", making it a straighter example of the trope.)]]
* AdaptationDistillation: The 1969 Swedish TV series and its related movies take everything that was good about the books and crank it up to eleven, while removing just about everything that didn't work or was just pointless filler, resulting in a much tighter story structure that still left room for a fair amount of the spontaneous wackiness and [[SeinfeldianConversation surreal dialogue]] that are Pippi's trademarks. It's helped tremendously by tight scriptwriting and good actors (Inger Nilsson in the title role being the most prominent example). Astrid Lindgren herself was highly involved with this particular production, which explains why it's so much closer to the spirit of the books than its many successors.

to:

* AchievementsInIgnorance: Played with in the movie film ''Pippi on the Run,'' Run''. where it becomes a RunningGag: Throughout the movie, film, Pippi pulls off increasingly impossible things, only for Tommy or Annika to point out that what she's doing is impossible -- upon which Pippi will agree that yes, it probably is, and then never do that particular thing again. [[spoiler:Gloriously subverted at in the very end of the movie, climax, when Pippi rides a broomstick like a witch, and Tommy and Annika once again point out that this is impossible -- but then Pippi cries "It's not impossible to ''me!'' I can do ''everything!''" and continues her triumphant flight. (In the American dub, her line is: ''"You'' may know that the broom can't fly, but the ''broom'' doesn't know it!", making it a straighter example of the trope.)]]
* AdaptationDistillation: The 1969 Swedish TV series and its related movies films take everything that was good about the books and crank it up to eleven, UpToEleven, while removing just about everything that didn't work or was just pointless filler, resulting in a much tighter story structure that still left room for a fair amount of the spontaneous wackiness and [[SeinfeldianConversation surreal dialogue]] that are Pippi's trademarks. It's helped tremendously by tight scriptwriting and good actors (Inger Nilsson in the title role being the most prominent example). Astrid Lindgren herself was highly involved with this particular production, which explains why it's so much closer to the spirit of the books than its many successors.



** Mrs. Prysselius in the 1997 animated movie and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, slightly annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told,'' and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.

to:

** Mrs. Prysselius in the 1997 animated movie film and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, slightly annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told,'' told'', and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.



* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Christmas special of the animated series, where Dunder-Karlsson and Blom wants to go to prison, simply because it's the closest thing they have to a home. Sadly, they can't get in trouble because of too much Christmas spirit, even when they commit what they feel must be the ultimate crime-- stealing candy from a baby.
* CharacterExaggeration: One of the [[TropesAreNotBad good examples]] with Tommy and Annika in the 1969 TV series and its related movies -- in the books, while they do have some individual traits, they're mostly played up as contrasts to Pippi. In the series and movies (particularly the last one, ''Pippi On The Run'') their individual traits come across much more strongly: Tommy as the cheerful, easygoing older brother, Annika as the emotional, sensible younger sister.

to:

* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Christmas special of the animated series, where Dunder-Karlsson Thunder-Karlsson and Blom wants Bloom ''want'' to go to prison, simply because it's the closest thing they have to a home. Sadly, they can't get in trouble because of too much Christmas spirit, even when they commit what they feel must be the ultimate crime-- stealing candy from a baby.
* CharacterExaggeration: One of the [[TropesAreNotBad good examples]] with Tommy and Annika in the 1969 TV series and its related movies films -- in the books, while they do have some individual traits, they're mostly played up as contrasts to Pippi. In the series and movies films (particularly the last one, last, ''Pippi On The on the Run'') their individual traits come across much more strongly: Tommy as the cheerful, easygoing older brother, Annika as the emotional, sensible younger sister.



* DisneyAcidSequence: The Creator/{{Nelvana}} animated movie provides one during Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong.

to:

* DisneyAcidSequence: The Creator/{{Nelvana}} animated movie film provides one during Blom Bloom and Dunder-Karlsson's Thunder-Karlsson's IWantSong.



* TheOtherDarrin: The 1997 animated film and subsequent animated series share a large amount of cast and crew but Creator/CatherineOHara is replaced by Jill Frappier and Dave Thomas has his duties taken over by Len Carlson.



** Even though the books, TV shows, and movies all take place sometime in the 20th century, there's plenty of these guys running around in Pippi's universe -- and 17th century movie pirates, not the modern kind.

to:

** Even though the books, TV shows, shows and movies films all take place sometime in the 20th century, there's plenty of these guys running around in Pippi's universe -- and 17th century movie film pirates, not the modern kind.



** The third 1969-era movie is about Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue Pippi's father.

to:

** The third 1969-era movie is about film adaptation follows Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue Pippi's father.



*** That's based on the tail end of ''Pippi Goes On Board''. As the ''Hoptoad'' pulls away from the dock her dad throws her a new suitcase full of money. It lands in the water, but she jumps in and retrieves it.

to:

*** That's based on the tail end of ''Pippi Goes On on Board''. As the ''Hoptoad'' pulls away from the dock her dad throws her a new suitcase full of money. It lands in the water, but she jumps in and retrieves it.


Added DiffLines:

* YuppieCouple: The third episode of the 1998 animated series features an antagonist in the form of a big city type businessman.

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