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* AmbiguouslyGay: Although in the first WWI adventure it is implied that Biggles had a fling with a French baronness/German FemmeFatale spy, by the end of the war, he seems to be completely disinterested in women and rather spends his time flying with 'the boys', Althoug this is handwaved by the fact that the Biggles stories are adventures primarily written for English schoolboys who at their age were generally uninterested in girls as well, there are many instances that a dirty mind looking for clues can interprete as to indicate that there was something more going on between Biggles, his cousin Algie, his protegé Ginger, the fobbish sometines effeminate Bertie and even his German [[foeYayShipping favorite enemy Erich Von Stalhein]]

to:

* AmbiguouslyGay: Although in the first WWI adventure it is implied that Biggles had a fling with a French baronness/German FemmeFatale spy, by the end of the war, he seems to be completely disinterested in women and rather spends his time flying with 'the boys', Althoug this is handwaved by the fact that the Biggles stories are adventures primarily written for English schoolboys who at their age were generally uninterested in girls as well, there are many instances that a dirty mind looking for clues can interprete as to indicate that there was something more going on between Biggles, his cousin Algie, his protegé Ginger, the fobbish sometines effeminate Bertie and even his German [[foeYayShipping [[FoeYayShipping favorite enemy Erich Von Stalhein]]


* GovernmentAgencyOfFiction: After WWII, Biggles is invited by his superior Commodore Raymond to join the 'Air Police', a special brand of Scotland Yard focusing on crimes involving aircraft. Of course there has never been such an agency in real life, as in the books, the ''air Police'' only seems to consist out of Biggles and his team and Raymond as commanding officer and the only cases they solve are almost perfectly suited to become adventure stories.

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* GovernmentAgencyOfFiction: After WWII, Biggles is invited by his superior Commodore Raymond to join the 'Air Police', a special brand of Scotland Yard focusing on crimes involving aircraft. Of course there has never been such an agency in real life, as in the books, the ''air Police'' only seems to consist out of Biggles and his team and Raymond as commanding officer and the only cases they solve that ever come their way are almost perfectly suited to become adventure stories.

Added DiffLines:

* GovernmentAgencyOfFiction: After WWII, Biggles is invited by his superior Commodore Raymond to join the 'Air Police', a special brand of Scotland Yard focusing on crimes involving aircraft. Of course there has never been such an agency in real life, as in the books, the ''air Police'' only seems to consist out of Biggles and his team and Raymond as commanding officer and the only cases they solve are almost perfectly suited to become adventure stories.


* ButtMonkey: Lord Bertram 'Bertie' Lissie. Going through the books, especially the post-war adventures for the 'Air Police' fans noted that of the four protagonists, Bertie always is the most likely to get shot, attacked, beaten or suffer some other unpleasantness on the hands of the adversaries. Yet, he does not seem to mind especially and always signs up for the next adventure.

to:

* ButtMonkey: Lord Bertram 'Bertie' Lissie. Going through the books, especially Especially the post-war adventures for the 'Air Police' fans noted that of the four protagonists, Bertie always is the most likely to get shot, attacked, beaten or suffer some other unpleasantness on the hands of the adversaries. Yet, he does not seem to mind especially and always signs up for the next adventure.



* ChromosomeCasting: Justified in the early novels as all characters are military pilots and mechanics... ergo male. However in the interwar civilian adventures and especially later in the postwar adventures of the 'Air Police' female characters are barely present. As befits a line of stories primarily written for a boy's magazine, flying and crimefighting are exclusively male enterprises.

to:

* ChromosomeCasting: Justified in the early novels as all characters are military pilots and mechanics... ergo male. However in the interwar civilian adventures and especially later in the postwar adventures of the 'Air Police' female characters are barely present. As befits a line of stories primarily written for a 1930's boy's magazine, flying and crimefighting are exclusively male enterprises.



* PolarBearsAndPenguins: Biggles And The Pirates Of The South Pole mentions polar bears on the '''South''' Pole. When in 1991 Francis Bergese drew the comic book version of the adventure, he explicitly drew Biggles plane flying over an iceberg with icebears on it, explaining in a foreword that he HAD to draw the creatures from the North Pole because the book explicitly mentions them.

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* PolarBearsAndPenguins: Biggles "Biggles And The Pirates Of The South Pole Pole" mentions polar bears on the '''South''' Pole. When in 1991 Francis Bergese drew the comic book version of the adventure, he explicitly drew Biggles plane flying over an iceberg with icebears on it, explaining in a foreword that he HAD to draw the creatures from the North Pole because the book explicitly mentions them.



