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* TropesAreTools: They concede that most tropes, in the hands of skilled writers and in the right context, can be used effectively and well. They merely point out those that have a tendency to be used badly. In the introduction, they also note this in the context of the numerous other self-help books about creative writing already available, and how their book differs from these:

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* TropesAreTools: Administrivia/TropesAreTools: They concede that most tropes, in the hands of skilled writers and in the right context, can be used effectively and well. They merely point out those that have a tendency to be used badly. In the introduction, they also note this in the context of the numerous other self-help books about creative writing already available, and how their book differs from these:


* {{Narm}}: All of the bad writing examples are [[SoBadItsGood intentionally over-the-top bad]], but the [[http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0061357952/sr=8-1/qid=1261999387/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=916520&s=books&qid=1261999387&sr=8-1 chunk of text on the cover]] takes the cake. [[invoked]]

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* {{Narm}}: All of the bad writing examples are [[SoBadItsGood intentionally over-the-top bad]], but the [[http://www.[[https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0061357952/sr=8-1/qid=1261999387/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=916520&s=books&qid=1261999387&sr=8-1 com/dp/0061357952/#reader_0061357952 chunk of text on the cover]] takes the cake. [[invoked]]


-->This particular blunder is known as ''deus ex machina'', [[PardonMyFrench which is French for]] "[[YouHaveGotToBeKiddingMe Are you fucking kidding me?]]"

to:

-->This particular blunder is known as ''deus ex machina'', [[PardonMyFrench [[GratuitousFrench which is French for]] "[[YouHaveGotToBeKiddingMe Are you fucking kidding me?]]"


* FauxlosophicNarration: "The Overture" ''Wherein the prologue is a brief guide to the meaning of life''. Discouraged.

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* FauxlosophicNarration: "The Overture" ''Wherein the prologue is a brief guide to the meaning of life''. Discouraged.life'' and "Now With 20% More Homily!" (similar, but at the end of the work). Both discouraged.



* RedHerring: They encourage these ("The RedHerring on the Mantelpiece") to give a novel more depth, though they warn authors to be careful of unintentional examples (see WhatHappenedToTheMouse).

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* RedHerring: They encourage these ("The RedHerring on the Mantelpiece") to give a novel more depth, though they warn authors to be careful of watch out for unintentional examples (see WhatHappenedToTheMouse).



** However, the authors do concede that an occasional adverb can be helpful when it adds nuance that written dialogue alone may not convey. They comment that "'I love you, all right' he said jokingly" is worlds apart from "'I love you, all right' he said coldly." But adverbs that add no meaning ("lovingly") or are unusual and distracting ("lambently") are best left off.

to:

** However, the authors do concede that an occasional adverb can be helpful when it adds nuance that written the dialogue alone may not convey. They comment that "'I love you, all right' he said jokingly" is worlds apart from "'I love you, all right' he said coldly." But adverbs that add no meaning ("lovingly") or are unusual and distracting ("lambently") ("effervescently") are best left off.



* SceneryPorn: "Vacation Slideshow" features endless descriptions of exotic landscapes, with no bearing on characterization and story. The trope is discouraged if it goes on for too long and does not add any substance.

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* SceneryPorn: "Vacation Slideshow" features endless descriptions of exotic landscapes, with no bearing on characterization and story. The trope is discouraged if it goes on for because these tend to run too long and does not add any no substance.



* ShownTheirWork: "The Research Paper." "...But the glories of the Calvin cycle, and the further intricacies of the Krebs cycle, essential to cellular respiration, were little comfort now that...". While they encourage doing proper research on any subject an author wants to include in their story, the author should not show off to the extent of confusing most readers.

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* ShownTheirWork: "The Research Paper." "...But the glories of the Calvin cycle, and the further intricacies of the Krebs cycle, essential to cellular respiration, were little comfort now that...". While they encourage doing proper research on any subject an author wants to include in their story, the author should not show off needs to know what details are accurate to the extent setting, he/she also needs to know how to make those details a natural part of confusing most readers.the narrative instead of just [[InfoDump dumping them in]].


* ThePlotReaper: "Goodbye, Cruel Reader!" They say it's a bad idea and should only be used when absolutely necessary, and only when the writer has used ChekhovsGun to establish a heart condition/suicidal fixation/unsafe building etc.

to:

* ThePlotReaper: "Goodbye, Cruel Reader!" They say it's a bad idea and should only discourage having Bob the Villain kick off just for narrative convenience. If this trope is going to be used when absolutely necessary, and only when used, the writer has used ChekhovsGun needs to establish a heart [[ChekhovsGun set up Bob's impending death]] so that it doesn't just come out of nowhere (heart condition/suicidal fixation/unsafe building etc.)



* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Discouraged in "The Vegan Viking" and, to a lesser extent, in "Hello, I Am the Medieval Knight!". While it's usually done to avoid Values Dissonance, giving your 14th-century character neoliberal attitudes towards homosexuality (or neoconservative attitudes towards economics) will undermine your efforts to persuade readers that your story is taking place in the 14th century.
* PostModernism: "Hello! I Am the Author!" They recommend not trying it because, even though some people manage to pull it off, it's really, really hard to do. This includes using:

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* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Discouraged in "The Vegan Viking" and, to a lesser extent, in "Hello, I Am the Medieval Knight!". While it's usually done to avoid Values Dissonance, giving your 14th-century character neoliberal attitudes towards homosexuality (or neoconservative attitudes towards economics) will merely undermine your efforts to persuade readers that your story is taking place in the 14th century.
* PostModernism: "Hello! I Am the Author!" They recommend not trying it because, even though some people manage to pull it off, because it's really, really hard to do.do well. This includes using:


* YouWatchTooMuchX: [[GrossOutShow "The Unruly Zit"]] -- In which the author has read too much [[Creator/CharlesBukowski Bukowski.]]

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* YouWatchTooMuchX: [[GrossOutShow "The "[[GrossOutShow 'The Unruly Zit"]] Zit']] -- In which When the author has read too much [[Creator/CharlesBukowski Bukowski.]]]]"


* YouWatchTooMuchX: [[NauseaFuel "The Unruly Zit"]] -- In which the author has read too much [[Creator/CharlesBukowski Bukowski.]]

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* YouWatchTooMuchX: [[NauseaFuel [[GrossOutShow "The Unruly Zit"]] -- In which the author has read too much [[Creator/CharlesBukowski Bukowski.]]

Added DiffLines:

* YouWatchTooMuchX: [[NauseaFuel "The Unruly Zit"]] -- In which the author has read too much [[Creator/CharlesBukowski Bukowski.]]


** However, the authors do concede that the judicious use of an occasional adverb can be helpful because it adds nuance that written dialogue alone may not convey. For example, "'I love you,' he said" is a direct statement of fondness. However, "'I love you,' he said coldly" ''isn't''. The "occasional" and "judicious" parts are heavily stressed, since the authors argue that the overuse of adverbs can be just as distracting as a straight use of Said Bookism.

to:

** However, the authors do concede that the judicious use of an occasional adverb can be helpful because when it adds nuance that written dialogue alone may not convey. For example, They comment that "'I love you,' you, all right' he said" said jokingly" is a direct statement of fondness. However, worlds apart from "'I love you,' you, all right' he said coldly" ''isn't''. The "occasional" and "judicious" parts are heavily stressed, since the authors argue that the overuse of coldly." But adverbs can be just as that add no meaning ("lovingly") or are unusual and distracting as a straight use of Said Bookism.("lambently") are best left off.


* UnspokenPlanGuarantee: Dealt with in "Deja Vu." Specifically, the authors state that any plan should always go wrong if spoken out loud; otherwise, the author has essentially written a spoiler into their own story.

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* UnspokenPlanGuarantee: Dealt with in "Deja Vu." Specifically, the authors state that any plan should always go wrong (or at least have unexpected complications) if spoken out loud; otherwise, the author has essentially written a spoiler into their own story.


* AudienceAlienatingPremise: "Voice in the Wilderness" provides an example, where the story paints a sympathetic picture of an SS officer desperately trying to save the inmates in his concentration camp from disease and starvation (while the Allies have invented the Holocaust as a piece of perfidious propaganda). Whether the author sincerely holds widely-reviled beliefs, or is simply [[{{Troll}} seeking attention]], the book strongly discourages airing such views in public.[[invoked]]

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* AudienceAlienatingPremise: "Voice in the Wilderness" provides an example, where the story paints a sympathetic picture of an SS officer desperately trying to save the inmates in his concentration camp from disease and starvation (while the Allies have invented the Holocaust UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust as a piece of perfidious propaganda). Whether the author sincerely holds widely-reviled beliefs, or is simply [[{{Troll}} seeking attention]], the book strongly discourages airing such views in public.[[invoked]]



** "The Fig Leaf", where the author lovingly describes some vice, but has a viewpoint character pronounce it disgusting, implicitly because the author's trying to distance themselves from their own kink. They discourage it, because no one will be fooled; if you want your work to indulge in some form of smut, you might as well be honest about it.

