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* SceneryPorn: Both films were made on-location in Zimbabwe, and the filmmakers occasionally give us some good views of the area, particularly a stunning extended shot of Victoria Falls in the sequel.


* LighterAndSofter: The original tale wasn't exactly dark per se, but there was a definite serious tone to it and had very little (if ''any'') humor. This adaptation on the other hand? Not only does the movie crank up the jokes [[UpToEleven elevenfold]], it also takes itself far less seriously with a much campier tone overall. By contrast, ''Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold'' tries to be a more of a straight adventure tale (unwisely, since they [[NoBudget lacked the budget]] for any sort of convincing special effects, leading to quite a bit of {{Narm}}).

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* LighterAndSofter: The original tale wasn't exactly dark per se, but there was a definite serious tone to it and had very little (if ''any'') humor. This adaptation on the other hand? Not only does the movie crank up the jokes [[UpToEleven elevenfold]], it also takes itself far less seriously with a much campier tone overall. By contrast, ''Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold'' tries to be a more of a straight adventure tale (unwisely, since they [[NoBudget lacked the budget]] for any sort of convincing special effects, leading to quite a bit of {{Narm}}).


It was enormously successful, launching the JungleOpera genre, and was followed by over a dozen sequels and prequels featuring the protagonist Allan Quatermain, including a crossover with Haggard's other most famous novel, ''Literature/{{She}}''. It has been adapted for film and television many times, including a 1937 film that starred Cedric Hardwicke as Quatermain and Paul Robeson as Umbopa, a British film from 1950 that starred Stewart Granger as Quatermain and Creator/DeborahKerr as Elizabeth Curtis, a 1985 film starring Richard Chamberlain and Creator/SharonStone, and a TV movie in 2004 starring Creator/PatrickSwayze and Alison Doody.

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It was enormously successful, launching the JungleOpera genre, and was followed by over a dozen sequels and prequels featuring the protagonist Allan Quatermain, including a crossover with Haggard's other most famous novel, ''Literature/{{She}}''. It has been adapted for film and television many times, including a 1937 film that starred Cedric Hardwicke as Quatermain and Paul Robeson as Umbopa, a British film from 1950 that starred Stewart Granger as Quatermain and Creator/DeborahKerr as Elizabeth Curtis, a 1985 film starring Richard Chamberlain and Creator/SharonStone, Creator/SharonStone (with a simultaneously-filmed sequel, ''Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold''), and a TV movie in 2004 starring Creator/PatrickSwayze and Alison Doody.



* LighterAndSofter: The original tale wasn't exactly dark per se, but there was a definite serious tone to it and had very little (if ''any'') humor. This adaptation on the other hand? Not only does the movie crank up the jokes [[UpToEleven elevenfold]], it also takes itself far less seriously with a much campier tone overall.

to:

* LighterAndSofter: The original tale wasn't exactly dark per se, but there was a definite serious tone to it and had very little (if ''any'') humor. This adaptation on the other hand? Not only does the movie crank up the jokes [[UpToEleven elevenfold]], it also takes itself far less seriously with a much campier tone overall. By contrast, ''Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold'' tries to be a more of a straight adventure tale (unwisely, since they [[NoBudget lacked the budget]] for any sort of convincing special effects, leading to quite a bit of {{Narm}}).

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* RecklessGunUsage: Invoked. Quatermain stores his guns in the way most likely to cause a discharge, in order to discourage the person whom he leaves them with from stealing or otherwise tampering with them.

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* {{Battlecry}} The Kukuana battlecry is the name of their leader and the word "Kili!", meaning "Smite!"


* ClusterFBomb: When askes to do his part in ”cursing” the moon, Good does so. For ten minutes. In multiple languages. Hearing his tirade leaves Quatermain, who is noted to loathe harsh language, incapable of other feelings than awe.

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* ClusterFBomb: When askes to do his part in ”cursing” the moon, Good does so. For ten minutes. In multiple languages. Without repeating himself. Hearing his tirade leaves Quatermain, who is noted to loathe harsh language, incapable of other feelings than awe.



** That said, Quatermain finds a lot about Kukuana to admire, complimenting dancers, metalwork, poetry and oratory he finds.

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** That said, Quatermain finds a lot about Kukuana to admire, complimenting admire. He compliments the skill of the Kukuana dancers, the beauty of their metalwork, their leaders' skill at oratory, and the skill and discipline of their soldiers. While he finds their poetry and oratory to be needlessly repetitive, he finds.does not find it otherwise lacking.



