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->“''What in me is dark''\\
''Illumine, what is low raise and support'';\\
''That to the height of this great argument''\\
''I may assert eternal Providence'',\\
''And justify the ways of God to men''.”
--> -- '''Book 1, Line 22-26'''

''Paradise Lost'' is Creator/JohnMilton’s sprawling [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] which explores the Fall of Man and reconciles {{God}}’s omniscience with Free Will. First published in ten books in 1667, the twelve-book version modern readers will be familiar with came out in 1674.

to:

->“''What ->''"What in me is dark''\\
''Illumine,
dark\\
Illumine,
what is low raise and support'';\\
''That
support;\\
That
to the height of this great argument''\\
''I
argument\\
I
may assert eternal Providence'',\\
''And
Providence,\\
And
justify the ways of God to men''.”
--> --
men."''
-->--
'''Book 1, Line 22-26'''

''Paradise Lost'' is Creator/JohnMilton’s Creator/JohnMilton's sprawling [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] which explores the Fall of Man and reconciles {{God}}’s {{God}}'s omniscience with Free Will. First published in ten books in 1667, the twelve-book version modern readers will be familiar with came out in 1674.



-->''No light, but rather darkness visible''
* DeadpanSnarker: “To whom thus Satan with contemptuous brow./Gabriel? thou hadst in Heaven the esteem of wise,/And such I held thee; but this question asked/Puts me in doubt (Book IV, 883-886)."

to:

-->''No -->''"No light, but rather darkness visible''
visible"''
* DeadpanSnarker: “To "To whom thus Satan with contemptuous brow./Gabriel? thou hadst in Heaven the esteem of wise,/And such I held thee; but this question asked/Puts me in doubt (Book IV, 883-886)."



-->''Abashed the devil stood''\\
''And felt how awful Goodness is''\\
''And saw Virtue in her shape how lovely''\\
''Saw, and pined his loss...''

to:

-->''Abashed -->''"Abashed the devil stood''\\
''And
stood\\
And
felt how awful Goodness is''\\
''And
is\\
And
saw Virtue in her shape how lovely''\\
''Saw,
lovely\\
Saw,
and pined his loss...''"''



-->''So farwel Hope, and with Hope farwel Fear''

to:

-->''So -->''"So farwel Hope, and with Hope farwel Fear''Fear."''


->"''What in me is dark''\\

to:

->"''What ->“''What in me is dark''\\



''And justify the ways of God to men''."

to:

''And justify the ways of God to men''."



''Paradise Lost'' is Creator/JohnMilton's sprawling [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] which explores the Fall of Man and reconciles {{God}}'s omniscience with Free Will. First published in ten books in 1667, the twelve-book version modern readers will be familiar with came out in 1674.

to:

''Paradise Lost'' is Creator/JohnMilton's Creator/JohnMilton’s sprawling [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] which explores the Fall of Man and reconciles {{God}}'s {{God}}’s omniscience with Free Will. First published in ten books in 1667, the twelve-book version modern readers will be familiar with came out in 1674.


Added DiffLines:



* ItsPronouncedTroPAY: Raphael was actually pronounced Ray-fee-al in Milton's time.

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* ItsPronouncedTroPAY: ItIsPronouncedTroPAY: Raphael was actually pronounced Ray-fee-al in Milton's time.


* YouAreWorthHell: Adam recognizes that Eve damned herself by eating from the forbidden fruit, but he feels so connected to her that he eats the fruit and falls so that he can continue to be with "the flesh of his flesh." The logical consequences of this trope follows when the evil and selfishness Adam accepts by falling immediately turns him against Eve, who he sees now as an inhuman devil who is entirely to blame for his fall.

to:

* YouAreWorthHell: Adam recognizes that Eve damned herself by eating from the forbidden fruit, but he feels so connected to her that he eats the fruit and falls so that he can continue to be with "the flesh of his flesh." The logical consequences of this trope follows when the evil and selfishness Adam accepts by falling immediately turns him against Eve, who whom he sees now as an inhuman devil who is entirely to blame for his fall.


