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** One half of the BigBadDuumvirate for ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'', [[spoiler:Wolfgang von Uberwald]], is a FauxAffablyEvil sadist and "pureblood" werewolf, who killed his own younger sister for being stuck in human form permanently and helped engineer the conspiracy to kickstart a war between dwarf and troll. Unlike his more sympathetic -- if tragically misguided -- co-conspirator, his reasons for this are [[ForTheEvulz purely for his own amusement]].

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** One half of the BigBadDuumvirate for ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'', [[spoiler:Wolfgang von Uberwald]], is a FauxAffablyEvil sadist and "pureblood" werewolf, who killed his own younger sister for being stuck in human form permanently permanently, forced his younger brother to flee for fear for further familicide, and helped engineer the conspiracy to kickstart a war between dwarf and troll. Unlike his more sympathetic -- if tragically misguided -- co-conspirator, his reasons for this are [[ForTheEvulz purely for his own amusement]]. In the PostClimaxConfrontation, he ends up fatally injuring some innocent bystanders and a horse purely because they got in his way.


* TheKingslayer: "Old Stoneface" Vimes, ancestor of the current Vimes, chopped the King's head after he was sentenced to death by a tribunal for his [[PaedoHunt horrific]] [[ColdBloodedTorture crimes]]. He was the only one with the balls to do it. He was later executed, his body getting the [[AnArmAndALeg Osiris treatment]]. His [[NeverLiveItDown bad reputation]] was so ''powerful'', his descendants ''many generations later'' are still being bugged about it.

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* TheKingslayer: "Old Stoneface" Vimes, ancestor of the current Vimes, chopped the King's head after he was sentenced to death by a tribunal for his [[PaedoHunt horrific]] [[ColdBloodedTorture crimes]]. He was the only one with the balls to do it. He was later executed, his body getting the [[AnArmAndALeg Osiris treatment]]. His [[NeverLiveItDown [[OnceDoneNeverForgotten bad reputation]] was so ''powerful'', his descendants ''many generations later'' are still being bugged about it.


!!The main Discworld novels, in order of release. Brackets denote date of UK publication and main character(s) - standalone indicates that it is not part of a series. [[note]] Some sources (including the back covers of the Collector's Library editions) group the standalones based on concepts rather than characters, so ''Pyramids'' and ''Small Gods'' are the "Gods" or "Ancient Civilisations" series, while ''Moving Pictures'', ''The Truth'' and ''Monstrous Regiment'' join the Moist books as the "Industrial Revolution" series.[[/note]]

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!!The main Discworld novels, in order of release. Brackets denote date of UK publication and main character(s) - -- standalone indicates that it is not part of a series. [[note]] Some sources (including the back covers of the Collector's Library editions) group the standalones based on concepts rather than characters, so ''Pyramids'' and ''Small Gods'' are the "Gods" or "Ancient Civilisations" series, while ''Moving Pictures'', ''The Truth'' and ''Monstrous Regiment'' join the Moist books as the "Industrial Revolution" series.[[/note]]



* ''Literature/TheColourOfMagic'' (1983 - Rincewind the wizard)
* ''Literature/TheLightFantastic'' (1986 - Rincewind)
* ''Literature/EqualRites'' (1987 - Granny Weatherwax the witch)
* ''Literature/{{Mort}}'' (1987 - Death)
* ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'' (1988 - Rincewind)
* ''Literature/WyrdSisters'' (1988 - The Lancre witches, inc. Granny Weatherwax)
* ''Literature/{{Pyramids}}'' (1989 - standalone)
* ''Literature/GuardsGuards'' (1989 - The City Watch)
* ''Literature/{{Eric}}'' (1990 - Rincewind; originally published as an illustrated novel)
* ''Literature/MovingPictures'' (1990- standalone, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/ReaperMan'' (1991 - Death, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/WitchesAbroad'' (1991 - The Lancre witches)
* ''Literature/SmallGods'' (1992 - standalone, History Monks cameo)
* ''Literature/LordsAndLadies'' (1992 - The Lancre witches, Wizards cameo)
* ''Literature/MenAtArms'' (1993 - The City Watch)
* ''Literature/SoulMusic'' (1994 - Death, Susan, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/InterestingTimes'' (1994 - Rincewind, Heroes)
* ''Literature/{{Maskerade}}'' (1995 - The Lancre witches)
* ''Literature/FeetOfClay'' (1996 - The City Watch)
* ''Literature/{{Hogfather}}'' (1996 - Death, Susan, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/{{Jingo}}'' (1997 - The City Watch)
* ''Literature/TheLastContinent'' (1998 - Rincewind/Wizards)
* ''Literature/CarpeJugulum'' (1998- The Lancre witches, Uberwald)
* ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'' (1999 - The City Watch, Uberwald)
* ''Literature/TheTruth'' (2000 - standalone, The City Watch cameo)
* ''Literature/ThiefOfTime'' (2001 - History Monks, Death, Susan)
* ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' (2002 - History Monks, The City Watch)
* ''Literature/MonstrousRegiment'' (2003 - standalone/The City Watch cameo, Uberwald)
* ''Literature/GoingPostal'' (2004 - Moist von Lipwig)
* ''Literature/{{Thud}}'' (2005 - The City Watch)
* ''Literature/MakingMoney'' (2007 - Moist von Lipwig)
* ''Literature/UnseenAcademicals'' (2009 - Wizards and new characters)
* ''Literature/{{Snuff}}'' (2011 - The City Watch)
* ''Literature/RaisingSteam'' (2013 - Moist von Lipwig, The City Watch cameo)

