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The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the Major Prophets of the Christian Old Testament. The words were written by the 8th century BCE prophet Isaiah, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. Scholars have speculated that there are 3 separate collections of oracles of Isaiah - ''Proto-Isaiah'' (Ch. 1-39), containing the words of Isaiah, ''Deutero-Isaiah'' (Ch. 40-55), the work of an unknown author during the exile, and ''Trito-Isaiah'' (Ch. 56-66), an anthology written after the return from Babylon. Despite this view, some speculate that the message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-33) focuses on judgment and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.

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The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the Major Prophets of the Christian Old Testament. The words were written by the 8th century BCE prophet Isaiah, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. captivity.

Scholars have speculated that there are 3 separate collections of oracles of Isaiah - ''Proto-Isaiah'' (Ch. 1-39), containing the words of Isaiah, ''Deutero-Isaiah'' (Ch. 40-55), the work of an unknown author during the exile, and ''Trito-Isaiah'' (Ch. 56-66), an anthology written after the return from Babylon. Despite this view, some speculate that the message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-33) focuses on judgment and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.

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* CarpeDiem: In Isaiah 22:13 (English Standard Version):
-->''...and behold, joy and gladness,''
-->''killing oxen and slaughtering sheep,''
-->''eating flesh and drinking wine.''
-->''“Let us eat and drink,''
-->''for tomorrow we die.”''


The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the Major Prophets of the Christian Old Testament. The words were written by the 8th century BCE prophet Isaiah ben Amoz, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. Scholars have speculated that there are 3 separate collections of oracles of Isaiah - ''Proto-Isaiah'' (Ch. 1-39), containing the words of Isaiah, ''Deutero-Isaiah'' (Ch. 40-55), the work of an unknown author during the exile, and ''Trito-Isaiah'' (Ch. 56-66), an anthology written after the return from Babylon. Despite this view, some speculate that the message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-33) focuses on judgment and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.

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The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the Major Prophets of the Christian Old Testament. The words were written by the 8th century BCE prophet Isaiah ben Amoz, Isaiah, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. Scholars have speculated that there are 3 separate collections of oracles of Isaiah - ''Proto-Isaiah'' (Ch. 1-39), containing the words of Isaiah, ''Deutero-Isaiah'' (Ch. 40-55), the work of an unknown author during the exile, and ''Trito-Isaiah'' (Ch. 56-66), an anthology written after the return from Babylon. Despite this view, some speculate that the message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-33) focuses on judgment and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.

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* HatePlague: In Isaiah 19:2, God plans to spread division among the Egyptians.
-->''"I will set the Egyptians against the Egyptians: and they shall fight every one against his brother, and every one against his neighbour; city against city, and kingdom against kingdom."''


* ShatteredWorld: Isaiah 13:13 The Guy Upstairs moves the earth out of it's place with the heavens shaking, but only because the world is too evil at that point. Mentioned again in other places such as the book of Revelation where ''every mountain and island'' will vanish and the stars will ''fall'' out of the sky, with Isaiah mentioning some of them at least falling to Earth like figs. Sounds a bit like asteroids right there.

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* ShatteredWorld: In Isaiah 13:13 The Guy Upstairs 13:13, God moves the earth out of it's its place with the heavens shaking, but only because the world is too evil at that point. Mentioned again in other places such as the book of Revelation where ''every mountain and island'' will vanish and the stars will ''fall'' out of the sky, with Isaiah mentioning some of them at least falling to Earth like figs. Sounds a bit like asteroids right there.


The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Major Prophets (Isaiah being the first of the prophets) and was presumably written around 8th century BCE, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. The message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-33) focuses on judgment and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.

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The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Major Latter Prophets (Isaiah being in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the prophets) and was presumably Major Prophets of the Christian Old Testament. The words were written around by the 8th century BCE, BCE prophet Isaiah ben Amoz, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. The Scholars have speculated that there are 3 separate collections of oracles of Isaiah - ''Proto-Isaiah'' (Ch. 1-39), containing the words of Isaiah, ''Deutero-Isaiah'' (Ch. 40-55), the work of an unknown author during the exile, and ''Trito-Isaiah'' (Ch. 56-66), an anthology written after the return from Babylon. Despite this view, some speculate that the message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-33) focuses on judgment and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.


* WhereIsYourXNow: King Sennacherib of Assyria does this to King Hezekiah when he threatens to destroy Judah, saying "where are the gods" of the nations that he had conquered and suggesting that Hezekiah's God will not save him. [[DoNotTauntCthulhu It doesn't work well for the Assyrian king]] when, after King Hezekiah prays to God, Sennacherib finds that all 185,000 of his troops are dead. (This also appears in [[Literature/BooksOfKings 2nd Kings]].)

