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* AltumVidetur: With a tendency to CanisLatinicus. Again, this is typical for Polish noblemen in XVI-XVII century. Example:
-->'''Gerwazy''': ogłosić Intromisyją Hrabi do zamku, do dworu\\Sopliców, do wsi, gruntów zasianych, ugoru,\\Słowem, ''cum gais, boris et graniciebus,\\Kmetonibus, scultetis, et omnibus rebus\\Et quibusdam aliis.''


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* GratuitousLatin: With a tendency to CanisLatinicus. Again, this is typical for Polish noblemen in XVI-XVII century. Example:
-->'''Gerwazy''': ogłosić Intromisyją Hrabi do zamku, do dworu\\Sopliców, do wsi, gruntów zasianych, ugoru,\\Słowem, ''cum gais, boris et graniciebus,\\Kmetonibus, scultetis, et omnibus rebus\\Et quibusdam aliis.''


* DeathbedConfession: [[spoiler: Of Jacek Soplica to Gerwazy]], who (finally and with some hesitation) [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming forgives]].

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* DeathbedConfession: [[spoiler: Of Jacek Soplica to Gerwazy]], who (finally and with some hesitation) [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming forgives]].forgives.


* BadassGrandpa: Maciej "The Rod" Dobrzyński, [[ThePatriarch the patriarch]] of Dobrzyński [[TheClan family]] is still quite fit and delivers a [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown]] to Russian soldiers during the battle.

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* BadassGrandpa: Maciej "The Rod" Dobrzyński, [[ThePatriarch the patriarch]] of Dobrzyński [[TheClan family]] is still quite fit and delivers a [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown]] NoHoldsBarredBeatdown to Russian soldiers during the battle.


* BadassGrandpa: Maciej "The Rod" Dobrzyński, [[ThePatriarch the patriarch]] of Dobrzyński [[TheClan family]] is still quite fit and kicks Russians' ass during the battle.

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* BadassGrandpa: Maciej "The Rod" Dobrzyński, [[ThePatriarch the patriarch]] of Dobrzyński [[TheClan family]] is still quite fit and kicks Russians' ass delivers a [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown]] to Russian soldiers during the battle.


* TrueArtIsAncient: The Count wants this castle because it's so gothic-looking (he's a Romantic artist).

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* TrueArtIsAncient: The InUniverse - the Count wants this castle because it's so gothic-looking (he's a Romantic artist).


The national [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] of both Poland and Lithuania, written by Adam Mickiewicz (1798-1855), '''Pan Tadeusz''', or [[ShortTitleLongElaborateSubtitle Pan Tadeusz, czyli Ostatni zajazd na Litwie: historia szlachecka z roku 1811 i 1812 we dwunastu ksiegach wierszem]] ("Mr. Tadeusz, or The Last Inn in Lithuania: the story of nobles from year 1811 and 1812 in twelve rhymed books"), tells us of the [[FeudingFamilies struggle between the noble families]] of Soplica and Horeszko and its dissolution, or the titular "zajazd" (which meant one nobleman raiding another's lands, a XVI-XVII century custom, not really practiced anymore in the XIX).

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The national [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] of both Poland and Lithuania, written by Adam Mickiewicz (1798-1855), '''Pan Tadeusz''', or [[ShortTitleLongElaborateSubtitle Pan Tadeusz, czyli Ostatni zajazd na Litwie: historia szlachecka z roku 1811 i 1812 we dwunastu ksiegach wierszem]] ("Mr. Tadeusz, or The Last Inn Foray in Lithuania: the story of nobles from year 1811 and 1812 in twelve rhymed books"), tells us of the [[FeudingFamilies struggle between the noble families]] of Soplica and Horeszko and its dissolution, or the titular "zajazd" (which meant one nobleman raiding another's lands, a XVI-XVII century custom, not really practiced anymore in the XIX).


* GoodGuyBar: Jankiel's inn. He sells good drinks for reasonable money and plays cimbalom better than anyone (supposedly he brought ''Mazurek Dąbrowskiego'' from his travels).

