Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Literature / FinnegansWake

Go To



It ''really'' helps to hear it being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HgCjtd2iPU read aloud]].

to:

It ''really'' helps to hear it being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HgCjtd2iPU read aloud]].


It helps to hear it being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HgCjtd2iPU read aloud]].

to:

It ''really'' helps to hear it being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HgCjtd2iPU read aloud]].



to:

It helps to hear it being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HgCjtd2iPU read aloud]].


''Finnegans Wake''[[note]]The lack of apostrophe is deliberate. If you want rigidly accurate grammar and spelling, this is definitely not the book for you.[[/note]] is a 1939 novel written by Creator/JamesJoyce. It took him 17 years to write, and may take nearly as long to read. The novel is written in English but an idiosyncratic version of the language specifically created for this book. It is an English adapted and inflected with several multilingual and multilayered puns in the style of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Jabberwocky'' albeit at a far bigger scale. It contains elements, usually obscure puns, from over 60 world languages. The title is a reference to a 1850s Irish ballad called "Finnegan's Wake"[[note]]It has the apostrophe as you may notice[[/note]], a drinking song that tells the story of a man resurrected at his funeral when whiskey is spilled on his corpse.

to:

''Finnegans Wake''[[note]]The lack of apostrophe is deliberate. If you want rigidly accurate grammar and spelling, this is definitely not the book for you.[[/note]] is a 1939 novel written by Creator/JamesJoyce. It took him 17 years to write, and may take nearly as long to read. The novel is written in English but an idiosyncratic version of the language specifically created for this book. It is an English adapted and inflected with several multilingual and multilayered puns in the style of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Jabberwocky'' albeit at on a far bigger scale. It contains elements, usually obscure puns, from over 60 world languages. The title is a reference to a 1850s Irish ballad called "Finnegan's Wake"[[note]]It has the apostrophe as you may notice[[/note]], a drinking song that tells the story of a man resurrected at his funeral when whiskey is spilled on his corpse.


* AllJustADream: A common EpilepticTree, possibly supported by WordOfGod. Not to mention the word "wake" can mean either a funeral ceremony or waking up.

to:

* AllJustADream: A common EpilepticTree, possibly supported by WordOfGod. Not to mention the word "wake" can mean either a funeral ceremony or waking up. Although part of the point of the book is that dreams aren't "just" dreams.


* GenreBusting: To the point where Wiki/TheOtherWiki, which is usually very good at finagling a book into a particular genre, simply gives its genre as ''sui generis''.[[note]]That's "one of a kind" for those unfamiliar with the expression.[[/note]] Of course, the first sentence of the article identifies it as "a work of [[SurrealHumor comic fiction]]" as well.

to:

* GenreBusting: To the point where Wiki/TheOtherWiki, which is usually very good at finagling a book into a particular genre, simply gives its genre as ''sui generis''.[[note]]That's "one of a kind" for those unfamiliar with the expression.[[/note]] Of course, the first sentence of the article identifies it as "a work of [[SurrealHumor comic fiction]]" as well.[[/note]]


* AllJustADream: A common EpilepticTree, possibly supported by WordOfGod. Not to mention the word "wake" can mean either a funeral ceremony or [[CaptainObvious waking up]].

to:

* AllJustADream: A common EpilepticTree, possibly supported by WordOfGod. Not to mention the word "wake" can mean either a funeral ceremony or [[CaptainObvious waking up]].up.


* TyopOnTheCover: The lack of an apostrophe is deliberate.

to:

* TyopOnTheCover: InheritedIlliteracyTitle: The lack of an apostrophe is deliberate.

Added DiffLines:

* TyopOnTheCover: The lack of an apostrophe is deliberate.


--> ''[[Literature/VanityFair Vanity flee and Verity fear]]! Diobell! Whalebones and buskbutts may hurt you (thwackaway thwuck!) but never lay bare your breast secret (dickette's place!) to joy a Jonas in the Dolphin's Barncar with [[Literature/OurMutualFriend your meetual fan]], [[Literature/DavidCopperfield Doveyed Covetfilles]], comepulsing payn-attention spasms between the averthisment for Ulikah's wine and a pair of pulldoors of the old cupiosity shape.''

to:

--> ''[[Literature/VanityFair --->''[[Literature/VanityFair Vanity flee and Verity fear]]! Diobell! Whalebones and buskbutts may hurt you (thwackaway thwuck!) but never lay bare your breast secret (dickette's place!) to joy a Jonas in the Dolphin's Barncar with [[Literature/OurMutualFriend your meetual fan]], [[Literature/DavidCopperfield Doveyed Covetfilles]], comepulsing payn-attention spasms between the averthisment for Ulikah's wine and a pair of pulldoors of the old cupiosity shape.''