** Near Identical in the 1990's Franco-Belgian comic, especially the first albums written and drawn by Francis Bergese

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** Near Identical in the 1990's Franco-Belgian comic, especially the first albums written and drawn by Francis BergeseBergese. Famously the second album, an almost literal adaptatation of the book "Biggles And The Pirates Of The South Pole" has Bergese draw ice bears in Antarctica because the book explicitly mentions them.


Biggles originated in a series of short stories that Johns (himself a former airman) wrote for ''Popular Flying'' magazine, and the original intention was to provide the fighter pilots of the future with an entertaining way to remember the "tricks of the trade" learned the hard way during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.

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Biggles originated in a series of short stories that Johns (himself a former airman) wrote for ''Popular Flying'' magazine, and the original intention was to provide the fighter pilots of the future with an entertaining way to remember the "tricks of the trade" he learned the hard way during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.



The books continued after the war, with Biggles now a member of the Special Air Police, and Johns continued writing until his death in 1968, though the later books are not as highly regarded.

Although originally written as a realistic Great War airman -- hard-drinking, running on pure nervous energy, often murderously vindictive towards the enemy, and only a matter of time until his number was up -- Biggles then went into ContractualPurity. He became a strict teetotaler, and one of the early stories was [[RetCon retconned]] to replace whisky with lemonade, leading to the bizarre idea of squadrons of young pilots risking their lives to win a crate of lemonade. Similarly, while Biggles had a brief affair in one of the early stories, his young fans were outraged that an Australian radio adaptation had Biggles "go soft" by having a romantic escapade.

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The books continued after the war, with Biggles now a member of the a new branch of Scotland Yard called "the Special Air Police, Police", and Johns continued writing until his death in 1968, though the later books are not as highly regarded.

Although originally written as a realistic Great War airman -- hard-drinking, running on pure nervous energy, often murderously vindictive towards the enemy, and only a matter of time until his number was up -- Biggles then went into ContractualPurity. He became a strict teetotaler, and one of the early stories was [[RetCon retconned]] to replace whisky with lemonade, leading to the bizarre idea of squadrons of young pilots risking their lives to win a crate of lemonade. Similarly, while Biggles had a brief affair in one of the early stories, his later stories were all about the ''man's world'' of flying aeroplanes in which women and especially romantic endeavors have no place. Thus his young fans were outraged that an Australian radio adaptation had Biggles "go soft" by having a romantic escapade.



Biggles holds a place in British popular culture comparable with Flash Gordon in the US, and it's probably not too much of a stretch to suggest that, if Biggles had been an American series, there would have been numerous screen adaptations by now. As it is, only a short-lived 1960s TV series and the SoBadItsGood 1986 ''Film/BigglesAdventuresInTime'' movie (in which Biggles is joined by a time-travelling American salesman) have been made.

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Biggles holds a place in British popular culture comparable with Flash Gordon in the US, Though franchising of the books in other languages, he is still equally well known in the Dutch and French spoeaking countries. Especially after the books spawned several series of Franco-Belgian comics.

Although
it's probably not too much of a stretch to suggest that, if Biggles had been an American series, there would have been numerous screen adaptations by now. As it is, there was only a short-lived 1960s TV series in Britain, an Australian radio-play and the several attempts at comic strips in Belgium, France and Sweden. Finally there is a SoBadItsGood 1986 ''Film/BigglesAdventuresInTime'' movie (in which Biggles is joined by a time-travelling American salesman) have been made.
salesman).



* AccidentNotMurder: In one of the later short stories, the veteran pilot, now a policeman, is asked for his opinion on the death of a girl who had previously had an argument with her pilot boyfriend. She was hit on the head with a blunt instrument and died instantly. The boyfriend is being sought. Biggles reviews the case. The girl was found dead in her garden with no signs of intrusion or struggle. No weapon has been recovered. However, in the photographs is an unopened box of chocolates. Biggles asks about this. It has been disregarded by the police as of no significance, incidental. He asks if this was kept, and discovers one corner of the box is badly crushed out of shape. Then it becomes clear. The pilot boyfriend sought to make up the row with a romantic gesture, dropping a box of chocolates to her in her garden from several hundred feet up. He just aimed too well. Biggles notes it would be like hitting her with a brick, and points to people being killed in the wars by shrapnel, parts of damaged aircraft, or even spent bullet cases dropping from the air. The case now becomes not murder, but death by misadventure.
%%%%* AcePilot: The

to:

