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History Literature / FugueForADarkeningIsland

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fugue_for_a_darkening_island.png]]



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* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: in the 1972 edition at least.

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* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: in the 1972 edition at least.least.
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* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: A very [[UnfortunateImplications unfortunate]] version (in the 1972 edition at least).

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* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: A very [[UnfortunateImplications unfortunate]] version (in in the 1972 edition at least).least.


A 1972 novel written by Christopher Priest (the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Priest_%28novelist%29 British science fiction writer]], not the [[ChristopherPriest American comic book writer]]. A revised edition was published in 2011.

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A 1972 novel written by Christopher Priest (the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Priest_%28novelist%29 British science fiction writer]], not the [[ChristopherPriest American comic book writer]].Creator/{{Christopher Priest|Novelist}}. A revised edition was published in 2011.


* CozyCatastrophe: Averted hard. Britain ravaged by civil war does not look like a nice place at all.

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* CozyCatastrophe: Averted hard.Averted. Britain ravaged by civil war does not look like a nice place at all.


* TheStoic: Whitman, to an almost [[TheStranger Meursault]]-like level. [[NotSoStoic Broken]] (slightly) when [[spoiler: he learns the fate of his wife and daughter]].

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* TheStoic: Whitman, to an almost [[TheStranger [[Literature/TheStranger Meursault]]-like level. [[NotSoStoic Broken]] (slightly) when [[spoiler: he learns the fate of his wife and daughter]].


* FairForItsDay: When it was published, some left-leaning critics praised it as a blistering critique of racism. Some years later it was lambasted for being racist itself. These criticisms were apparently part of the motivation for the revised edition.


A 1972 novel written by ChristopherPriest. A revised edition was published in 2011.

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A 1972 novel written by ChristopherPriest.Christopher Priest (the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Priest_%28novelist%29 British science fiction writer]], not the [[ChristopherPriest American comic book writer]]. A revised edition was published in 2011.

Added DiffLines:

* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: Prime Minister Tregarth seems to have been modelled after Enoch Powell.


* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: A very [[UnfortunateImplications unfortunate]] version.

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* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: A very [[UnfortunateImplications unfortunate]] version.version (in the 1972 edition at least).

Added DiffLines:

A 1972 novel written by ChristopherPriest. A revised edition was published in 2011.

A nuclear exchange occurs between several African countries. As a result, much of the continent is rendered uninhabitable, and vast numbers of refugees are forced to flee. Around two million of them end up in the UK, which by an unfortunate twist of fate has just elected a xenophobic right wing government led by John Tregarth. The result is a civil war between the government, a more liberal faction who support integrating the refugees, and the refugees themselves. The story is told from the point of view of Alan Whitman, a former university lecturer who is forced to flee his home with his wife and daughter after his neighbourhood is forcibly displaced by Africans.
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!!Tropes featured in this work include:

* BeigeProse: Whitman's detached tone leads to this.
* CozyCatastrophe: Averted hard. Britain ravaged by civil war does not look like a nice place at all.
* FairForItsDay: When it was published, some left-leaning critics praised it as a blistering critique of racism. Some years later it was lambasted for being racist itself. These criticisms were apparently part of the motivation for the revised edition.
* FutureSlang: The African refugees are called "Afrims" for reasons that aren't made clear in the book.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: [[spoiler: Whitman appears to be preparing for this at the end]].
* ScaryBlackMan: The Afrims come across this way.
* TheStoic: Whitman, to an almost [[TheStranger Meursault]]-like level. [[NotSoStoic Broken]] (slightly) when [[spoiler: he learns the fate of his wife and daughter]].
* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: A very [[UnfortunateImplications unfortunate]] version.

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