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* ''Literature/TheColourOfMagic'' (1983 - -- Rincewind the wizard)
* ''Literature/TheLightFantastic'' (1986 - -- Rincewind)
* ''Literature/EqualRites'' (1987 - -- Granny Weatherwax the witch)
* ''Literature/{{Mort}}'' (1987 - -- Death)
* ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'' (1988 - -- Rincewind)
* ''Literature/WyrdSisters'' (1988 - -- The Lancre witches, inc. Granny Weatherwax)
* ''Literature/{{Pyramids}}'' (1989 - -- standalone)
* ''Literature/GuardsGuards'' (1989 - -- The City Watch)
* ''Literature/{{Eric}}'' (1990 - -- Rincewind; originally published as an illustrated novel)
* ''Literature/MovingPictures'' (1990- (1990 -- standalone, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/ReaperMan'' (1991 - -- Death, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/WitchesAbroad'' (1991 - -- The Lancre witches)
* ''Literature/SmallGods'' (1992 - -- standalone, History Monks cameo)
* ''Literature/LordsAndLadies'' (1992 - -- The Lancre witches, Wizards cameo)
* ''Literature/MenAtArms'' (1993 - -- The City Watch)
* ''Literature/SoulMusic'' (1994 - -- Death, Susan, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/InterestingTimes'' (1994 - -- Rincewind, Heroes)
* ''Literature/{{Maskerade}}'' (1995 - -- The Lancre witches)
* ''Literature/FeetOfClay'' (1996 - -- The City Watch)
* ''Literature/{{Hogfather}}'' (1996 - -- Death, Susan, Wizards subplot)
* ''Literature/{{Jingo}}'' (1997 - -- The City Watch)
* ''Literature/TheLastContinent'' (1998 - -- Rincewind/Wizards)
* ''Literature/CarpeJugulum'' (1998- (1998 -- The Lancre witches, Uberwald)
* ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'' (1999 - -- The City Watch, Uberwald)
* ''Literature/TheTruth'' (2000 - -- standalone, The City Watch cameo)
* ''Literature/ThiefOfTime'' (2001 - -- History Monks, Death, Susan)
* ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' (2002 - -- History Monks, The City Watch)
* ''Literature/MonstrousRegiment'' (2003 - -- standalone/The City Watch cameo, Uberwald)
* ''Literature/GoingPostal'' (2004 - -- Moist von Lipwig)
* ''Literature/{{Thud}}'' (2005 - -- The City Watch)
* ''Literature/MakingMoney'' (2007 - -- Moist von Lipwig)
* ''Literature/UnseenAcademicals'' (2009 - -- Wizards and new characters)
* ''Literature/{{Snuff}}'' (2011 - -- The City Watch)
* ''Literature/RaisingSteam'' (2013 - -- Moist von Lipwig, The City Watch cameo)



* ''Literature/{{Eric}}'' (illustrated by Josh Kirby) (1990 - Rincewind; also available in paperback novel format)
* ''Literature/TheLastHero'' (illustrated by Paul Kidby) (2001 - Rincewind, bits of The City Watch and Wizards, Heroes; republished with more illustrations)

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* ''Literature/{{Eric}}'' (illustrated by Josh Kirby) (1990 - -- Rincewind; also available in paperback novel format)
* ''Literature/TheLastHero'' (illustrated by Paul Kidby) (2001 - -- Rincewind, bits of The City Watch and Wizards, Heroes; republished with more illustrations)



* ''Literature/TheAmazingMauriceAndHisEducatedRodents'' (2001 - standalone)
* ''Literature/TheWeeFreeMen'' (2003 - Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/AHatFullOfSky'' (2004 - Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/{{Wintersmith}}'' (2006 - Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/IShallWearMidnight'' (2010 - Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/TheShepherdsCrown'' (2015 - published posthumously in August 2015 - Tiffany Aching)

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* ''Literature/TheAmazingMauriceAndHisEducatedRodents'' (2001 - -- standalone)
* ''Literature/TheWeeFreeMen'' (2003 - -- Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/AHatFullOfSky'' (2004 - -- Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/{{Wintersmith}}'' (2006 - -- Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/IShallWearMidnight'' (2010 - -- Tiffany Aching)
* ''Literature/TheShepherdsCrown'' (2015 - -- published posthumously in August 2015 - -- Tiffany Aching)



* ''Literature/WheresMyCow'' (illustrated by Mervyn Grant) (2005 - The City Watch; tie-in with ''Literature/{{Thud}}'')
* ''Literature/TheWorldOfPoo'' (illustrated by Peter Dennis) (2012 - tie in with ''Literature/{{Snuff}}'')

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* ''Literature/WheresMyCow'' (illustrated by Mervyn Grant) (2005 - -- The City Watch; tie-in with ''Literature/{{Thud}}'')
* ''Literature/TheWorldOfPoo'' (illustrated by Peter Dennis) (2012 - -- tie in with ''Literature/{{Snuff}}'')



* "Troll Bridge" (standalone - Cohen)

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* "Troll Bridge" (standalone - -- Cohen)



* ''Scouting For Trolls'' was mentioned by Sir Terry in an interview as a possible future book. Some background material has emerged - scouting is extant in Ankh-Morpork according to one of the squibs in the '' A Blink of the Screen'' collection and a scene where Carrot is running a scout troop comprising two rival gangs appears in ''Jingo''. A minor character in ''Raising Steam'' is mentioned to be a scout.
* ''Raising Taxes'' - at the end of ''Making Money'' Vetinari and Drumknott have a brief conversation about the need for reform of Ankh-Morpork's archaic tax system and Moist von Lipwig is mooted as a possible architect. The title was mentioned by Sir Terry during promotional tours for ''Making Money'' but the book appears to have been radically reworked into ''Raising Steam'' instead.
* ''Running Water'' - mentioned once by Terry at a book festival as a potential book featuring Moist von Lipwig getting into either the logging industry, the canal industry or the piped water supply industry depending on which rumour is correct.

