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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The bit about Ruth uncovering Boaz's feet while he slept as part of getting him to marry her. Biblical scholars debate that Ruth [[GetTheeToANunnery did more than just expose Boaz's feet that night]]. But because this is the good romantic story in the Bible, [[ChasteHero Boaz puts a stop to it]]. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming He still lets her stay the night.]]

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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The bit about Ruth uncovering Boaz's feet while he slept as part of getting him to marry her. Biblical scholars debate that Ruth [[GetTheeToANunnery did more than just expose Boaz's feet that night]]. But because this is the good romantic story in the Bible, [[ChasteHero Boaz puts a stop to it]]. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming He still lets her stay the night.]]


* ConvertingForReligion: With a twist. After Ruth's husband dies her mother-in-law, Naomi, advises her and Orpah to return to their old homes and religion. Ruth, however, stays out of loyalty to Naomi.

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* ConvertingForReligion: ConvertingForLove: With a twist. After Ruth's husband dies her mother-in-law, Naomi, advises her and Orpah to return to their old homes and religion. Ruth, however, stays out of loyalty to Naomi.

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* ConvertingForReligion: With a twist. After Ruth's husband dies her mother-in-law, Naomi, advises her and Orpah to return to their old homes and religion. Ruth, however, stays out of loyalty to Naomi.


!!"For your tropes shall be my tropes"

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!!"For your tropes shall be my tropes"tropes":


* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's husband's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage (that is, Deuteronomy 25:5-6), be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.

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* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's husband's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage (that is, Deuteronomy 25:5-6), be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth had hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.


* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage (that is, Deuteronomy 25:5-6), be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.

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* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's husband's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage (that is, Deuteronomy 25:5-6), be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.

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* BestFriendsInLaw: Naomi and Ruth are incredibly close.

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* ObnoxiousInLaws: Inverted, quite famously. Ruth and Naomi get along swimmingly, even after Naomi's son has died.


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* PlatonicDeclarationOfLove: The "where you go, I will follow" quote.


* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage, be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.

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* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage, marriage (that is, Deuteronomy 25:5-6), be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.

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* MandatoryFatherhood: Boaz, one of Naomi's relatives, was to be the man who would, by the Mosaic Law of levirate marriage, be the one who would marry his relative's widow so that he would raise up a son for her dead husband -- or so Naomi and Ruth hoped, until Boaz revealed that there was a relative much closer in relation to Naomi than he, and that he was next in line to him. In chapter 4, when he gets this relative before witnesses to see if he would agree to acquire Ruth as his wife, the relative backs out, citing that it would damage his own inheritance, and thus pulls off his own sandal as an attestation that he was relinquishing the right to marry Ruth to Boaz. Boaz then marries Ruth and fathers a child with her, who becomes part of the lineage of King David.


A short story set in the time of the Literature/BookOfJudges , detailing how Ruth, a Moabite widow, finds a new husband.

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A short story set in the time of the Literature/BookOfJudges , Literature/BookOfJudges, detailing how Ruth, a Moabite widow, finds a new husband.husband. That new husband, as it turns out, is a relative of her mother-in-law Naomi's husband, and part of the lineage that would produce King David (and, according to Christians, the Messiah and Savior Jesus Christ).


* SequelHook: The genealogy at the end connects this story to the [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Davidic kingship]].

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* SequelHook: The genealogy at the end connects this story to the [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Davidic Davidic]] [[Literature/BooksOfKings kingship]].


* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The bit about Ruth uncovering Boaz's feet while he slept as part of getting him to marry her. Biblical scholars debate that Ruth did more than just expose Boaz's feet that night. But because this is the good romantic story in the Bible, Boaz puts a stop to it. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming He still lets her stay the night.]]

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* GetTheeToANunnery: The reference to Boaz’s feet may have meant more than his “feet.”
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The bit about Ruth uncovering Boaz's feet while he slept as part of getting him to marry her. Biblical scholars debate that Ruth [[GetTheeToANunnery did more than just expose Boaz's feet that night. night]]. But because this is the good romantic story in the Bible, [[ChasteHero Boaz puts a stop to it.it]]. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming He still lets her stay the night.]]


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* MalignedMixedMarriage: Averted (maybe). Despite laws about intermarriage, there is no explicit critique about either Chilion (Naomi's son) or Boaz marrying Ruth. However, in Chilion’s case, he dies, which [[ImpliedTrope some interpret]] as punishment for both leaving Israel and marrying a Moabite. In Boaz’s case, Ruth adopts the Israelite religion, so this is less of a problem.


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* MatzoFever: Ruth [[UpToEleven to the extreme]]!


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* PresentAbsence: This is the first book of the Bible (in the Christian ordering) where God takes no explicit actions or directly communicates with any of the people. Nevertheless, God is referenced by Ruth and Boaz, and the closing genealogy suggests to some God’s ultimate control over events.


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* SequelHook: The genealogy at the end connects this story to the [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Davidic kingship]].


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* ShiksaGoddess: Ruth is THE UrExample.


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* TraumaCongaLine: Naomi goes through this in the first chapter: forced to flee Israel because of famine, her husband dies, and then both her sons die. Naomi lampshades this by renaming herself “Mara,” meaning “bitterness.”



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-->-- '''Ruth 1:16'''



!!Tropes

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!!Tropes!!"For your tropes shall be my tropes"

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* SecondLove: Ruth's first husband dies early in the book, and is barely mentioned afterward. Only one verse even tells us specifically which one of Naomi's sons he was (it was Mahlon).

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