* ThroneMadeOfX: After ranting for all of Book I about how God arrogantly sat on His throne above all creation, Satan begins Book II by creating and taking his own throne in Hell, which is made from more pearls and gold then India, the trade kingdom of Ormus, or any land in "the gorgeous east" could ever muster.

to:

* ThroneMadeOfX: After ranting for all of Book I about how God arrogantly sat on His throne above all creation, Satan begins Book II by creating and taking his own throne in Hell, which is made from more pearls and gold then than India, the trade kingdom of Ormus, or any land in "the gorgeous east" could ever muster.


* RevengeThroughCorruption: Satan mentions rumors about God planning to create man in order to rouse the fallen angels, a rumor Beelzebub spins into a battle plan to do as much damage to God as possible by turning His beloved creation to evil and take away His joy. Of course, its impossible to make an immutable God less of anything and to thwart an omnipotent one, so the effort is pointless while also being doomed to fail.

to:

* RevengeThroughCorruption: Satan mentions rumors about God planning to create man in order to rouse the fallen angels, a rumor Beelzebub spins into a battle plan to do as much damage to God as possible by turning His beloved creation to evil and take away His joy. Of course, its it's impossible to make an immutable God less of anything and or to thwart an omnipotent one, so the effort is pointless while also being doomed to fail.


* LoveMakesYouEvil: Adam's fall, and thus the fall of all mankind, comes about as a result of his absolute adoration of Eve, who he can't bear to live in Paradise without. As soon as he falls for her, Adam blames Eve for his own decision and he insults her until she bursts into tears.

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* LoveMakesYouEvil: Adam's fall, and thus the fall of all mankind, comes about as a result of his absolute adoration of Eve, who without whom he can't bear to live live, not even in Paradise without. Paradise. As soon as he falls for her, Adam blames Eve for his own decision decision, and he insults her until she bursts into tears.

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* UnbuiltTrope: This is the first work of fiction to depict Satan as an empathetic character, but it also viciously subverts and deconstructs the idea of him actually being [[SatanIsGood a good person]]. For starters, he's a {{hypocrite}} who justifies his rebellion against God using democratic and egalitarian ideas, but nevertheless rules Hell as an absolute monarch. When his justifications aren't hypocritical, they're fallacious and self-defeating. He even gradually admits to himself that his rhetoric is just him lying to himself and others, and that at the end of the day, he's just a petty, sadistic, vindictive rebel without a cause trying to bring everybody else down to his level.

Added DiffLines:

* AlienGeometries: An early example occurs in Milton's description of Chaos' domain. It isn't easy for even a former archangel like Satan to navigate before he builds a bridge between Hell and Earth.

Added DiffLines:

* AngelsDevilsAndSquid: Yes really, although the focus is very much on the former two. The "squid" faction is represented by Chaos and his courtiers.


Notably focusing largely on {{Satan}} (then known as ''Lucifer''), ''Paradise Lost'' is a retelling of the third chapter of [[Literature/BookOfGenesis Genesis]] in the form of an epic poem with the addition of flashbacks to the war between Satan and the angels, clear references to [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} the Son of God]], and visions provided by the ArchangelMichael that show Adam what happens in later parts of Literature/TheBible. In epic theory (and yes, such a thing exists), ''Paradise Lost'' is the final epic, as it has elements of everything from ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' up through ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' and ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene''.

to:

Notably focusing largely on {{Satan}} (then known as ''Lucifer''), [[{{Satan}} the infernal Serpent]], ''Paradise Lost'' is a retelling of the third chapter of [[Literature/BookOfGenesis Genesis]] in the form of an epic poem with the addition of flashbacks to the war between Satan and the angels, clear references to [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} the Son of God]], and visions provided by the ArchangelMichael that show Adam what happens in later parts of Literature/TheBible. In epic theory (and yes, such a thing exists), ''Paradise Lost'' is the final epic, as it has elements of everything from ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' up through ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' and ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene''.



* ArchangelMichael: Michael is a total badass and the GoodCounterpart to Lucifer. Michael cuts off the Devil's entire right side to introduce him to pain and helps Adam adjust to pain by showing him that salvation will be offered in the future.

to:

* ArchangelMichael: Michael is a total badass and the GoodCounterpart to Lucifer.the Serpent. Michael cuts off the Devil's entire right side to introduce him to pain and helps Adam adjust to pain by showing him that salvation will be offered in the future.