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* ''Scouting For Trolls'' was mentioned by Sir Terry in an interview as a possible future book. Some background material has emerged - -- scouting is extant in Ankh-Morpork according to one of the squibs in the '' A Blink of the Screen'' collection and a scene where Carrot is running a scout troop comprising two rival gangs appears in ''Jingo''. A minor character in ''Raising Steam'' is mentioned to be a scout.
* ''Raising Taxes'' - -- at the end of ''Making Money'' Vetinari and Drumknott have a brief conversation about the need for reform of Ankh-Morpork's archaic tax system and Moist von Lipwig is mooted as a possible architect. The title was mentioned by Sir Terry during promotional tours for ''Making Money'' but the book appears to have been radically reworked into ''Raising Steam'' instead.
* ''Running Water'' - -- mentioned once by Terry at a book festival as a potential book featuring Moist von Lipwig getting into either the logging industry, the canal industry or the piped water supply industry depending on which rumour is correct.



** ''Twilight Canyons'' - a group of elderly people solve a missing treasure mystery and foil the rise of a dark lord despite failing memories.
** ''The Dark Incontinent'' - presumably would have done for Africa what ''The Last Continent'' did for Australia with carnivorous plants and a crystal cave. At the last Discworld Convention he attended, Terry commented that he'd worked out how to do it without being offensive or patronising and it would involve parody "but probably not in the way you expect".

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** ''Twilight Canyons'' - -- a group of elderly people solve a missing treasure mystery and foil the rise of a dark lord despite failing memories.
** ''The Dark Incontinent'' - -- presumably would have done for Africa what ''The Last Continent'' did for Australia with carnivorous plants and a crystal cave. At the last Discworld Convention he attended, Terry commented that he'd worked out how to do it without being offensive or patronising and it would involve parody "but probably not in the way you expect".



** Death's scythe and sword. Especially Death's scythe, which is described as "proverbially sharp" and can [[PaintingTheMedium cut the dialog]] ''in the book'' when it's swung. It exudes an aura of sharpness that extends several inches from the actual blade - ''because it is that sharp.''

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** Death's scythe and sword. Especially Death's scythe, which is described as "proverbially sharp" and can [[PaintingTheMedium cut the dialog]] ''in the book'' when it's swung. It exudes an aura of sharpness that extends several inches from the actual blade - -- ''because it is that sharp.''



** The Mended Drum (originally the Broken Drum - "you can't beat it"). Originally a seedy bar in the mould of the Wild West, and as such a favoured haunt of the Disc's many Heroes. In today's more congenial age, barfights at the Mended Drum are staged contests and severed limbs are carefully numbered so they can be surgically reattached.

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** The Mended Drum (originally the Broken Drum - -- "you can't beat it"). Originally a seedy bar in the mould of the Wild West, and as such a favoured haunt of the Disc's many Heroes. In today's more congenial age, barfights at the Mended Drum are staged contests and severed limbs are carefully numbered so they can be surgically reattached.



* BeardedBaby: In canonical artwork, all [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Dwarves]] are depicted as having beards - even babies in arms. Dwarfs on the Discworld, like their mothers and fathers, are born with beards. [[https://i.imgur.com/TY3voGX.png See here]]

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* BeardedBaby: In canonical artwork, all [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Dwarves]] are depicted as having beards - -- even babies in arms. Dwarfs on the Discworld, like their mothers and fathers, are born with beards. [[https://i.imgur.com/TY3voGX.png See here]]



* DoubleEntendre: The novels make fairly heavy usage of innuendo and oblique references to disguise more adult subjects, either for humor (drinking songs like "A Wizard's Staff Has A Knob On The End" and "The Hedgehog Song"[[note]]At least the canon verses, all of which are cut off before any explicit lyrics[[/note]]) or for delicacy (King Lorenzo the Kind is only described as being "very fond of children" in the series itself - this is plainly doubletalk for "sadistic pedophile").

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* DoubleEntendre: The novels make fairly heavy usage of innuendo and oblique references to disguise more adult subjects, either for humor (drinking songs like "A Wizard's Staff Has A a Knob On The on the End" and "The Hedgehog Song"[[note]]At least the canon verses, all of which are cut off before any explicit lyrics[[/note]]) or for delicacy (King Lorenzo the Kind is only described as being "very fond of children" in the series itself - -- this is plainly doubletalk for "sadistic pedophile").



** The dwarves have elements of Jewish culture (JewishMother in particular), Scandinavians (see especially their names), and - obviously - the dwarves from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', a line from which was the direct inspiration for their complete lack of sexual dimorphism throughout most of the books. There is also a (small) faction of dwarven supremacists (e.g., ''Literature/{{Thud}}''[='=]s Hamcrusher) who can be seen as having {{applicability}} to a large number of real-world conflicts that, due to the Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, are probably best not mentioned here by name.

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** The dwarves have elements of Jewish culture (JewishMother in particular), Scandinavians (see especially their names), and - -- obviously - -- the dwarves from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', a line from which was the direct inspiration for their complete lack of sexual dimorphism throughout most of the books. There is also a (small) faction of dwarven supremacists (e.g., ''Literature/{{Thud}}''[='=]s Hamcrusher) who can be seen as having {{applicability}} to a large number of real-world conflicts that, due to the Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, are probably best not mentioned here by name.



* GemTissue: The Diamond King of the Trolls isn't just a flowery regal title. He really is made of diamond. Trolls are made of what is called ''metamorphorical rock'', where the silicon-based substance of their bodies is predominantly one form of inorganic silicon tissue: the stuff of their being is partly down to genetic factors, but can also be mimetic of the dominant rock of their surroundings. Many male trolls are simply "Granite" or "Marble" or similar: but female trolls tend to incorporate a lot more wholly and semi-precious gemstones, ie Ruby, Beryl, et c. And, of course, ''all'' trolls have diamond teeth - the only material strong enough to grind and break down rock.