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** "The Fig Leaf", where the author lovingly describes some vice, but has a viewpoint character pronounce it disgusting, implicitly because the author's trying to distance themselves from their own kink. They discourage it, because no one will be fooled; if you want your work to indulge in some form of smut, you might as well [[AtLeastIAdmitIt be honest about it.it]].


* ShapedLikeItself: ''The Sight Gag'' ([[CaptainObvious In which there is a sight gag.]])

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* ShapedLikeItself: ''The Sight Gag'' ([[CaptainObvious In (In which there is a sight gag.]]))


* SexyDiscretionShot: Discussed in "The Hays Code"; they point out that if the genre you're writing in (such as a steamy 'sexploitation' romance novel, for example) is one where the reader expects to see sexy fun times, then coyly using this trope is a bit of cheat.

to:

* SexyDiscretionShot: Discussed in "The Hays Code"; they point out that if the genre you're writing in (such as a steamy 'sexploitation' romance novel, for example) is one where the reader expects to see sexy fun times, then coyly using this trope is a bit of a cheat.


* TyopOnTheCover: "'Spellcheck' Isn't in My Dictionary" advises fixing all of your typos.


Added DiffLines:

* TyopOnTheCover: "'Spellcheck' Isn't in My Dictionary" advises fixing all of your typos.


* AnachronismStew: "Xeno's iPod" for objects that just "appear", "The Vegan Viking" for anachronistic attitudes and beliefs and "Yo, Charlemagne, how dost thy big war?" for modern-sounding dialogue in a historical setting.
* AnatomicallyImpossibleSex: "The Superhuman Feat" -- ''Wherein a man performs''. It is generally not a good idea to write sex scenes that move out of the domain of physical possibility.

to:

* AnachronismStew: "Xeno's iPod" for objects that just "appear", "The Vegan Viking" for anachronistic attitudes and beliefs beliefs, and "Yo, Charlemagne, how dost thy big war?" for modern-sounding dialogue in a historical setting.
* AnatomicallyImpossibleSex: "The Superhuman Feat" -- ''Wherein a man performs''. It is generally not a good idea to write sex scenes that move out of the domain of physical possibility.



* AngstWhatAngst: "Failing the Turing Test", in which Professor Johnson finds a college student lying naked in his bed instead of his wife... and emotionlessly asks why she's there. She pulls out a gun and says that she's going to kill him...and he simply asks why. When she says that it's because he gave her a bad grade, he says he'd be willing to reconsider if she does him a favor. And ''then'', when she assumes sex is the 'favor' and tries to seduce him, he asks her to be his cat-sitter.[[invoked]]
* AntiClimax: "I'm Melting!" -- ''Wherein the villain conveniently gives up.''

to:

* AngstWhatAngst: "Failing the Turing Test", in which Professor Johnson finds a college student lying naked in his bed instead of his wife... and emotionlessly asks why she's there. She pulls out a gun and says that she's going to kill him... and he simply asks why. When she says that it's because he gave her a bad grade, he says he'd be willing to reconsider if she does him a favor. And ''then'', when she assumes sex is the 'favor' and tries to seduce him, he asks her to be his cat-sitter.[[invoked]]
* AntiClimax: "I'm Melting!" -- ''Wherein the villain conveniently gives up.''



* AuthorFilibuster: "The After-Dinner Sermon," ([[InWhichATropeIsDescribed In which the author wields a mallet]]).

to:

* AuthorFilibuster: "The After-Dinner Sermon," ([[InWhichATropeIsDescribed In Sermon" (''[[InWhichATropeIsDescribed in which the author wields a mallet]]).mallet]]'').



--> Sometimes an unpublished author will stake out a position that is shared by everyone else in the world and defend it as if he stood embattled and alone. As he stridently argues with what he seems to think of as a recalcitrant audience that it is bad to be unkind to animals, the reader balks and eventually rebels. Yes, you have a point -- but why are you shouting at ''us''?

to:

--> Sometimes an unpublished author will stake out a position that is shared by everyone else in the world and defend it as if he stood embattled and alone. As he stridently argues with what he seems to think of as a recalcitrant audience that it is bad to be unkind to animals, the reader balks and eventually rebels. Yes, you have a point -- but why are you shouting at ''us''?