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* GoodGuyBar: Jankiel's inn. He sells good drinks for at reasonable money prices and plays cimbalom better than anyone (supposedly he brought ''Mazurek Dąbrowskiego'' from his travels).


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* GreedyJew: Defied. The narrator specifically states that while Jankiel likes making an honest buck as much as the next man, his dealings are so scrupulously straight even the most raging anti-semites around have never accused him of being greedy or a cheat.


The national [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] of both Poland and Lithuania, written by Adam Mickiewicz (1798-1855), '''Pan Tadeusz''', or [[ShortTitleLongElaborateSubtitle Pan Tadeusz, czyli Ostatni zajazd na Litwie: historia szlachecka z roku 1811 i 1812 we dwunastu ksiegach wierszem]], tells us of the [[FeudingFamilies struggle between the noble families]] of Soplica and Horeszko and its dissolution, or the titular "zajazd" (which meant one nobleman raiding another's lands, a XVI-XVII century custom, not really practiced anymore in the XIX).

to:

The national [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] of both Poland and Lithuania, written by Adam Mickiewicz (1798-1855), '''Pan Tadeusz''', or [[ShortTitleLongElaborateSubtitle Pan Tadeusz, czyli Ostatni zajazd na Litwie: historia szlachecka z roku 1811 i 1812 we dwunastu ksiegach wierszem]], wierszem]] ("Mr. Tadeusz, or The Last Inn in Lithuania: the story of nobles from year 1811 and 1812 in twelve rhymed books"), tells us of the [[FeudingFamilies struggle between the noble families]] of Soplica and Horeszko and its dissolution, or the titular "zajazd" (which meant one nobleman raiding another's lands, a XVI-XVII century custom, not really practiced anymore in the XIX).


1811, young Tadeusz Soplica comes back home just in time to witness the resolution of the quarrel his paternal uncle and the count Horeszko have about a (not so ancient) castle. He then [[LoveAtFirstSight catches a glimpse of a very pretty girl]]...

The national [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] of both Poland and Lithuania, written by Adam Mickiewicz (1798-1855), '''Pan Tadeusz''', or [[ShortTitleLongElaborateSubtitle Pan Tadeusz, czyli Ostatni zajazd na Litwie: historia szlachecka z roku 1811 i 1812 we dwunastu ksiegach wierszem]] tells us of the [[FeudingFamilies struggle between the noble families]] of Soplica and Horeszko and its dissolution, or the titular "zajazd" (which meant one nobleman raiding another's lands, a XVI-XVII century custom, not really practiced anymore in the XIX).

Written in years 1832-1832, the poem was meant to comfort the members of Polish emigration in France after the trauma of the lost November Uprising. It is set, though, before the [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars Napoleon's Russian campaign]] (and at its beggining, a little), which was a huge surge of hope for Poland's restoration (see [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congress_of_Vienna the Other Wiki]] for more information on how that turned out for Poland), much like the Uprising was.

Gained a cult following among Polish intellectual class ("inteligencja"[[labelnote:read]]intelligentsia[[/labelnote]]), eventually becoming the CultClassic of Polish literature.

to:

In 1811, young Tadeusz Soplica comes back home just in time to witness the resolution of the quarrel his paternal uncle and the count Horeszko have about a (not so ancient) castle. He then [[LoveAtFirstSight catches a glimpse of a very pretty girl]]...

The national [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] of both Poland and Lithuania, written by Adam Mickiewicz (1798-1855), '''Pan Tadeusz''', or [[ShortTitleLongElaborateSubtitle Pan Tadeusz, czyli Ostatni zajazd na Litwie: historia szlachecka z roku 1811 i 1812 we dwunastu ksiegach wierszem]] wierszem]], tells us of the [[FeudingFamilies struggle between the noble families]] of Soplica and Horeszko and its dissolution, or the titular "zajazd" (which meant one nobleman raiding another's lands, a XVI-XVII century custom, not really practiced anymore in the XIX).