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* GemTissue: The Diamond King of the Trolls isn't just a flowery regal title. He really is made of diamond. Trolls are made of what is called ''metamorphorical rock'', where the silicon-based substance of their bodies is predominantly one form of inorganic silicon tissue: the stuff of their being is partly down to genetic factors, but can also be mimetic of the dominant rock of their surroundings. Many male trolls are simply "Granite" or "Marble" or similar: but female trolls tend to incorporate a lot more wholly and semi-precious gemstones, ie Ruby, Beryl, et c. And, of course, ''all'' trolls have diamond teeth - -- the only material strong enough to grind and break down rock.



** One half of the BigBadDuumvirate for ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'', [[spoiler:Wolfgang von Uberwald]], is a FauxAffablyEvil sadist and "pureblood" werewolf, who killed his own younger sister for being stuck in human form permanently and helped engineer the conspiracy to kickstart a war between dwarf and troll. Unlike his more sympathetic - if tragically misguided - co-conspirator, his reasons for this are [[ForTheEvulz purely for his own amusement]].

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** One half of the BigBadDuumvirate for ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'', [[spoiler:Wolfgang von Uberwald]], is a FauxAffablyEvil sadist and "pureblood" werewolf, who killed his own younger sister for being stuck in human form permanently and helped engineer the conspiracy to kickstart a war between dwarf and troll. Unlike his more sympathetic - -- if tragically misguided - -- co-conspirator, his reasons for this are [[ForTheEvulz purely for his own amusement]].



* TheHecateSisters: The typical arrangement of a group of Witches (which is not a hard and fast rule - some operate alone, and Nanny Ogg states they can operate in up to groups of four or five. Any more is a problem) is the Maiden, the Mother and... the ''Other One''.

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* TheHecateSisters: The typical arrangement of a group of Witches (which is not a hard and fast rule - -- some operate alone, and Nanny Ogg states they can operate in up to groups of four or five. Any more is a problem) is the Maiden, the Mother and... the ''Other One''.



* TheIgor: An entire family of them that does henching and MadScience professionally. They also pioneer surgical techniques and do it almost recreationally; when an Igor is said to have his father's eyes, it's probably not a figure of speech. They may have been handed down through the generations (a good pair of hands are worth hanging onto as well). One of them has a pet dog made up of the pieces of many other pet dogs; though he's very upset when Scraps gets killed off, he consoles himself that it's only a matter of time until the next thunderstorm. Male Igors are [[KavorkaMan Kavorka Men]] and considered quite the prize for young women, whereas the Igorinas are [[CuteMonsterGirl cute monster girls]] mixed with HeadTurningBeauty - in lieu of scarred up bodies, they are mind-bogglingly attractive except for a bit of cute stitching for show, for example around a wrist like a tattoo, or in a celtic-like pattern on their cheeks. When we finally get an on-screen Igorina (in Literature/MonstrousRegiment) she makes an off-hand remark that the scars from the stitching can be gotten rid of in 15 minutes with the right ointment. That means that Igors go around covered in scars ''because that's how Igors want to look''. Other books clarify that the igor stitches are actually clan markings.

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* TheIgor: An entire family of them that does henching and MadScience professionally. They also pioneer surgical techniques and do it almost recreationally; when an Igor is said to have his father's eyes, it's probably not a figure of speech. They may have been handed down through the generations (a good pair of hands are worth hanging onto as well). One of them has a pet dog made up of the pieces of many other pet dogs; though he's very upset when Scraps gets killed off, he consoles himself that it's only a matter of time until the next thunderstorm. Male Igors are [[KavorkaMan Kavorka Men]] and considered quite the prize for young women, whereas the Igorinas are [[CuteMonsterGirl cute monster girls]] mixed with HeadTurningBeauty - -- in lieu of scarred up bodies, they are mind-bogglingly attractive except for a bit of cute stitching for show, for example around a wrist like a tattoo, or in a celtic-like pattern on their cheeks. When we finally get an on-screen Igorina (in Literature/MonstrousRegiment) she makes an off-hand remark that the scars from the stitching can be gotten rid of in 15 minutes with the right ointment. That means that Igors go around covered in scars ''because that's how Igors want to look''. Other books clarify that the igor stitches are actually clan markings.



* LadyLegionnaireWear: The ladies of the Watch wear armor with this - in ''Men At Arms'' it's said that Angua, the first female to join the Watch, will need the blacksmith to hammer out her breastplate (which was the same issue as the male watchmen's) by quite a bit before she can wear it.

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* LadyLegionnaireWear: The ladies of the Watch wear armor with this - -- in ''Men At Arms'' it's said that Angua, the first female to join the Watch, will need the blacksmith to hammer out her breastplate (which was the same issue as the male watchmen's) by quite a bit before she can wear it.



* LowFantasy: Increasingly - starting around "Men at Arms", the focus shifts away from reality-warping threats and towards how a city like Ankh-Morpork would actually work. By "Going Postal" and "Making Money", we've got books about corrupt executives, bank fraud and the power of good press...that happen to also involve golems, wizards and banshees.

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* LowFantasy: Increasingly - -- starting around "Men at Arms", the focus shifts away from reality-warping threats and towards how a city like Ankh-Morpork would actually work. By "Going Postal" and "Making Money", we've got books about corrupt executives, bank fraud and the power of good press...that happen to also involve golems, wizards and banshees.



** Elves are similarly stuck in their own dimension(s), although there are weak points where travel is possible - lots of them in the Ramtop mountains.

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** Elves are similarly stuck in their own dimension(s), although there are weak points where travel is possible - -- lots of them in the Ramtop mountains.



* OhMyGods: Common, with the multiple gods the Disc sports. The dwarfs have their own, unique version - they don't believe in gods as such (Discworld dwarfs don't go in for belief, due to their lifestyles), but they have them anyway, because swearing to gods is better than going "Oh, Random Fluctuations In Space And Time!"

