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* Any non main spirits that fall in battle in ''VisualNovel/EienNoAselia'' are killed off. Main spirits result in a game over. On the first playthrough, Kouin and Kyouko are killed off and can be in later playthroughs as well if you don't do the third chapter exactly right.


* Zato-1 from ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear''. His voice actor died, and they didn't want to use anyone else for the character, so they killed him off. Doesn't stop people from saying he should return. Conveniently, his character story involved being menaced by a psychic parasite he gained as part of a bargain to trade his eyesight for power, so they had said parasite kill him and take over his body, writing him out of the story but keeping his moveset and sprite in the game.
** The death of this same voice actor (Creator/KanetoShiozawa) also necessitated the killing off of another his characters, ''VideoGame/RivalSchools''' Hyo Imawano at the end of ''Project Justice''.

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* Zato-1 from ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear''. His original voice actor died, and they didn't want to use anyone else for the character, so they killed him off. Doesn't stop people from saying he should return.off. Conveniently, his character story involved being menaced by a psychic parasite he gained as part of a bargain to trade his eyesight for power, so they had said parasite kill him and take over his body, writing him out of the story but keeping his moveset and sprite in the game.
** The death of this same voice actor (Creator/KanetoShiozawa) also necessitated [[TheCharacterDiedWithHim the killing off of another of his characters, characters]], ''VideoGame/RivalSchools''' Hyo Imawano at the end of ''Project Justice''.


** This also applies to all {{Big Bad}}s who are not Robotnik, Chaos or Metal Sonic.


** Kodlak Whitemane and Skjor are both killed during the course of the Companions questline. (The Dragonborn can still encounter Kodlak's soul, however, if this is done before the main questline.)
** This is the fate of any dragon killed by the player character. A regular individual who slays a dragon merely sends it into a sort of dormant state, and it can be brought back to life by Alduin (which is exactly what's happening in the game). But the Dragonborn absorbs the dragon's soul when they kill it, meaning that it can never be revived by any means. Alduin is the only exception; killing him to resolve the main questline merely banishes him, and he will be reborn when Akatosh intends it.

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** *** Kodlak Whitemane and Skjor are both killed during the course of the Companions questline. (The Dragonborn can still encounter Kodlak's soul, however, if this is done before the main questline.)
** *** This is the fate of any dragon killed by the player character. A regular individual who slays a dragon merely sends it into a sort of dormant state, and it can be brought back to life by Alduin (which is exactly what's happening in the game). But the Dragonborn absorbs the dragon's soul when they kill it, meaning that it can never be revived by any means. Alduin is the only exception; killing him to resolve the main questline merely banishes him, and he will be reborn when Akatosh intends it.


*** The leader and chief lieutenant of the losing side in the CivilWar questline are killed off for real. For Ulfric, Galmar, and Rikke, their spirits can be encountered in [[WarriorHeaven Sovngarde]], confirming their deaths.
*** Emperor Titus Mede II is killed at the conclusion of the [[MurderInc Dark Brotherhood]] questline.


** Assuming that whenever Ganondorf is reincarnated, he remains the exact same person instead of a new Ganon: In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'', Ganon gives up on reincarnation to immediately resurrect in a powerful (but slow) form of pure malice. Thus, when Zelda disintegrates him with her magic, he is gone for good this time. Which is fitting considering how big this particular game is. (Some may argue he was sealed away, but the final memory shows her divine power is more powerful than sealing magic since she kills Guardians with it, plus there are various other hints including the title of the "''Destroy'' Ganon" quest)


* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'', this is highly implied to be the case with Ganondorf, as he hasn't appeared in any of the ''Wind Waker'' timeline sequels, only being a mere mention.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'', this is highly implied to be the case with Ganondorf, as he hasn't appeared who was [[RasputinianDeath stabbed through the forehead with the Master Sword, turned to stone, and buried at the bottom of the ocean]]. He didn't appear in any of the ''Wind Waker'' timeline sequels, and was only being a mere mention.mentioned.


* ''Mutant Football League'', the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mutant League Football'' below, has a less severe version of this in Season mode. While killed players are unusable for the rest of the game, wins earn you a handful of revivals for dead players should you choose to use them -- AntiFrustrationFeatures for the 16+ game slog. There are also "Expendable" players at the bottom of the depth chart who are automatically resurrected between games if killed, to ensure you can always field a team. This results in a surprisingly strategic ploy for an arcade-style football game, figuratively burying Star Players in your depth chart and wearing down your foes [[ThePawnsGoFirst with your Expendables]] before literally burying them with your fresh and eager for blood Stars.

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* ''Mutant Football League'', the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mutant League Football'' below, has a less severe version of this in Season mode. While killed players are unusable for the rest of the game, wins earn you a handful of revivals for dead players should you choose to use them revives -- AntiFrustrationFeatures for the 16+ 13+ game slog. There are also "Expendable" players at the bottom of the depth chart who are automatically resurrected between games if killed, to ensure you can always field a team. This results in a surprisingly strategic ploy for an arcade-style football game, figuratively burying Star Players in your depth chart and wearing down your foes [[ThePawnsGoFirst with your Expendables]] before literally burying them with your fresh and eager for blood Stars.


* In both ''Mutant League Football'' and ''Mutant League Hockey'', this is part of playing with Reserves on. With Reserves off, players who are killed will be good as new at the start of the next play (MLF) or at the next stoppage of the game (MLH). With reserves off, players who die stay dead -- meaning that if your star player dies in the first round of the playoffs, you can never use him again in that playthrough. The tradeoff is that with reserves on, you can make substitutions at your discretion. This encourages strategy in what players you field, and several teams have good players on the bench who can't be used with reserves off anyway.

