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'''Squiddy:''' I bet he's the one who kidnapped [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses the princess]].\\

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'''Squiddy:''' I bet he's the one who kidnapped [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses [[SaveThePrincess the princess]].\\

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** A flashback in ReMIND both explains his reasoning and shows the gaping hole in it that he always ignores. Xehanort is convinced that people's hearts are inherently weak; accusing their light of being a farce, he claims that they repeatedly steal power from each other and delude themselves into thinking they've earned it, using "hollow reasons as justification", and would plunge the whole World into chaos with their uncontrolled darkness if they kept this up. His solution was to become the master of darkness itself, purge all those weak hearts and their false lights, and harness the original light of Kingdom Hearts to maintain order in the new, empty world. Given what he apparently witnessed on his world tour, it's an understandable world-view... but then he arbitrarily decides that his OWN heart is somehow different, and over the course of the next 75 years does EXACTLY what he'd accused all those "weak-hearted" people of doing. Why? Because he can sense where he's meant to go and what he's supposed to do. StableTimeLoop or not, this is far from a rational basis for a decision, and one gets the impression that his whole worldview was partially created by projecting his OWN flaws on everyone else.



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* The whole setting is full of this in ''VideoGame/TheOuterWorlds'' thanks to OneNationUnderCopyright and everyone being completely indoctrinated in corporate loyalty. For example, at one point you can overhear a conversation between two workers about a third worker being gone. He was the guy who made the wanted posters for Phineas Welles. Corporate security had orders to round up anyone with a connection to Welles. Making the wanted posters is "a connection." Both of the workers think this was brilliant.


* In ''[[VideoGame/TouchDetective Touch Detective 3]]'', Inspector Daria and Mackenzie are both stumped as to why someone has been going around the town stealing nothing but people's bananas. Inspector Daria suddenly "reasons" that, because the thief stole everyone's bananas the thief must not have respect for people who like bananas, and because a sentient Banana-Man would naturally like bananas, the thief's objective is absolutely not to use their stolen Bananas to make a sentient Banana-Man. Mackenzie is absolutely bewildered by this. [[spoiler:The irony is that Inspector Daria's logic is also an inverted BatDeduction, as the thief's objective actually ''is'' to make a sentient Banana-Man.]]
* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. Combine that with the insane, non-intuitive nature of needing to accuse the character of hiding the rape; and if that isn't enough, add on the fact that the game also throws in a far more decisive and less theory-based incorrect red herring evidence that could very easily also show something that the character is hiding about their friend, and you've got an answer that expects a player to completely abandon all sense of rational logic to understand what the game is expecting them to answer it with. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part incorrect and that figure only drops to just over 90% for players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options. One can only wonder how the developers thought this was a good idea, and moreover, how this mess of a question got past past play-testing.[[/note]]



* In ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' you would think that [[BigBad Hazama]], [[MadScientist Kokonoe]], [[KnightTemplar Jin Kisaragi]], or even [[TheDragon Relius Clover]] could be capable of this it's really [[GoneHorriblyWrong Lotte Carmine]] and [[AndIMustScream Ada Clover]] (the latter to a small extent).

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* In ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' you would think that [[BigBad Hazama]], [[MadScientist Kokonoe]], [[KnightTemplar Jin Kisaragi]], or even [[TheDragon Relius Clover]] could be capable of this it's really [[GoneHorriblyWrong Lotte Carmine]] (who admittedly actually is insane) and [[AndIMustScream Ada Clover]] (the latter to a small extent).


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* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. Combine that with the insane, non-intuitive nature of needing to accuse the character of hiding the rape; and if that isn't enough, add on the fact that the game also throws in a far more decisive and less theory-based incorrect red herring evidence that could very easily also show something that the character is hiding about their friend, and you've got an answer that expects a player to completely abandon all sense of rational logic to understand what the game is expecting them to answer it with. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part incorrect and that figure only drops to just over 90% for players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options. One can only wonder how the developers thought this was a good idea, and moreover, how this mess of a question got past past play-testing.[[/note]]


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* In ''[[VideoGame/TouchDetective Touch Detective 3]]'', Inspector Daria and Mackenzie are both stumped as to why someone has been going around the town stealing nothing but people's bananas. Inspector Daria suddenly "reasons" that, because the thief stole everyone's bananas the thief must not have respect for people who like bananas, and because a sentient Banana-Man would naturally like bananas, the thief's objective is absolutely not to use their stolen Bananas to make a sentient Banana-Man. Mackenzie is absolutely bewildered by this. [[spoiler:The irony is that Inspector Daria's logic is also an inverted BatDeduction, as the thief's objective actually ''is'' to make a sentient Banana-Man.]]


* In ''[[VideoGame/TouchDetective Touch Dective 3]]'', Inspector Daria and Mackenzie are both stumped as to why someone has been going around the town stealing nothing but people's bananas. Inspector Daria suddenly "reasons" that, because the thief stole everyone's bananas the thief must not have respect for people who like bananas, and because a sentient Banana-Man would naturally like bananas, the thief's objective is absolutely not to use their stolen Bananas to make a sentient Banana-Man. Mackenzie is absolutely bewildered by this. [[spoiler:The irony is that Inspector Daria's logic is also an inverted BatDeduction, as the thief's objective actually ''is'' to make a sentient Banana-Man.]]