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* OhMyGods: Common, with the multiple gods the Disc sports. The dwarfs have their own, unique version - -- they don't believe in gods as such (Discworld dwarfs don't go in for belief, due to their lifestyles), but they have them anyway, because swearing to gods is better than going "Oh, Random Fluctuations In Space And Time!"



-->"The first Brother walked toward the light, and stood under the open sky. Thus he became too tall. He was the first Man. He found no Laws and he was enlightened. The second Brother walked toward the darkness, and stood under a roof of stone. Thus he achieved the correct height. He was the first Dwarf. He found the Laws Tak had written, and he was endarkened." - from the Discworld dwarf CreationMyth

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-->"The first Brother walked toward the light, and stood under the open sky. Thus he became too tall. He was the first Man. He found no Laws and he was enlightened. The second Brother walked toward the darkness, and stood under a roof of stone. Thus he achieved the correct height. He was the first Dwarf. He found the Laws Tak had written, and he was endarkened." - -- from the Discworld dwarf CreationMyth



* OurGodsAreDifferent: Gods on the Disc come in two basic varieties - your average God, who is a short-tempered git with as much self-control as a kid with a magnifying glass, and Creators, who create worlds [=and/or=] life. The Disk's Creator was apparently a pretty absent-minded one.

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* OurGodsAreDifferent: Gods on the Disc come in two basic varieties - -- your average God, who is a short-tempered git with as much self-control as a kid with a magnifying glass, and Creators, who create worlds [=and/or=] life. The Disk's Creator was apparently a pretty absent-minded one.



* OurPixiesAreDifferent: The [=NacMacFeegle=]. Rowdy, foul of mouth (if anyone can interpret them), drunken, prone to violence and generally a four or five inches tall variant on a theme of the ViolentGlaswegian. They tolerate being described as Pictsies, but Gods help anyone who calls them "fairies". Then again, fairies also exist in Creator/TerryPratchett's Elf-realm. They may ''look'' like enchanting tiny women with wings - but the Fey are really an insectoid hive-creature akin to hornets and with a taste for meat.

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* OurPixiesAreDifferent: The [=NacMacFeegle=]. Rowdy, foul of mouth (if anyone can interpret them), drunken, prone to violence and generally a four or five inches tall variant on a theme of the ViolentGlaswegian. They tolerate being described as Pictsies, but Gods help anyone who calls them "fairies". Then again, fairies also exist in Creator/TerryPratchett's Elf-realm. They may ''look'' like enchanting tiny women with wings - -- but the Fey are really an insectoid hive-creature akin to hornets and with a taste for meat.



** Jason Ogg, the blacksmith of Lancre is the best blacksmith and farrier on the Disc, but the cost is he must take up every challenge; from the stupid (having to shoe an ant - he made an anvil from a pinhead) to the exceptional (forging silver shoes for a Unicorn and shoeing the beast). He simply is not allowed to refuse a commission.

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** Jason Ogg, the blacksmith of Lancre is the best blacksmith and farrier on the Disc, but the cost is he must take up every challenge; from the stupid (having to shoe an ant - -- he made an anvil from a pinhead) to the exceptional (forging silver shoes for a Unicorn and shoeing the beast). He simply is not allowed to refuse a commission.



* PowerLimiter: The [[WizardingSchool Unseen University]] of the Wizards is full of bureaucracy, bickering, eating, lazing around, and pointless activities in general - all of which are found to have been '''very''' necessary when the system is temporarily overturned in ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'' and ''[[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the entire wizarding population goes into all-out destruction-mode]].'' It turns out that the base instinct of a wizard is to build a magic tower and obliterate all other wizards until they're the last one (in fact, the the ancient plural of "wizard" was "war"). The current comforts, luxuries, and politics of the Unseen University act as checks to keep that instinct suppressed.

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* PowerLimiter: The [[WizardingSchool Unseen University]] of the Wizards is full of bureaucracy, bickering, eating, lazing around, and pointless activities in general - -- all of which are found to have been '''very''' necessary when the system is temporarily overturned in ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'' and ''[[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the entire wizarding population goes into all-out destruction-mode]].'' It turns out that the base instinct of a wizard is to build a magic tower and obliterate all other wizards until they're the last one (in fact, the the ancient plural of "wizard" was "war"). The current comforts, luxuries, and politics of the Unseen University act as checks to keep that instinct suppressed.



* RuleOfFunny: Explicitly mentioned several times - one footnote makes reference to the "new rules of comedy" which state that the droll results of wild shots in the air must be told to the public.

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* RuleOfFunny: Explicitly mentioned several times - -- one footnote makes reference to the "new rules of comedy" which state that the droll results of wild shots in the air must be told to the public.



* SecondVerseCurse: Parodied - the second verse of ''[[http://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/index.php/We_Can_Rule_You_Wholesale We Can Rule You Wholesale]]'', the anthem of Ankh-Morpork, [[InvokedTrope purposely contains a bunch of mumbling]] since nobody will know it anyway.

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* SecondVerseCurse: Parodied - -- the second verse of ''[[http://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/index.php/We_Can_Rule_You_Wholesale We Can Rule You Wholesale]]'', the anthem of Ankh-Morpork, [[InvokedTrope purposely contains a bunch of mumbling]] since nobody will know it anyway.



* SkeletonMotif: Death, being an anthropomorphic personification of, well, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin death]], lives in a pocket dimension where nearly everything - furniture, tools, his house, etc. - has some kind of bone-and-skull motif to it. Things that aren't are usually something that was brought in from the real world.

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* SkeletonMotif: Death, being an anthropomorphic personification of, well, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin death]], lives in a pocket dimension where nearly everything - -- furniture, tools, his house, etc. - -- has some kind of bone-and-skull motif to it. Things that aren't are usually something that was brought in from the real world.



** However, until the accession of Archchancellor Ridcully created a sort of detente, these Squishy Wizards spent a lot of time making each other go squish - so HyperAwareness and ManipulativeBastard tendencies were survival traits.