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* In both ''Mutant League Football'' and ''Mutant League Hockey'', this is part of playing with Reserves on. With Reserves off, players who are killed will be good as new at the start of the next play (MLF) or at the next stoppage of the game (MLH). With reserves off, on, players who die stay dead -- meaning that if your star player dies in the first round of the playoffs, you can never use him again in that playthrough. The tradeoff is that with reserves on, you can make substitutions at your discretion. This encourages strategy in what players you field, and several teams have good players on the bench who can't be used with reserves off anyway.


* ''Mutant Football League'', the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mutant League Football'' below, has a less severe version of this in Season mode. While killed players are unusable for the rest of the game, wins earn you a handful of revivals for dead players should you choose to use them -- AntiFrustrationFeatures for the 16+ game slog. There are also "Expendable" players at the bottom of the depth chart who are automatically resurrected between games if killed, to ensure you can always field a team.

to:

* ''Mutant Football League'', the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mutant League Football'' below, has a less severe version of this in Season mode. While killed players are unusable for the rest of the game, wins earn you a handful of revivals for dead players should you choose to use them -- AntiFrustrationFeatures for the 16+ game slog. There are also "Expendable" players at the bottom of the depth chart who are automatically resurrected between games if killed, to ensure you can always field a team. This results in a surprisingly strategic ploy for an arcade-style football game, figuratively burying Star Players in your depth chart and wearing down your foes [[ThePawnsGoFirst with your Expendables]] before literally burying them with your fresh and eager for blood Stars.

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** Assuming that whenever Ganondorf is reincarnated, he remains the exact same person instead of a new Ganon: In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'', Ganon gives up on reincarnation to immediately resurrect in a powerful (but slow) form of pure malice. Thus, when Zelda disintegrates him with her magic, he is gone for good this time. Which is fitting considering how big this particular game is. (Some may argue he was sealed away, but the final memory shows her divine power is more powerful than sealing magic since she kills Guardians with it, plus there are various other hints including the title of the "''Destroy'' Ganon" quest)


* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' has flip-flopped on this repeatedly. The first game almost everyone dead stays dead. The second game undoes the deaths of [[spoiler: Junko (via her AI) and Alter Ego (Chihiro's AI), only for them to both die for real again soon after.]] Meanwhile [[spoiler: none of the students that die in the second game are actually dead.]]

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* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' ''{{Franchise/Danganronpa}}'' has flip-flopped on this repeatedly. The first game almost everyone dead stays dead. The second game undoes the deaths of [[spoiler: Junko (via her AI) and Alter Ego (Chihiro's AI), only for them to both die for real again soon after.]] Meanwhile [[spoiler: none of the students that die in the second game are actually dead.]]


* ''Mutant Football League'', the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mutant League Football'' below, has a less severe version of this in Season mode. While killed players are unusable for the rest of the game, wins earn you a handful of revivals for dead players ahould you choose to use them -- AntiFrustrationFeatures for the 16+ game slog. There are also "Expendable" players at the bottom of the depth chart who are automatically resurrected between games if killed, to ensure you can always field a team.

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** ''VideoGame/MortalKombat11'' kicks off with the death of Sonya Blade in a HeroicSacrifice before time travel shenanigans get involved, resulting in past versions of the previous Mortal Kombatants being pulled from time to the present era. Among the casualties this time are Kano, who gets a double-dose of death when Past Sonya puts one through Past Kano's eye, Shao Kahn is killed by Kitana in final vengeance for her family, and Hanzo Hasashi, the present Scorpion, is killed by D'Vorah.
* ''Mutant Football League'', the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mutant League Football'' below, has a less severe version of this in Season mode. While killed players are unusable for the rest of the game, wins earn you a handful of revivals for dead players ahould should you choose to use them -- AntiFrustrationFeatures for the 16+ game slog. There are also "Expendable" players at the bottom of the depth chart who are automatically resurrected between games if killed, to ensure you can always field a team.


** In the sequel, it seems that Blizzard has managed to do just this without ruining the canon. Tassadar comes back just long enough to warn Zeratul of the impending apocalypse in the capacity that Obi-wan does in ''StarWars'', as a sort of Force ghost, or Khala ghost, as it may be.

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** In the sequel, it seems that Blizzard has managed to do just this without ruining the canon. Tassadar comes back just long enough to warn Zeratul of the impending apocalypse in the capacity that Obi-wan does in ''StarWars'', ''Franchise/StarWars'', as a sort of Force ghost, or Khala ghost, as it may be.


* In ''VideoGame/{{Mass Effect|1}}'', on Virmire, Shepard has to leave either Kaidan or Ashley behind as a nuke goes off. Wrex can be killed earlier in the mission if you fail to secure his loyalty. [[WordOfGod BioWare has explicitly said]] that the dead party member(s) will not return in the sequels, potentially solidifying the series' listing under this trope.

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* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
**
In ''VideoGame/{{Mass Effect|1}}'', on Virmire, Shepard has to leave either Kaidan or Ashley behind as a nuke goes off. Wrex can be killed earlier in the mission if you fail to secure his loyalty. [[WordOfGod BioWare has explicitly said]] that the dead party member(s) will not return in the sequels, potentially solidifying the series' listing under this trope.



* ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|SonsOfLiberty}}'' has a character named Vamp who, no matter how many times he'd seemingly "die," he always comes back to life. ''Metal Gear Solid 4'' explained this as a result of nanomachines enhancing his already powerful healing factor, and once Snake disables them with a syringe, Raiden is able to kill him off for good.

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':
**
''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|SonsOfLiberty}}'' has a character named Vamp who, no matter how many times he'd seemingly "die," he always comes back to life. ''Metal Gear Solid 4'' explained this as a result of nanomachines enhancing his already powerful healing factor, and once Snake disables them with a syringe, Raiden is able to kill him off for good.

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