* TreasureMap: Quatermain has one to the mines, given to him by a dying Portugese adventurer. He doesn't think much of it and never had any inclination to use it, but when Sir Henry needs to find his brother that went off after those same mines, they use Quatermain's map.

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* TreasureMap: Quatermain has one to the mines, given to him by a dying Portugese Portuguese adventurer. He doesn't think much of it and never had any inclination to use it, but when Sir Henry needs to find his brother that went off after those same mines, they use Quatermain's map.

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* ClusterFBomb: When askes to do his part in ”cursing” the moon, Good does so. For ten minutes. In multiple languages. Hearing his tirade leaves Quatermain, who is noted to loathe harsh language, incapable of other feelings than awe.


** Of course, Ignosi is a Kukuana and not a Zulu, and is identified as looking like a Kukuana the second he sets foot in Kukuanaland. Then again, this raises the question why the more admirable Kukuana are lighter-skinned than the Zulu.



** Gagool, being old enough to have seen lunar eclipses before, sees the ploy for what it is immediately and attempts to calm the frightened Kukuana. However, she is less scary than the eclipse and fails.



* HollywoodNatives: The Kukuanas, savage natives of unexplored Africa who attack all trespassers. They're easily convinced into accepting Quatermain's party as great white "visitors from the stars" by their false teeth, glass eyes, and pale uncovered legs. Note that Ignosi makes no attempt to correct this misconception.

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* HollywoodNatives: The Kukuanas, savage natives of unexplored Africa who attack all trespassers. They're easily convinced into accepting Quatermain's party as great white "visitors from the stars" by their false teeth, glass eyes, and pale uncovered legs. Note that Ignosi makes no attempt to correct this misconception.misconception until he speakern one-on-one with Infadus.
** That said, Quatermain finds a lot about Kukuana to admire, complimenting dancers, metalwork, poetry and oratory he finds.



* MightyWhitey: Sir Henry Curtis feels obligated to tell Ignosi not to conduct human sacrifices.

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* MightyWhitey: Sir Henry Curtis feels obligated to tell Ignosi not to conduct human sacrifices. He also manages to go toe-to-toe with several of Twala’s soldiers with Kukuana weapons in spite of never having trained with them.

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* DoomedPredecessor: In the mountains, the protagonists find the frozen body of José da Silvestra, the 16th-century explorer who drew the map that led them to Kukuanaland.


''King's Solomon's Mines'' is an adventure novel by Creator/HRiderHaggard, first published in 1885. Allan Quatermain is a hunter and wilderness guide in Africa. He is contracted by Sir Henry Curtis to find Curtis's brother George, who disappeared somewhere in DarkestAfrica in search of the legendary diamond mines of Literature/TheBible's King Solomon. Quatermain has no interest in diamond mines and isn't particularly interested in a wild goose chase either, but Sir Henry's promise of a very hefty reward that Quatermain can send to his son back in England gets Quatermain to agree. Also agreeing to go on the journey is Captain John Good, a former naval officer, and a native named Umbopa, who has a strangely proud, regal bearing, and an agenda of his own.

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''King's Solomon's Mines'' is an adventure novel by Creator/HRiderHaggard, first published in 1885.

Allan Quatermain is a hunter and wilderness guide in Africa. He is contracted by Sir Henry Curtis to find Curtis's brother George, who disappeared somewhere in DarkestAfrica in search of the legendary diamond mines of Literature/TheBible's King Solomon. Quatermain has no interest in diamond mines and isn't particularly interested in a wild goose chase either, but Sir Henry's promise of a very hefty reward that Quatermain can send to his son back in England gets Quatermain to agree. Also agreeing to go on the journey is Captain John Good, a former naval officer, and a native named Umbopa, who has a strangely proud, regal bearing, and an agenda of his own.


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tothosecassell1888268.jpeg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Illustration from first edition]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tothosecassell1888268.jpeg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Illustration [[caption-width-right:300:Illustration from the first edition]]
edition.]]


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* RaisedByWolves: Hendrika the BaboonWoman from ''Allan's Wife'' is, as might be guessed from her name, a woman who was raised by baboons. She is a servant to Stella's family, but the feral is never far from the surface in her.

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* RaisedByWolves: Hendrika the BaboonWoman Baboon Woman from ''Allan's Wife'' is, as might be guessed from her name, a woman who was raised by baboons. She is a servant to Stella's family, but the feral is never far from the surface in her.

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* RaisedByWolves: Hendrika the BaboonWoman from ''Allan's Wife'' is, as might be guessed from her name, a woman who was raised by baboons. She is a servant to Stella's family, but the feral is never far from the surface in her.

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* LostWorld: The novel's jungle civilization is one of the UrExamples of the trope.

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