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** However, until the accession of Archchancellor Ridcully created a sort of detente, these Squishy Wizards spent a lot of time making each other go squish - -- so HyperAwareness and ManipulativeBastard tendencies were survival traits.


%%* OurNymphsArePrettier: Dryads appear in ''Literature/TheColourOfMagic'', where they live in pocket dimensions within trees and are extremely protective of their homes. Since they're stated to be vanishingly rare, it's possible that their absence from later books is because they've gone extinct. They're also unusual in that they aren't AlwaysFemale; as the dryad Druella puts it, "Where do you think acorns come from?".%%Temporarily unlaunched.

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%%* OurNymphsArePrettier: * OurNymphsAreDifferent: Dryads appear in ''Literature/TheColourOfMagic'', where they live in pocket dimensions within trees and are extremely protective of their homes. Since they're stated to be vanishingly rare, it's possible that their absence from later books is because they've gone extinct. They're also unusual in that they aren't AlwaysFemale; as the dryad Druella puts it, "Where do you think acorns come from?".%%Temporarily unlaunched.


** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', the five ruling families of the Agatean empire are the Hongs, the Sungs, the Tangs, the Fangs, and the [=McSweenys=]. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d twice.

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** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', ''Literature/InterestingTimes'', the five ruling families of the Agatean empire are the Hongs, the Sungs, the Tangs, the Fangs, and the [=McSweenys=]. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d twice.


** Ipslore the Red, from ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'', is a horrifyingly [[AbusiveParents abusive father]] who tortures his own son into a living weapon and does not take no for an answer, eventually almost causing the end of the world ''twice''.
** Captain "Mayonnaise" Quirke, the leader of the Day Watch until the end of ''Literature/MenAtArms'', is a racist (both [[FantasticRacism against fictional species]] and against actual human ethnicities) and hideously incompetent at keeping the peace, to the point he causes several race riots when he arrests a troll that was completely incapable of committing the murder it's accused of. He also indulges in literally [[KickTheDog kicking the dog Gaspode]] for no reason except spite towards the Night Watch having one on their base. ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' also shows him as deeply corrupt in the past and later joining a hit squad to kill John Keel (actually Vimes in disguise) when disciplined by him.
** Dragon-King of Arms, in ''Literature/FeetOfClay'', is insufferable towards Vimes in pointing out his family's bad reputation, as well as racist against Angua for being a werewolf. He's also [[spoiler: exploiting the golems and engineering the conspiracy to incapacitate Vetinari, which kills an innocent family. He feels no remorse for the deaths he causes from these activities, even indirectly.]]

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** Ipslore the Red, from ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'', is a horrifyingly [[AbusiveParents abusive father]] who tortures his own son into a living weapon and does not take no for an answer, eventually almost causing the end of the world ''twice''.
''twice''. Even his FreudianExcuse and initially legitimate grievance do little to mitigate this, as he becomes far worse than his perceived aggressors, targets people completely unrelated to his initial vengeance and will respond to any act of perceived defiance with maximum aggression.
** Captain "Mayonnaise" Quirke, the leader of the the Ankh-Morpork Day Watch until the end of ''Literature/MenAtArms'', is a racist (both [[FantasticRacism against fictional species]] and against actual human ethnicities) and hideously incompetent at keeping the peace, to the point he causes several race riots when he arrests a troll that was completely incapable of committing the murder it's accused of. He also indulges in literally [[KickTheDog kicking the dog Gaspode]] for no reason except spite towards the Night Watch having one on their base. ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' also shows him as deeply corrupt in the past and later joining a hit squad to kill John Keel (actually Vimes in disguise) when disciplined by him.
him for his crimes, having the gall to be outraged for this. All of this makes it deeply cathartic when Carrot deposes him and punches him out, leaving him never to be seen again.
** The closest to a human BigBad in ''Literature/SoulMusic'', Mr Clete is the secretary of the musicians guild who keeps trying to have the Band with Rocks In killed [[EvilIsPetty purely because they won't pay the extortionate guild fee]], to the point that he hires the Assassins against them and then pursues them even when it's not in his best interest. He also attempts to kill his own underling, Satchelmouth, when he refuses to kill the band. The book explicitly notes that he might not be "evil" at the start, but its comparison of him to a rat is still a sign he's loathsome and unpleasant.
** Dragon-King of Arms, in ''Literature/FeetOfClay'', is insufferable towards Vimes in pointing out his family's bad reputation, as well as racist against Angua for being a werewolf. He's also [[spoiler: exploiting [[spoiler:exploiting the golems and engineering the conspiracy to incapacitate Vetinari, which kills an innocent family. He feels no remorse for the deaths he causes from these activities, even indirectly.]]]]
** One half of the BigBadDuumvirate for ''Literature/TheFifthElephant'', [[spoiler:Wolfgang von Uberwald]], is a FauxAffablyEvil sadist and "pureblood" werewolf, who killed his own younger sister for being stuck in human form permanently and helped engineer the conspiracy to kickstart a war between dwarf and troll. Unlike his more sympathetic - if tragically misguided - co-conspirator, his reasons for this are [[ForTheEvulz purely for his own amusement]].
** The true BigBad of ''Literature/{{Thud}}'', [[spoiler:Grag Ardent]], ends up responsible for the death of multiple innocent dwarves and covers up further deaths in the same area, later attempting to start war against trolls out of misguided religious spite and [[{{Hypocrite}} manipulating various historical tomes in spite of his apparent hatred of "destroying words]]. Returning in ''Literature/RaisingSteam'', he expands his targets to "anyone not a [[NoTrueScotsman true dwarf]]", including goblins and humans, resulting in even more pointless deaths out of his own pettiness. While he does have a redeeming trait in [[spoiler:sparing Albrecht Albrechtsson]], this still does little to make him likeable in any way.