* DivinelyAppearingDemons: Lucifer has increasingly grown hideous and small upon falling, but in order to sneak into Paradise, he takes an angelic appearance. It fools the [[InformedAttribute all-seeing]] Uriel. His disguise only falters when his chaotic and tortured emotions cause his disguise the fluctuate at the edge of Uriel's vision.

to:

* DivinelyAppearingDemons: Lucifer The Devil has increasingly grown hideous and small upon falling, but in order to sneak into Paradise, he takes an angelic appearance. It fools the [[InformedAttribute all-seeing]] Uriel. His disguise only falters when his chaotic and tortured emotions cause his disguise the fluctuate at the edge of Uriel's vision.



* EvilMakesYouUgly: The angels cannot recognize Satan as Lucifer, owing to his changed looks.

to:

* EvilMakesYouUgly: The angels patrolling Eden cannot recognize Satan as Lucifer, the beautiful angel who rebelled, owing to his changed looks.the corrosive effects of sin.



* LightIsNotGood: The name "Lucifer" literally means "light-bearer" in Latin and in ''Paradise Lost'', it turns out Lucifer was the brightest angel before his fall. When waging War in Heaven, Satan rides in a chariot as bright as the sun adorned with cherubs and gold, showing that the Devil [[AGodAmI worships himself as God]].

to:

* LightIsNotGood: The name "Lucifer" literally means "light-bearer" in Latin and in In ''Paradise Lost'', it turns out Lucifer the Serpent from Genesis 3 was the brightest angel of the angels before his fall. When waging War in Heaven, Satan rides in a chariot as bright as the sun adorned with cherubs and gold, showing that the Devil [[AGodAmI worships himself as God]].



* MeaningfulName: A few, even disregarding the fact that "Adam" means "manking" or "a human" in Hebrew. "Lucifer" means "light-bearer," as has been noted. "Abdiel" is particularly apt--he's the only angel loyal to God among Satan's original troops, and his name means "Servant of God."[[note]]It's cognate with Arabic names like "Abd-al-aziz", which mean "the Servant of ..."[[/note]] It's actually a human name in the Bible, but apparently it fit so well that Milton chose to use it for the angel.

to:

* MeaningfulName: A few, even disregarding the fact that "Adam" means "manking" or "a human" in Hebrew. "Lucifer" means "light-bearer," as has been noted. "Abdiel" is particularly apt--he's the only angel loyal to God among Satan's original troops, and his name means "Servant of God."[[note]]It's cognate with Arabic names like "Abd-al-aziz", which mean "the Servant of ..."[[/note]] It's actually a human name in the Bible, but apparently it fit so well that Milton chose to use it for the angel.



* OddNameOut: For the angels we have Abdiel, Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, Uriel, etc. (Hebrew Names) and Lucifer (The Latin One).

to:

* %%* OddNameOut: For the angels we have Abdiel, Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, Uriel, etc. (Hebrew Names) and Lucifer (The Latin One).



* PrideBeforeAFall: We meet TheLegionsOfHell just after they fall from Heaven; Raphael tells us about Lucifer's disastrous [[RageAgainstTheHeavens War in Heaven]] in Book VI.

to:

* PrideBeforeAFall: We meet TheLegionsOfHell just after they fall from Heaven; Raphael tells us about Lucifer's the Devil's disastrous [[RageAgainstTheHeavens War in Heaven]] in Book VI.



* StartOfDarkness: Book V and Book VI are prequels to the rest of the narrative and recount how Lucifer became Satan and rallied other envious Angels to overturn God's omnibenevolent reign. That went as well as any other swing at the Omnipotent and Hell got a lot cozier for the rest of history.

to:

* StartOfDarkness: Book V and Book VI are prequels to the rest of the narrative and recount how Lucifer the highest of the angels became Satan and rallied other envious Angels to overturn God's omnibenevolent reign. That went as well as any other swing at the Omnipotent and Hell got a lot cozier for the rest of history.


* AdaptationalEarlyAppearance: Raphael and Michael both talk to Adam in the Garden of Eden, even though both first appear long after his death in [[Literature/TheBible the biblical canon]].

to:

* AdaptationalEarlyAppearance: Raphael and Michael both talk to Adam in the Garden of Eden, even though both are first appear mentioned long after his death in [[Literature/TheBible the biblical canon]].