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* WhereIsYourXNow: WhereIsYourXNow:
** God does this when speaking to Egypt in Isaiah 19:11-12:
-->''Surely the princes of Zoan are fools;''
-->''the counsel of the wise counselors of Pharaoh has become stupid.''
-->''How can you say to Pharaoh,''
-->''“I am a son of the wise,''
-->''a son of ancient kings?”''
-->''Where are they? Where are your wise men?''
-->''Let them tell you now, and let them understand''
-->''what the Lord of Hosts''
-->''has purposed against Egypt.''
**
King Sennacherib of Assyria does this to King Hezekiah when he threatens to destroy Judah, saying "where are the gods" of the nations that he had conquered and suggesting that Hezekiah's God will not save him. [[DoNotTauntCthulhu It doesn't work well for the Assyrian king]] when, after King Hezekiah prays to God, Sennacherib finds that all 185,000 of his troops are dead. (This also appears in [[Literature/BooksOfKings 2nd Kings]].)


* MessianicArchetype: The TropeNamer, since Isaiah prophesies that a Messiah will come to restore the kingdom of Israel. However, since Messianic Archetypes are specifically modeled after [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} the Christian Messiah]], Isaiah's Messiah doesn't fit the description at all, because either Isaiah is actually talked about Christ and thus obviously not copying him or he's describing someone completely unrelated to Christ, because Isaiah could only have known about the yet-to-be-born carpenter through revelation.


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* MessianicArchetype: The TropeNamer, since Isaiah prophesies that a Messiah will come to restore the kingdom of Israel. However, since Messianic Archetypes are specifically modeled after [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} the Christian Messiah]], Isaiah's Messiah doesn't fit the description at all, because either Isaiah is actually talked about Christ and thus obviously not copying him or he's describing someone completely unrelated to Christ, because Isaiah could only have known about the yet-to-be-born carpenter through revelation.

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* IHaveManyNames: Isaiah 9:6: "And he shall be called Wonderful Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace..." (Although the Book of Isaiah never mentions Jesus by name, most Christians interpret its prophecy of a Messiah to be about Jesus.)

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* OurGodsAreDifferent: Monotheism is stated in Isaiah 44:6:
-->''"Thus saith the LORD the King of Israel, and his redeemer the LORD of hosts; I am the first, and I am the last; and beside me there is no God."''


The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Major Prophets (Isaiah being the first of the prophets). The story is about God appointing Isaiah to deliver a message to His people who have grown corrupted and sinful. The message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-39) being God's judgment upon His people for their sins while the second half (40-66) being God redeeming them and bringing hope in their lives.

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The Book of Isaiah is the first book of the Major Prophets (Isaiah being the first of the prophets). The story is about God appointing Isaiah to deliver a message to His people who have grown corrupted prophets) and sinful. was presumably written around 8th century BCE, though there is evidence that the majority of the book was written during and after the Babylonian captivity. The message of the book is split into two - the first half (1-39) being God's (1-33) focuses on judgment upon His people for their sins and restoration of Judah, Jerusalem, and the nations, while the second half (40-66) being God redeeming them and bringing hope in their lives.(34-66) presumes that judgment was declared but restoration will follow.


* KillItWithFire: Two verses show that God will inflict this on sinners - Isaiah 33:14 and Isaiah 66:24. Some Christians interpret this to mean FireAndBrimstoneHell.

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* KillItWithFire: Two verses show that God will inflict this on sinners - Isaiah 33:14 and Isaiah 66:24. Some Christians interpret this believe these passages refer to mean FireAndBrimstoneHell.sinners [[FireAndBrimstoneHell burning in hell]] after the Final Judgment.


* ShamefulStrip: God in His judgment parable against Babylon in Chapter 47 tells the city's personification to strip herself naked and "pass through the waters" where He will meet her in judgment.

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* ShamefulStrip: ShamefulStrip:
** God tells the women in Jerusalem in Isaiah 32:11 (Evangelical Heritage Version), regarding the coming judgment: "Tremble, you complacent women! Be worried, you carefree girls! Strip yourselves naked, and put sackcloth around your waist."
**
God in His judgment parable against Babylon in Chapter 47 tells the city's personification to strip herself naked and "pass through the waters" where He will meet her in judgment.

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* AddedAlliterativeAppeal: Isaiah 24:17 in the Evangelical Heritage Version renders the verse as: "Panic, pit, and peril await all who live on the earth." In the original Hebrew, the verse's first few words are ''pahad, pahat,'' and ''pah''.

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* SinsOfOurFathers: God says through Isaiah regarding the fate of Babylon:
-->''Prepare a place to slaughter his sons''
-->''because of the guilt of their fathers,''
-->''so that they may not rise up to inherit the earth''
-->''and to cover the world with cities.'' (Isaiah 14:21, Evangelical Heritage Version)

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