* AccidentNotMurder: In one of the later short stories, the veteran pilot, now a policeman, is asked for his opinion on the death of a girl who had previously had an argument with her pilot boyfriend. She was hit on the head with a blunt instrument and died instantly. The boyfriend is being sought. Biggles reviews the case. The girl was found dead in her garden with no signs of intrusion or struggle. No weapon has been recovered. However, in the photographs is an unopened box of chocolates. Biggles asks about this. It has been disregarded by the police as of no significance, incidental. He asks if this was kept, and discovers one corner of the box is badly crushed out of shape. Then it becomes clear. The pilot boyfriend sought to make up the row with a romantic gesture, dropping a box of chocolates to her in her garden from several hundred feet up. He just aimed too well. Biggles notes it would be like hitting her with a brick, and points to people being killed in the wars by shrapnel, parts of damaged aircraft, or even spent bullet cases dropping from the air. The case now becomes not murder, but death by misadventure.
%%%%* AcePilot: TheAcePilot:



* AmbiguouslyGay: Although in the first WWI adventure it is implied that Biggles had a fling with a French baronness/German FemmeFatale spy, by the end of the war, he seems to be completely disinterested in women and rather spends his time flying with 'the boys', Althoug this is handwaved by the fact that the Biggles stories are adventures primarily written for English schoolboys who at their age were generally uninterested in girls as well, there are many instances that by a dirty mind looking for clues can be interpreted as to indicate that there was something more going on between Biggles, his cousin Algie, his protegé Ginger, the fobbish sometines effeminate Bertie and even his German [[foeYayShipping favorite enemy Erich Von Stalhein]]

to:

* AmbiguouslyGay: Although in the first WWI adventure it is implied that Biggles had a fling with a French baronness/German FemmeFatale spy, by the end of the war, he seems to be completely disinterested in women and rather spends his time flying with 'the boys', Althoug this is handwaved by the fact that the Biggles stories are adventures primarily written for English schoolboys who at their age were generally uninterested in girls as well, there are many instances that by a dirty mind looking for clues can be interpreted interprete as to indicate that there was something more going on between Biggles, his cousin Algie, his protegé Ginger, the fobbish sometines effeminate Bertie and even his German [[foeYayShipping favorite enemy Erich Von Stalhein]]



* PolarBearsAndPenguins: Biggles And The Pirates Of The South Pole mentions polar bears on the '''South''' Pole. When in 1991 Francis Bergese drew the comic book version of the adventure, he explicitly drew Biggles plane flying over an iceberg with icebears on it, explaining in a foreword that he HAD to draw the creatures from the North Pole because the book explicitly mentions them.



* UniversalDriversLicense: Played straight for the most part, though probably justified by Biggles having literally ''decades'' of experience in civil and military aviation alike, at least by the time World War 2 rolls around. It was a minor plot point in one volume that he wasn't Instrument Flight Rules-qualified, however.

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* SlidingScaleOfAdaptationModification: in the several comic books, tv sereis and radio plays based the stories.
** LighterAndSofter in the Swedish comic by Björn Karlström and the Australian audioplay. Both also introduce a female team member to the story.
** Near Identical in the 1990's Franco-Belgian comic, especially the first albums written and drawn by Francis Bergese
** DarkerAndEdgier in the last issues of said comics after Bergese left and was replaced by Michel Oleffe(writing) and Eric Loutte (drawings). Oleffe's stories were simply 'based on' the Biggles characters and both characters and storylines are much more violent.
* UniversalDriversLicense: Played straight for the most part, though probably justified by Biggles having literally ''decades'' of experience in civil and military aviation alike, at least by the time World War 2 rolls around. It was a minor plot point in one later volume that he wasn't Instrument Flight Rules-qualified, however.


* AmbiguouslyGay: Biggles being at least a non-practicing gay can be inferred from the books given a modern dirty mind. It is a verifiable detail that only ''one'' woman even came close to seducing Biggles away from the manly embrace of his chums. A blonde FemmeFataleSpy called Ilse plays the FemmeFatale role, twice: on both occasions acting as agent for the dastardly villain, Count Erich von Stalhein of the German Intelligence Services.

to:

* AmbiguouslyGay: Although in the first WWI adventure it is implied that Biggles being had a fling with a French baronness/German FemmeFatale spy, by the end of the war, he seems to be completely disinterested in women and rather spends his time flying with 'the boys', Althoug this is handwaved by the fact that the Biggles stories are adventures primarily written for English schoolboys who at least their age were generally uninterested in girls as well, there are many instances that by a non-practicing gay dirty mind looking for clues can be inferred from interpreted as to indicate that there was something more going on between Biggles, his cousin Algie, his protegé Ginger, the books given a modern dirty mind. It fobbish sometines effeminate Bertie and even his German [[foeYayShipping favorite enemy Erich Von Stalhein]]
** The nicknames of Biggles companions being all more or less ambiguously tenderly male/female : Algie, Ginger, Bertie
** The fact that Algie is introduced as Biggles' ''cousin''
** In "The flight of the Condor", it is revealed that Biggles grew up in the house of his uncle Richard (which he calls 'Dick-pa'). Richard is unmarried but shares the house with his manservant.
** The team not only flies together and goes on secret missions together, they also on various occasions spend their holidays together, just the three (or four) of them without inviting anyone else, especially not any female acquaintances.
**It
is a verifiable detail that only ''one'' woman even came close to seducing Biggles away from the manly embrace of his chums. A blonde FemmeFataleSpy called Ilse plays the FemmeFatale role, twice: on both occasions acting as agent for the dastardly villain, Count Erich von Stalhein of the German Intelligence Services.Services.



** Averted with ''Ginger'' Hebblewaithe. although after WWII he marries a co-pilot's sister and becomes a father, his home life is only mentioned sparingly. Up to the last books, he remains the ''junior'' of the team.

to:

** Averted with ''Ginger'' Hebblewaithe. although after WWII he marries a co-pilot's sister and becomes a father, his home life is only mentioned sparingly. Up to the last books, he his spirit remains just as youthful and eager as in his first appearance as an 18-year old apprentice pilot.
* ChromosomeCasting: Justified in
the ''junior'' early novels as all characters are military pilots and mechanics... ergo male. However in the interwar civilian adventures and especially later in the postwar adventures of the team.'Air Police' female characters are barely present. As befits a line of stories primarily written for a boy's magazine, flying and crimefighting are exclusively male enterprises.


* ButtMonkey: Lord Bertram 'Bertie' Lissie. Going through the books, especially the post-war adventures for the 'Air Police' fans noted that of the four protagonists, Bertie always is the most likely to get shot, attacked, beaten or suffer some other unpleasantness on the hands of the adversaries. Yet, he does not seem to mind especially and always signs up for the next adventure.



* CharacterDevelopment: And not just for the ContractualPurity reasons mentioned above. Biggles becomes [[OlderAndWiser appreciably smarter and less hot-headed with age.]]

to:

* CharacterActionTitle: Almost all of the book titles start with the name 'Biggles'. Most titles then add an action ("Biggles flies east", "Biggles sweeps the desert", "Biggles smells a rat") although several titles follow the CharacterNameAndTheNounPhrase formula: "Biggles and..." ("Biggles and the black raider", Biggles and the pirate treasure"), "Biggles in..." ("Biggles in France", "...in Spain", "...in Mexico"... in the Blue", or "Biggles of...". Notably the third book published, a collection of short stories originally called "The Camel Squadron" was later reprinted as "'''Biggles of''' the Camel Squadron"
** this is parodied with several ''fake'' Biggles stories referenced in other books or media. Notably Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus has a sketch called "Biggles writes a letter" which at the end includes a commercial for the ''upcoming'' "Biggles Flies Undone" (Read aloud!)
* CharacterDevelopment: And not just for the ContractualPurity reasons mentioned above. Biggles becomes [[OlderAndWiser appreciably smarter and less hot-headed with age.]]]]. In the later albums '''Algie''' becomes the most worn-out, aged and war-weary character, often staying behind to guard the camp as his comrades go out exploring.
** Averted with ''Ginger'' Hebblewaithe. although after WWII he marries a co-pilot's sister and becomes a father, his home life is only mentioned sparingly. Up to the last books, he remains the ''junior'' of the team.



%%%%* ImprobablePilotingSkills: Displayed by all four Aces.

to:

%%%%* * HiddenBadass: Lord Bertram Lissie ("Bertie"). When first introduced, he joins the 666th squadron as Biggles' second officer. Although he does his best to come over as a fobbish British lordling, he already wears a Distinguished Flying Cross on his uniform. Over the course of the war adventures, Bertie goes out of his way to appear as the CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass by displaying a series of funny, fobish antics, such as his obsession with always wearing a monocle. However in the air, he takes charge and rescues Biggles from being shot down more than once. Later (in "Biggles takes charge", Ginger remarks offhandedly that during the war Bertie managed to down 32 enemy aircraft)
*
ImprobablePilotingSkills: Displayed by all four Aces.