** The first, [[spoiler: Gravid Rust]], was mentioned in ''Literature/FeetOfClay'' as having shot a servant with a crossbow for [[DisproportionateRetribution tying up his shoelaces wrongly]], but then moves on to heading a large trafficking ring where the trafficked goblins are enslaved and worked to death in horrifying conditions. On top of that, he's so insufferable and smug that fellow HateSink, [[spoiler:Stratford]] wants to turn King's Evidence not for his own life, but to spite his employer. He ultimately [[spoiler:proves so loathsome that Vetinari, usually pragmatic enough to restrain himself, has him quietly assassinated even after his exile]].
** The aforementioned [[spoiler:Stratford]] is a violent, petty thug and DragonInChief for the aforementioned boss and the magistrates, responsible for the goblin trafficking and enslavement which even sees their children worked to death. He'll also willingly target children [[EvilIsPetty even when it doesn't benefit his work]].

to:

** *** The first, [[spoiler: Gravid Rust]], was mentioned in ''Literature/FeetOfClay'' as having shot a servant with a crossbow for [[DisproportionateRetribution tying up his shoelaces wrongly]], but then moves on to heading a large trafficking ring where the trafficked goblins are enslaved and worked to death in horrifying conditions. On top of that, he's so insufferable and smug that fellow HateSink, [[spoiler:Stratford]] wants to turn King's Evidence not for his own life, but to spite his employer. He ultimately [[spoiler:proves so loathsome that Vetinari, usually pragmatic enough to restrain himself, has him quietly assassinated even after his exile]].
** *** The aforementioned [[spoiler:Stratford]] is a violent, petty thug and DragonInChief for the aforementioned boss and the magistrates, responsible for the goblin trafficking and enslavement which even sees their children worked to death. He'll also willingly target children [[EvilIsPetty even when it doesn't benefit his work]].

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** Of course this isn't how such a system would actually work, as it would be like counting "eight, nine, nine-one, nine-two..." It should actually follow "one, two, three, many, one-one, one-two, one-three, one-many, two-one...".

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* BilingualAnimal: Recurring character Gaspode the Wonder Dog learned to speak Morporkian (i.e. [[FantasyCounterpartCulture English]]) via magic, but has no trouble speaking to other dogs, or even wolves. On several occasions, he acts as a cross-species translator.

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* SlippingIntoStink: Young Assassin Jocasta Wiggs is sent to target Sam Vimes. A few wrong steps after getting into Ramkin Manor, she ends up treading what is ''mainly'' water in the septic tank.

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* MiningForCookies: Treacle mines are mentioned in several books, and Treacle Mine Road is a location in Ankh-Morpork. Creator/TerryPratchett actually goes into a bit of detail as to how these occurred; the treacle seams are made of fossilised sugar cane. ''The Discworld Companion'' says that there were also treacle deposits under Genua, but the heat and moisture transformed them into rum springs.

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* AerithAndBob: Unusual names like Rincewind, Havelock and Eskarina exist besides “normal” ones like Sam, Henry and Tiffany.
** There are also some weird naming traditions in the Ramtops, giving you names like Yodel Lightly, King My-God-He's-Heavy the First, and Esmerelda Margaret Note Spelling of Lancre.
** Any number of plain old Ankh-Morpork citizens have names like Findthee Swing or Legitimate First. (Can't blame a mother for being proud.)
** Traditional Omnian names like Smite-the-Unbeliever-With-Cunning-Arguments and Visit-the-Infidel-with-Explanatory-Pamphlets
** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', the five ruling families of the Agatean empire are the Hongs, the Sungs, the Tangs, the Fangs, and the [=McSweenys=]. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d twice.
** Even the nonhumans' naming conventions took a while to get established, with incongruities like dwarfs named Bjorn and Fruntkin, or a troll in ''Moving Pictures'' choosing "Rock" as a film pseudonym, despite this being a racist term for his species.
** One-Man-Bucket and his unfortunate elder brother.
** Then there's poor Moist, whose name isn't even normal for Discworld, going by the fact that he's heard a lot of jokes about it.


** Captain "Mayonnaise" Quirke, the leader of the Day Watch until the end of ''Literature/MenAtArms'', is a racist (both [[FantasticRacism against fictional species]] and against actual human ethnicities) and hideously incompetent at keeping the peace, to the point he causes several race riots when he arrests a troll that was completely incapable of committing the murder it's accused of. ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' also shows him as deeply corrupt in the past and later joining a hit squad to kill John Keel (actually Vimes in disguise) when disciplined by him.

to:

** Captain "Mayonnaise" Quirke, the leader of the Day Watch until the end of ''Literature/MenAtArms'', is a racist (both [[FantasticRacism against fictional species]] and against actual human ethnicities) and hideously incompetent at keeping the peace, to the point he causes several race riots when he arrests a troll that was completely incapable of committing the murder it's accused of. He also indulges in literally [[KickTheDog kicking the dog Gaspode]] for no reason except spite towards the Night Watch having one on their base. ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' also shows him as deeply corrupt in the past and later joining a hit squad to kill John Keel (actually Vimes in disguise) when disciplined by him.


Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/{{Snuff}}'' manages to get two of these in the same book, made more impressive by one of them ''[[TheGhost never appearing on page]]'':
** The first, [[spoiler: Gravid Rust]], was mentioned in ''Literature/FeetOfClay'' as having shot a servant with a crossbow for [[DisproportionateRetribution tying up his shoelaces wrongly]], but then moves on to heading a large trafficking ring where the trafficked goblins are enslaved and worked to death in horrifying conditions. On top of that, he's so insufferable and smug that fellow HateSink, [[spoiler:Stratford]] wants to turn King's Evidence not for his own life, but to spite his employer. He ultimately [[spoiler:proves so loathsome that Vetinari, usually pragmatic enough to restrain himself, has him quietly assassinated even after his exile]].
** The aforementioned [[spoiler:Stratford]] is a violent, petty thug and DragonInChief for the aforementioned boss and the magistrates, responsible for the goblin trafficking and enslavement which even sees their children worked to death. He'll also willingly target children [[EvilIsPetty even when it doesn't benefit his work]].