* DescriptionInTheMirror: "What Color Am I?" -- ''Where the character must be in front of a mirror to know what she looks like.'' They discourage it, naturally.

to:

* DescriptionInTheMirror: "What Color Am I?" -- ''Where the character must be in front of a mirror to know what she looks like.'' They discourage it, naturally.



-->This particular blunder is known as ''deus ex machina'', which is French for "Are you fucking kidding me?"
* TheDogWasTheMastermind: A literal example -- the writers observe that unless the protagonist's cat Bartok is the one solving mysteries, Bartok should receive about as many words in the narrative as the couch he is sitting on.

to:

-->This particular blunder is known as ''deus ex machina'', [[PardonMyFrench which is French for "Are for]] "[[YouHaveGotToBeKiddingMe Are you fucking kidding me?"
me?]]"
* TheDogWasTheMastermind: A literal example -- the writers observe that unless the protagonist's cat Bartok is the one solving mysteries, Bartok should receive about as many words in the narrative as the couch he is sitting on.



--> [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Adolf]] [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany introduces Fascism to Germany,]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII spreads war throughout Europe,]] [[UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust murders millions in concentration camps]] -- but he's a strict vegetarian and [[PetTheDog loves his dog]]. Tossing in a touching scene with his German Shepherd Blondie and a dish of lentils won't make Hitler's character "balanced".

to:

--> [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Adolf]] [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany introduces Fascism to Germany,]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII spreads war throughout Europe,]] [[UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust murders millions in concentration camps]] -- but he's a strict vegetarian and [[PetTheDog loves his dog]]. Tossing in a touching scene with his German Shepherd Blondie and a dish of lentils won't make Hitler's character "balanced".



* FauxlosophicNarration: "The Overture" -- ''Wherein the prologue is a brief guide to the meaning of life''. Discouraged.

to:

* FauxlosophicNarration: "The Overture" -- ''Wherein the prologue is a brief guide to the meaning of life''. Discouraged.



* GambitRoulette: "The Riddler" - ''Wherein the nefarious plot is more complex than string theory.'' Naturally, they discourage it, because it will make your story way too hard to follow and make your villain seem [[VillainSue way too competent to be believable]].

to:

* GambitRoulette: "The Riddler" - ''Wherein the nefarious plot is more complex than string theory.'' Naturally, they discourage it, because it will make your story way too hard to follow and make your villain seem [[VillainSue way too competent to be believable]].



* HaveAGayOldTime: Among words you aren't advised to use just for the sake of making the writing fancier (see SesquipedalianLoquaciousness below) is "ejaculated" in its old sense of "exclaimed."

to:

* HaveAGayOldTime: Among words you aren't advised to use just for the sake of making the writing fancier (see SesquipedalianLoquaciousness below) is "ejaculated" in its old sense of "exclaimed.""exclaimed".



* ImprobableAge: Noted under "Magic-onomics", pointing out that it is perfectly fine to explain where a character's wealth comes from by giving them a backstory in which they were a partner in a law firm -- but not if the character is twenty-five.

to:

* ImprobableAge: Noted under "Magic-onomics", pointing out that it is perfectly fine to explain where a character's wealth comes from by giving them a backstory in which they were a partner in a law firm -- but not if the character is twenty-five.



* NoYay: "Last Tango in Santa's Village".[[invoked]] (Yes, it's exactly what it sounds like). If you have a non-sexualized character in your story, for the love of God, give them some sex appeal ''before'' making them hook up with someone. Otherwise your readers will just be bored, confused, and/or disgusted with the relationship.

to:

* NoYay: "Last Tango in Santa's Village".[[invoked]] (Yes, it's exactly what it sounds like). like.) If you have a non-sexualized character in your story, for the love of God, give them some sex appeal ''before'' making them hook up with someone. Otherwise Otherwise, your readers will just be bored, confused, and/or disgusted with the relationship.



* {{Padding}}: "The Second Argument in the Laundromat" (using more than one scene to establish a single fact), "The Redundant Tautology" (the author repeating him or herself) and "The Skipping Record" (a character's thoughts repeating themselves).[[invoked]]
* PetHomosexual: Discouraged in "Priscilla, Queen of the Clichés". Specifically, they note that many amateur writers seem to believe that once they've established that a given character is gay, the stereotypical catty, bitchy dialogue will write itself -- which is, to say the least, rarely the case.

to:

* {{Padding}}: "The Second Argument in the Laundromat" (using more than one scene to establish a single fact), "The Redundant Tautology" (the author repeating him or herself) herself), and "The Skipping Record" (a character's thoughts repeating themselves).[[invoked]]
* PetHomosexual: Discouraged in "Priscilla, Queen of the Clichés". Specifically, they note that many amateur writers seem to believe that once they've established that a given character is gay, the stereotypical catty, bitchy dialogue will write itself -- which is, to say the least, rarely the case.