* AdaptationalHeroism: Genesis portrays the Serpent as being chiefly responsible for his action and in the last book of the biblical canon, it becomes clear that the Serpent was Satan all along. In Milton's mind, the serpent was just a mindless animal whose body Satan possessed to carry out his plans. The serpent is just a hapless victim of the Devil's scheming, more innocent than even Adam and Eve.

to:

* AdaptationalHeroism: Genesis portrays the Serpent as being chiefly responsible for his action action, and in the last book of the biblical canon, canon it becomes clear that the Serpent was Satan all along. In Milton's mind, the serpent was just a mindless animal whose body Satan possessed to carry out his plans. The serpent is just a hapless victim of the Devil's scheming, more innocent than even Adam and Eve.


%%* AllLovingHero: The Son, aka Jesus.

to:

%%* * AllLovingHero: The Son, aka Jesus.Jesus, is of course the redemption of all mankind.



%%* BlackAndWhiteMorality[=/=]BlackAndGrayMorality[=/=]GreyAndGrayMorality[=/=]EvilVersusEvil: The book has been interpreted countless ways over the centuries.

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%%* BlackAndWhiteMorality[=/=]BlackAndGrayMorality[=/=]GreyAndGrayMorality[=/=]EvilVersusEvil: The book has been interpreted countless ways over the centuries.* BlackAndWhiteMorality: With God is good, even if you have trouble accepting that. With Satan is evil, even if he ''seems'' appealing.



** Satan claims to be a self-created being, arms himself with a chariot in imitation the Son of God's, and declares himself invincible, only for Michael to come up to him and cut his right side off his body. This introduction to pain left the Devil whimpering in agony as his footsoldiers carried his body away from the battle.

to:

** Satan claims to be a self-created being, arms himself with a chariot in imitation the Son of God's, and declares himself invincible, only for Michael to come up to him and cut his right side off his body. This introduction to pain left leaves the Devil whimpering in agony as his footsoldiers carried foot soldiers carry his body away from the battle.



%%* ByronicHero: Satan.

to:

%%* * ByronicHero: Satan.Satan is an exceptional, extremely charismatic and deeply flawed creature who rebels against his society (Heaven) and grapples with his morality. As with many examples of this trope, in spite of the name, Satan is an AntiVillain.



* DecompositeCharacter: Milton takes the Serpent from the Genesis story and turns him into both an actual serpent as mindless as any other and the Devil, who possesses the body of said animal to carry out his revenge.

to:

* DecompositeCharacter: Milton takes the Serpent from the Genesis story and turns him into both an actual serpent as mindless as any other and the Devil, who possesses the body of said animal serpent to carry out his revenge.



%%* TheJuggernaut: When The Son becomes "Gloomie as Night", he is The Juggernaut.

to:

%%* * TheJuggernaut: When The the Son becomes "Gloomie as Night", he is The Juggernaut.takes the field, his terrifying and unstoppable charge causes all the rebelling angels to throw themselves into Hell to flee him.



* TheLegionsOfHell: Satan gives his NewEraSpeech to them.

to:

* TheLegionsOfHell: Satan gives recruits his rebelling angels with a NewEraSpeech and forms them into an army to them.attack Heaven.



%%* NobleDemon: Some readers interpret the demons this way, since their motives resemble modern ideas about individuality and liberty. Milton probably intended the demons to evoke a certain amount of sympathy, degenerating quickly to pity, but they read differently to some modern audiences, suffice it to say.



%%* PyrrhicVillainy: Satan, who knows and laments the fact, but just can't let go.

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%%* * PyrrhicVillainy: Satan, who knows and laments the fact, but just can't let go.fact that any victory he achieves is purely out of spite and does not improve his situation.



%%* RageAgainstTheHeavens: {{Satan}}'s entire arc. It doesn't end well for him.

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%%* * RageAgainstTheHeavens: {{Satan}}'s entire arc. It doesn't end well for him.{{Satan}} has whole speeches railing against God.



%%* RousingSpeech: Beezelbub in the first book.

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%%* * RousingSpeech: Beezelbub delivers a rousing speech in the first book.book to the rest of the fallen angels on what they should do.

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* {{Hypocrite}}: Satan's arguments against God are founded largely on principles of democracy and egalitarianism, but he himself is an absolute monarch in Hell and asserts that everybody agreed to make him leader without asking anyone to vote. The demons are all too stupid to notice the hypocrisy, but Gabriel exposes the Devil's lies with every verse he gets.

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