* HateSink: Though many characters are humorous and sympathetic, even the villains, there are plenty of deeply unpleasant, detestable characters:
** Ipslore the Red, from ''Literature/{{Sourcery}}'', is a horrifyingly [[AbusiveParents abusive father]] who tortures his own son into a living weapon and does not take no for an answer, eventually almost causing the end of the world ''twice''.
** Captain "Mayonnaise" Quirke, the leader of the Day Watch until the end of ''Literature/MenAtArms'', is a racist (both [[FantasticRacism against fictional species]] and against actual human ethnicities) and hideously incompetent at keeping the peace, to the point he causes several race riots when he arrests a troll that was completely incapable of committing the murder it's accused of. ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' also shows him as deeply corrupt in the past and later joining a hit squad to kill John Keel (actually Vimes in disguise) when disciplined by him.
** Dragon-King of Arms, in ''Literature/FeetOfClay'', is insufferable towards Vimes in pointing out his family's bad reputation, as well as racist against Angua for being a werewolf. He's also [[spoiler: exploiting the golems and engineering the conspiracy to incapacitate Vetinari, which kills an innocent family. He feels no remorse for the deaths he causes from these activities, even indirectly.]]
** The Cunning Man, antagonist for ''Literature/IShallWearMidnight'', targets witches that catch his attention while [[KnightTemplar believing them all in need of purging]]. He does this by causing a HatePlague, poisoning minds against witches and engineering scenarios where people die so he can blame the witch in question. The climax of the book even has him murder a canary [[ForTheEvulz for no practical reason]].



* HeelFaceTown: While Ankh-Morpork May still have a less than stellar reputation, ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' reveals that it used to be much, much worse before Lord Vetinari became patrician. Later on, it actually starting to become a decent city due in part to the progress of technology such as trains and c-mail.

to:

* HeelFaceTown: While Ankh-Morpork May still have a less than stellar reputation, ''Literature/NightWatchDiscworld'' reveals that it used to be much, much worse before Lord Vetinari became patrician. Later on, it it's actually starting to become a decent city due in part to the progress of technology such as trains and c-mail.



** Played straight with elves, as saying or even ''thinking'' their name too much tends to attract them.

to:

** Played straight with elves, as saying or even ''thinking'' their name too much tends to attract them.them, especially if the walls of reality are wearing thin.



** Vampires can be killed/turned to dust temporarily, but almost always come back. A sword through the chest has no effect on them, and they can survive being beheaded (and then direct you how to reattach their head).

to:

** Vampires can be killed/turned to dust temporarily, but almost always come back.back when exposed to drops of blood. A sword through the chest has no effect on them, and they can survive being beheaded (and then direct you how to reattach their head). It is, however, pointed out that scattering their dust or throwing their remains off the edge of the Disc would leave them [[AndIMustScream begging for the end]].


There are forty-one books in the series, five of them young adult, as well as several short stories. There are also [[SpinOff Discworld calendars, diaries, maps]], [[UniverseCompendium compendia]], three {{Video Game}}s[[note]]Four if you include the ''Colour Of Magic'' 1986 text adventure[[/note]], five {{Board Game}}s[[note]]One based on the Watch, one on the witches, one based on a power struggle for Ankh-Morpork, the {{Defictionalised}} chess-analogue Thud and one based on the semaphore system[[/note]], and a pen and paper [[TabletopRPG RPG]], each with [[WordOfGod additional background information]] about the Disc. All the books have been adapted for the stage, two have become animated series, and three (technically four, as ''The Colour of Magic'' and ''The Light Fantastic'' were filmed as a single story under the former title, but the second is a direct follow-on) have become live-action {{Made For TV Movie}}s. A police procedural based around the Ankh-Morpork Watch is in the works, and discussions are underway for cinema films of ''Mort'' and ''The Wee Free Men''

to:

There are forty-one books in the series, five six of them young adult, as well as several short stories. There are also [[SpinOff Discworld calendars, diaries, maps]], [[UniverseCompendium compendia]], three {{Video Game}}s[[note]]Four if you include the ''Colour Of Magic'' 1986 text adventure[[/note]], five {{Board Game}}s[[note]]One based on the Watch, one on the witches, one based on a power struggle for Ankh-Morpork, the {{Defictionalised}} chess-analogue Thud and one based on the semaphore system[[/note]], and a pen and paper [[TabletopRPG RPG]], each with [[WordOfGod additional background information]] about the Disc. All the books have been adapted for the stage, two have become animated series, and three (technically four, as ''The Colour of Magic'' and ''The Light Fantastic'' were filmed as a single story under the former title, but the second is a direct follow-on) have become live-action {{Made For TV Movie}}s. A police procedural based around the Ankh-Morpork Watch is in the works, and discussions are underway for cinema films of ''Mort'' and ''The Wee Free Men''


* OurNymphsArePrettier: Dryads appear in ''Literature/TheColourOfMagic'', where they live in pocket dimensions within trees and are extremely protective of their homes. Since they're stated to be vanishingly rare, it's possible that their absence from later books is because they've gone extinct. They're also unusual in that they aren't AlwaysFemale; as the dryad Druella puts it, "Where do you think acorns come from?".

to:

* %%* OurNymphsArePrettier: Dryads appear in ''Literature/TheColourOfMagic'', where they live in pocket dimensions within trees and are extremely protective of their homes. Since they're stated to be vanishingly rare, it's possible that their absence from later books is because they've gone extinct. They're also unusual in that they aren't AlwaysFemale; as the dryad Druella puts it, "Where do you think acorns come from?".%%Temporarily unlaunched.

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