* ResetButton: If you notice the [[spoiler: ''first'' sentence of the novel and compare it to the ''last,'' you can see that the last one can continue the first sentence, this starting the cycle once again.]]

to:

* ResetButton: If you notice the [[spoiler: ''first'' [[spoiler:''first'' sentence of the novel and compare it to the ''last,'' you can see that the last one can continue the first sentence, this starting the cycle once again.]]


-->-- TheOtherWiki on ''Finnegans Wake''

to:

-->-- TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki on ''Finnegans Wake''


* GenreBusting: To the point where TheOtherWiki, which is usually very good at finagling a book into a particular genre, simply gives its genre as ''sui generis''.[[note]]That's "one of a kind" for those unfamiliar with the expression.[[/note]] Of course, the first sentence of the article identifies it as "a work of [[SurrealHumor comic fiction]]" as well.

to:

* GenreBusting: To the point where TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, which is usually very good at finagling a book into a particular genre, simply gives its genre as ''sui generis''.[[note]]That's "one of a kind" for those unfamiliar with the expression.[[/note]] Of course, the first sentence of the article identifies it as "a work of [[SurrealHumor comic fiction]]" as well.


* CallBack: In the penultimate chapter, ALP comforts Shaun after he has a nightmare about "phanthares in the room", mirroring Haines' nightmares about a panther in {{Ulysses}}. The book is also full of hidden references to Bloom and Stephen's experiences in the earlier books, and even several passages fully rewritten in "Wakese".

to:

* CallBack: In the penultimate chapter, ALP comforts Shaun after he has a nightmare about "phanthares in the room", mirroring Haines' nightmares about a panther in {{Ulysses}}.Literature/{{Ulysses}}. The book is also full of hidden references to Bloom and Stephen's experiences in the earlier books, and even several passages fully rewritten in "Wakese".


** For one thing the opening sentence, rather than the odd non-sequitir that it seems on surface, is actually an accurate reflection of Dublin's topography: the river Liffey runs past the Adam and Eve Church before swerving past Vico Road upon which one can find Howth Castle and its surroundings. Many other scenes refer to actual locations in Dublin, such as a monument to the Duke of Wellington, the actual Phoenix Park and the many other locations referred to there.

to:

** For one thing the opening sentence, rather than the odd non-sequitir non-sequitur that it seems on its surface, is actually an accurate reflection of Dublin's topography: describes the river Liffey runs past general layout of Dublin Bay: the Franciscan Friary, a.k.a. Adam and Eve Church before swerving past Vico Road upon which one can find Eve's Church, is indeed on the River Liffey, and the bay itself is marked on its northern end by Howth Castle and on its surroundings.southern end by the Vico Road, which starts at the very southernmost promontory of Dublin Bay and goes south from there. Many other scenes refer to actual locations in Dublin, such as a monument to the Duke of Wellington, the actual Phoenix Park and the many other locations referred to there.


''Finnegans Wake''[[note]]The lack of apostophe is deliberate. If you want rigidly accurate grammar and spelling, this is definitely not the book for you.[[/note]] is a 1939 novel written by Creator/JamesJoyce. It took him 17 years to write, and may take nearly as long to read. The novel is written in English but an idiosyncratic version of the language specifically created for this book. It is an English adapted and inflected with several multilingual and multilayered puns in the style of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Jabberwocky'' albeit at a far bigger scale. It contains elements, usually obscure puns, from over 60 world languages. The title is a reference to a 1850s Irish ballad called "Finnegan's Wake"[[note]]It has the apostrophe as you may notice[[/note]], a drinking song that tells the story of a man resurrected at his funeral when whiskey is spilled on his corpse.

to:

''Finnegans Wake''[[note]]The lack of apostophe apostrophe is deliberate. If you want rigidly accurate grammar and spelling, this is definitely not the book for you.[[/note]] is a 1939 novel written by Creator/JamesJoyce. It took him 17 years to write, and may take nearly as long to read. The novel is written in English but an idiosyncratic version of the language specifically created for this book. It is an English adapted and inflected with several multilingual and multilayered puns in the style of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Jabberwocky'' albeit at a far bigger scale. It contains elements, usually obscure puns, from over 60 world languages. The title is a reference to a 1850s Irish ballad called "Finnegan's Wake"[[note]]It has the apostrophe as you may notice[[/note]], a drinking song that tells the story of a man resurrected at his funeral when whiskey is spilled on his corpse.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 86

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report