Added DiffLines:

* TheDarknessBeforeDeath: In "The Decoy", [[spoiler:the dying pilot Batson's last words are ''"It's getting - devilish - dark - Biggles - devilish - dark -"'']]


* AccidentNoMurder: In one of the later short stories, the veteran pilot, now a policeman, is asked for his opinion on the death of a girl who had previously had an argument with her pilot boyfriend. She was hit on the head with a blunt instrument and died instantly. The boyfriend is being sought. Biggles reviews the case. The girl was found dead in her garden with no signs of intrusion or struggle. No weapon has been recovered. However, in the photographs is an unopened box of chocolates. Biggles asks about this. It has been disregarded by the police as of no significance, incidental. He asks if this was kept, and discovers one corner of the box is badly crushed out of shape. Then it becomes clear. The pilot boyfriend sought to make up the row with a romantic gesture, dropping a box of chocolates to her in her garden from several hundred feet up. He just aimed too well. Biggles notes it would be like hitting her with a brick, and points to people being killed in the wars by shrapnel, parts of damaged aircraft, or even spent bullet cases dropping from the air. The case now becomes not murder, but death by misadventure.

to:

* AccidentNoMurder: AccidentNotMurder: In one of the later short stories, the veteran pilot, now a policeman, is asked for his opinion on the death of a girl who had previously had an argument with her pilot boyfriend. She was hit on the head with a blunt instrument and died instantly. The boyfriend is being sought. Biggles reviews the case. The girl was found dead in her garden with no signs of intrusion or struggle. No weapon has been recovered. However, in the photographs is an unopened box of chocolates. Biggles asks about this. It has been disregarded by the police as of no significance, incidental. He asks if this was kept, and discovers one corner of the box is badly crushed out of shape. Then it becomes clear. The pilot boyfriend sought to make up the row with a romantic gesture, dropping a box of chocolates to her in her garden from several hundred feet up. He just aimed too well. Biggles notes it would be like hitting her with a brick, and points to people being killed in the wars by shrapnel, parts of damaged aircraft, or even spent bullet cases dropping from the air. The case now becomes not murder, but death by misadventure.

Added DiffLines:

* AccidentNoMurder: In one of the later short stories, the veteran pilot, now a policeman, is asked for his opinion on the death of a girl who had previously had an argument with her pilot boyfriend. She was hit on the head with a blunt instrument and died instantly. The boyfriend is being sought. Biggles reviews the case. The girl was found dead in her garden with no signs of intrusion or struggle. No weapon has been recovered. However, in the photographs is an unopened box of chocolates. Biggles asks about this. It has been disregarded by the police as of no significance, incidental. He asks if this was kept, and discovers one corner of the box is badly crushed out of shape. Then it becomes clear. The pilot boyfriend sought to make up the row with a romantic gesture, dropping a box of chocolates to her in her garden from several hundred feet up. He just aimed too well. Biggles notes it would be like hitting her with a brick, and points to people being killed in the wars by shrapnel, parts of damaged aircraft, or even spent bullet cases dropping from the air. The case now becomes not murder, but death by misadventure.


* OnlyAFleshWound: Frequently invoked. In one egregious example, Ginger is shot through the thigh but still manages to outrun his pursuers for over a mile.

to:

* OnlyAFleshWound: Frequently invoked. In one egregious example, Ginger is shot through the thigh but still manages to outrun his pursuers for over a mile. his faithful chums locate him by follwing the TrailOfBlood.


* AcePilot: The whole point.

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* %%%%* AcePilot: The whole point.The



* BadassGrandpa: Biggles ages naturally during the course of the books. His last excursion as an over-age and deniable James Bond is a mission into the Russian Gulag in 1965, when he would have been as old as the century, to liberate old antagonist Erich von Stalhein from Soviet incarceration.



* ImprobablePilotingSkills: Displayed by all four Aces.

to:

* %%%%* ImprobablePilotingSkills: Displayed by all four Aces.


Added DiffLines:

* OldSoldier: Biggles ages naturally during the course of the books. His last excursion as an over-age and deniable James Bond is a mission into the Russian Gulag in 1965, when he would have been as old as the century, to liberate old antagonist Erich von Stalhein from Soviet incarceration.

Added DiffLines:

* CharacterDevelopment: And not just for the ContractualPurity reasons mentioned above. Biggles becomes [[OlderAndWiser appreciably smarter and less hot-headed with age.]]


[[caption-width-right:350:''Biggles of the Camel Squadron. The third book in the series, but the first to feature the name "Biggles" in the title- all subsequent books would use it.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''Biggles of the Camel Squadron.Squadron''. The third book in the series, but the first to feature the name "Biggles" in the title- all subsequent books would use it.]]

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/biggles.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:''Biggles of the Camel Squadron. The third book in the series, but the first to feature the name "Biggles" in the title- all subsequent books would use it.]]

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