* PetsHomageName: They discourage using the trope, noting that if your novel's protagonist must have a cat, do not name it after a composer (such as Bartok), after a writer (Hemingway), after an ancient Greek (Socrates) or after a person that reflects the character's political leanings (Trotsky), among several other examples.

to:

* PetsHomageName: They discourage using the trope, noting that if your novel's protagonist must have a cat, do not name it after a composer (such as Bartok), after a writer (Hemingway), after an ancient Greek (Socrates) (Socrates), or after a person that reflects the character's political leanings (Trotsky), among several other examples.



* PuritySue: "Too Good to Be True"- ''Wherein an attempt to make TheProtagonist sympathetic overshoots the mark.''[[invoked]]
* PurpleProse: "The Puffer Fish", "Mouth-Watering World-Class Prose," which reads like advertisements or blurbs, "Gibberish for Art's sake," which purposely tries to sound like the classic authors did. It also gives an example of "The Purple Blue Prose", which is a sexual version. And "The Crepitating Parasol," in which that [[Film/ThisIsSpinalTap fundamental line between "clever" and "stupid"]] is crossed due to [[ViewersAreGeniuses suffocating the prose with obscure references and jokes]].
* RandomEventsPlot: Implicitly discouraged - for the section dealing with "Plot", the subtitle is "Not just a bunch of stuff that happens".

to:

* PuritySue: "Too Good to Be True"- True" ''Wherein an attempt to make TheProtagonist sympathetic overshoots the mark.''[[invoked]]
* PurpleProse: "The Puffer Fish", "Mouth-Watering World-Class Prose," Prose", which reads like advertisements or blurbs, "Gibberish for Art's sake," sake", which purposely tries to sound like the classic authors did. It also gives an example of "The Purple Blue Prose", which is a sexual version. And "The Crepitating Parasol," in which that [[Film/ThisIsSpinalTap fundamental line between "clever" and "stupid"]] is crossed due to [[ViewersAreGeniuses suffocating the prose with obscure references and jokes]].
* RandomEventsPlot: Implicitly discouraged - for the section dealing with "Plot", the subtitle is "Not just a bunch of stuff that happens".



** "Asseverated the Man" highlights the unusual tendency for beginning writers to avoid using the unadorned word "said". Experienced authors know that it is in fact an "invisible word" like "the", "a" or "it". Using flowery synonyms as speech indicators or using too many adverbs will only draw attention to the writing and break the reader's immersion in the story.

to:

** "Asseverated the Man" highlights the unusual tendency for beginning writers to avoid using the unadorned word "said". Experienced authors know that it is in fact an "invisible word" like "the", "a" "a", or "it". Using flowery synonyms as speech indicators or using too many adverbs will only draw attention to the writing and break the reader's immersion in the story.



* SexyDiscretionShot: Discussed in "The Hays Code"; they point out that if the genre you're writing in (such as a steamy 'sexploitation' romance novel, for example) is one where the reader expects to see sexy fun times then coyly using this trope is a bit of cheat.

to:

* SexyDiscretionShot: Discussed in "The Hays Code"; they point out that if the genre you're writing in (such as a steamy 'sexploitation' romance novel, for example) is one where the reader expects to see sexy fun times times, then coyly using this trope is a bit of cheat.



* SlowPacedBeginning: "The Waiting Room" advises that exposition and background should wait until the actual plot is kicked off, lest readers lose interest. It also advises that InMediasRes can be used to provided chunks of exposition without delaying the plot. [[invoked]]

to:

* SlowPacedBeginning: "The Waiting Room" advises that exposition and background should wait until the actual plot is kicked off, lest readers lose interest. It also advises that InMediasRes can be used to provided provide chunks of exposition without delaying the plot. [[invoked]]



* StylisticSuck: The examples, which are claimed to be submissions from beginning authors, but actually {{Deliberately Bad Example}}s that show off the misuse of the tropes they discuss.

to:

* StylisticSuck: The examples, which are claimed to be submissions from beginning authors, but are actually {{Deliberately Bad Example}}s that show off the misuse of the tropes they discuss.