Written in years 1832-1832, 1832 and published in 1834, the poem was meant to comfort the members of the Polish emigration in France after the trauma of the lost November Uprising. It is set, though, before the [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars Napoleon's Russian campaign]] (and at its beggining, beginning, a little), which was a huge surge of hope for Poland's restoration (see [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congress_of_Vienna the Other Wiki]] for more information on how that turned out for Poland), much like the Uprising was.

Gained a cult following among the Polish intellectual class ("inteligencja"[[labelnote:read]]intelligentsia[[/labelnote]]), eventually becoming the CultClassic of Polish literature.


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** Captain Rykov, a decent, honorable Russian officer who wants to release the raiders unpunished and later admits that Poland should belong to the Polish, to Major Płut - a Polish renegade who gleefully speaks about hanging, flogging and banishing to Syberia of the "Polish rebels".

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** Captain Rykov, a decent, honorable Russian officer who wants to release the raiders unpunished and later admits that Poland should belong to the Polish, to Major Płut - a Polish renegade who gleefully speaks about hanging, flogging and banishing to Syberia Siberia of the "Polish rebels".


* PutTheirHeadsTogether: The first, subtle sign of father Robak's [[{{Badass}} badassery]] is using this trope to put an end to a row between two characters (in book II).

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* PutTheirHeadsTogether: The first, subtle sign of father Robak's [[{{Badass}} badassery]] badassery is using this trope to put an end to a row between two characters (in book II).



* ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption: Gerwazy thinks so - courts are so expensive and take forever, after all.

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* ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption: Gerwazy thinks so - courts are so expensive and take forever, after all.


** But keep in mind all the aristocratic titles were given by the foreign monarchs (except Lithuania due to GrandfatherClause). Actual Polish gentry valued its equality very highly (i.e. you could have been a "naked" with naught but your sabre to your name, but still take no orders from any "prince".
* TheClan: The Dobrzyński family

to:

** But keep in mind all the aristocratic titles were given by the foreign monarchs (except Lithuania due to GrandfatherClause). Actual Polish gentry valued its equality very highly (i.e. you could have been a "naked" with naught but your sabre to your name, but still take no orders from any "prince".
"prince").
* TheClan: The Dobrzyński familyfamily.



* PerfectlyArrangedMarriage: [[spoiler: Tadeusz and Zosia]], set up by Jacek as part of his atoning (the young lady is the daughter of his [[StarCrossedLovers lost beloved]], he's been financing her upbringing.

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* PerfectlyArrangedMarriage: [[spoiler: Tadeusz and Zosia]], set up by Jacek as part of his atoning (the young lady is the daughter of his [[StarCrossedLovers lost beloved]], he's been financing her upbringing.upbringing).

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** But keep in mind all the aristocratic titles were given by the foreign monarchs (except Lithuania due to GrandfatherClause). Actual Polish gentry valued its equality very highly (i.e. you could have been a "naked" with naught but your sabre to your name, but still take no orders from any "prince".


Adapted into feature films

to:

Adapted into feature films
films.



* AllThereInTheManual: The author wrote footnotes explaining in details many aspects of the story and describing some mentioned characters, items and events

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* AllThereInTheManual: The author wrote footnotes explaining in details many aspects of the story and describing some mentioned characters, items and eventsevents.



* MilesGloriosus: The Count. He claims to have captured and executed a band of brigands in Sicily. Although he does [[LetsGetDangerous show his prowess]] while dueling with captain Rykov.

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* MilesGloriosus: The Count. He claims to have captured and executed a band of brigands in Sicily. Although he does [[LetsGetDangerous show his prowess]] while dueling with captain Rykov.Rykov, so perhaps CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass?



* PlanetOfSteves: The Dobrzyński family, where men are named either Bartek or Maciej. For convenience sake, they use nicknames, usually given after their cool and weird weaponry.

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* PlanetOfSteves: The Dobrzyński family, where men are named either Bartek or Maciej.Maciej (their daughters' names are invariably Katarzyna or Maryna). For convenience sake, they use nicknames, usually given after their cool and weird weaponry.

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