* SwitchingPOV: "Grabbing the Mike: Wherein the point of view momentarily strays", "The Tennis Match: Wherein the point of view bounces back and forth", "The Democracy: Where everyone is heard from" and "The Service Interruption: Wherein the point of view suffers a temporary blackout" are examples of how not to do this (in a word, "inconsistently"). They also recommend against writing from the perspective of a background character who only exists so that they can witness some key event (unless the novel already has numerous points of view).
* TakeOurWordForIt: Heavily discouraged in "Words Fail Me" (''where the author stops short of communication.'') since it defeats the purpose of literature.
* TerribleIntervieweesMontage: Discouraged in the Second Argument At The Laundromat, stating that while this works well on film where three scenes pass in 30 seconds, it becomes a repetitive drag on paper.

to:

* SwitchingPOV: "Grabbing the Mike: Wherein the point of view momentarily strays", "The Tennis Match: Wherein the point of view bounces back and forth", "The Democracy: Where everyone is heard from" from", and "The Service Interruption: Wherein the point of view suffers a temporary blackout" are examples of how not to do this (in a word, "inconsistently"). They also recommend against writing from the perspective of a background character who only exists so that they can witness some key event (unless the novel already has numerous points of view).
* TakeOurWordForIt: Heavily discouraged in "Words Fail Me" (''where the author stops short of communication.'') communication''), since it defeats the purpose of literature.
* TerribleIntervieweesMontage: Discouraged in the "the Second Argument At The Laundromat, Laundromat", stating that while this works well on film where three scenes pass in 30 seconds, it becomes a repetitive drag on paper.



-->''Nobody can fail to notice that for every "rule" of writing these books present, novels can be found in which it has been broken with great success... We do not propose any rules; we offer observations. "No right on red" is a rule. "Driving at high speed toward a brick wall usually ends badly" is an observation.''

to:

-->''Nobody can fail to notice that for every "rule" of writing these books present, novels can be found in which it has been broken with great success... We do not propose any rules; we offer observations. "No right on red" is a rule. "Driving "[[TooDumbToLive Driving at high speed toward a brick wall wall]] usually ends badly" is an observation.''



* UnconventionalFormatting: Not only do they advise against abnormal formatting in the writing in "Hello! I Am the Author" but they break convention with providing a proper format for submitting to publishers.

to:

* UnconventionalFormatting: Not only do they advise against abnormal formatting in the writing in "Hello! I Am the Author" Author", but they break convention with providing a proper format for submitting to publishers.



* WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma[=/=]BoldInflation: "I Mean This!! It's Important!!"- "While commas, often appear, randomly in unpublished manuscripts--and there is an epidemic--of unnecessary--em-dashes, it is the exclamation mark which takes the most punishment." It also talks about [[CapitalLettersAreMagic Capitalizing Words The Author Thinks Are Important]], and compares it to Ironic Capitalization, a combination of which is Repeatedly Used On This Very Wiki.

to:

* WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma[=/=]BoldInflation: "I Mean This!! It's Important!!"- Important!!" "While commas, often appear, randomly in unpublished manuscripts--and manuscripts - and there is an epidemic--of unnecessary--em-dashes, epidemic - of unnecessary em-dashes, it is the exclamation mark which takes the most punishment." It also talks about [[CapitalLettersAreMagic Capitalizing Words The Author Thinks Are Important]], and compares it to Ironic Capitalization, a combination of which is Repeatedly Used On This Very Wiki.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: "Oh, Don't Mind Him" - Where a character's personal problems (in the example the protagonist's brother, an alcoholic war veteran who seems to exist only to provide the protagonist with an inspirational conversation before he goes to Yale) remain unexplored. "The Gum on the Mantlepiece" is similar, a kind of unintentional RedHerring.

to:

* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: "Oh, Don't Mind Him" - Where a character's personal problems (in the example the protagonist's brother, an alcoholic war veteran who seems to exist only to provide the protagonist with an inspirational conversation before he goes to Yale) remain unexplored. "The Gum on the Mantlepiece" is similar, a kind of unintentional RedHerring.



* YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe: "Yo, Charlemagne, How Dost Thy Big War?" Discouraged for much of the same reasons as "The Crepitating Parasol;" it's all too easy to get incorrect, and it will break the immersion of your story.

to:

* YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe: "Yo, Charlemagne, How Dost Thy Big War?" Discouraged for much of the same reasons as "The Crepitating Parasol;" Parasol"; it's all too easy to get incorrect, and it will break the immersion of your story.






** "Ask yourself: 'do I know [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness this word?']] If the answer is no, then you do not know it."

to:

** "Ask yourself: 'do I know [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness this word?']] word?]]' If the answer is no, then you do not know it."

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