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* In ''[[VideoGame/TouchDetective Touch Dective Detective 3]]'', Inspector Daria and Mackenzie are both stumped as to why someone has been going around the town stealing nothing but people's bananas. Inspector Daria suddenly "reasons" that, because the thief stole everyone's bananas the thief must not have respect for people who like bananas, and because a sentient Banana-Man would naturally like bananas, the thief's objective is absolutely not to use their stolen Bananas to make a sentient Banana-Man. Mackenzie is absolutely bewildered by this. [[spoiler:The irony is that Inspector Daria's logic is also an inverted BatDeduction, as the thief's objective actually ''is'' to make a sentient Banana-Man.]]


* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'', GreaterScopeVillain Master Xehanort wants to bring full-on [[BalanceBetweenGoodAndEvil Balance Between Light and Darkness]] to all Worlds. So throughout the series (both directly and via proxies), he performs countless BlackMagic experiments and ComplexityAddiction-y schemes that clearly benefit only the Realm of Darkness while simultaneously harming the Realm of Light. Never mind the fact that said Worlds, being in the Realm of Light, are naturally Light-leaning anyway.

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* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'', GreaterScopeVillain Master Xehanort wants to bring full-on [[BalanceBetweenGoodAndEvil Balance Between Light and Darkness]] to all Worlds. So throughout the series (both directly and via proxies), by proxy), he performs countless BlackMagic experiments and ComplexityAddiction-y ComplexityAddiction schemes that clearly benefit only the Realm of Darkness while simultaneously harming the Realm of Light. Never mind the fact that said Worlds, being in the Realm of Light, are naturally Light-leaning anyway.

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* ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxHitTheRoad'' wouldn't be a '90s puzzle-adventure game without a few moments of this, such as:
** Combining a severed hand, a broken golf ball retriever, and a fridge magnet to create a device to extract a mood ring from the world's largest ball of twine;
** Using a wrench to loosen a giant ceramic fish so that you can crawl into it and be mistaken for a real fish by a fisherman literally five feet away from you who saw you do all of this, so that you can be stolen from his pile of caught fish by a helicopter pilot who ALSO mistakes your giant fake fish for a real fish, so that you can be dropped onto (sigh) ''the same goddamn giant ball of twine'' in order to snip 91 yards of twine off of it.


* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has a rather jarring one. Garrosh Hellscream deliberately infests his men with the [[EldritchAbomination Sha]] in the belief that they'll somehow conquer the Sha and become stronger. When all of them succumb including his champion, he tells Anduin Wrynn (who had been trying to convince him what a bad idea it was) that [[NeverMyFault he cost Garrosh a mighty warrior]] and [[spoiler:almost]] kills him. [[spoiler:Granted, he turns out to have some more successful attempts later, including his own [[TheDragon right-hand man]], Malkorok, and he himself ends up wielding the power of the Heart of Y'Shaarj itself.]]
** Also there is the concentration camp in Hilssbrad Foothills. The guy who runs it is completely crazy and thinks that humans are plants. Despite actually being a human himself (an undead one, but still definitely a human). He's got a bunch of humans "planted" up to their necks in goodness-only-knows what sort of soil. You have the choice to either kill them or dig them up, before taking out the wackjob in charge. He also thinks that his flesh golem is definitely invincible even though he also says moments earlier that flesh is disgustingly weak. Of course, this might have something to do with the [[EldritchAbomination Old God]] that is revealed many expansions later to be nearby.

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* In ''VideoGame/DungeonMunchies'', the extremely talented necromancer Simmer became interested and equally skilled in cooking upon realizing the similarities between the two disciplines. In her words, you're taking something that's dead, taking parts of it, then infusing it with hellfire and magic to create something new and useful.


* The St. John family in ''VideoGame/TheWalkingDead'' are revealed to be [[spoiler: cannibals. When Lee discovers Mark and his missing legs, he confronts the family about it. Their response? The walkers do nothing but eat everything, so it's up to humans to make sure things do not go to waste by eating people themselves when they die. The problem with that logic is Mark was previously shot in the shoulder with an arrow and was in no danger of dying at all. Before Lee or his group can question the family further, they take Lee's group as hostages.]]

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* The St. John family in ''VideoGame/TheWalkingDead'' are revealed to be [[spoiler: cannibals. When Lee discovers Mark and his missing legs, he confronts the family about it. Their response? The walkers do nothing but eat everything, so it's up to humans to make sure things do not go to waste by eating people themselves when they die. The problem with that logic is Mark was previously shot in the shoulder with an arrow and was in no danger of dying at all.all, and they had to butcher him alive because zombie meat is poison. Before Lee or his group can question the family further, they take Lee's group as hostages.]]

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* In ''[[VideoGame/TouchDetective Touch Dective 3]]'', Inspector Daria and Mackenzie are both stumped as to why someone has been going around the town stealing nothing but people's bananas. Inspector Daria suddenly "reasons" that, because the thief stole everyone's bananas the thief must not have respect for people who like bananas, and because a sentient Banana-Man would naturally like bananas, the thief's objective is absolutely not to use their stolen Bananas to make a sentient Banana-Man. Mackenzie is absolutely bewildered by this. [[spoiler:The irony is that Inspector Daria's logic is also an inverted BatDeduction, as the thief's objective actually ''is'' to make a sentient Banana-Man.]]


* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part incorrect and that figure only drops to just over 90% for players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options.[[/note]]

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* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. Combine that with the insane, non-intuitive nature of needing to accuse the character of hiding the rape; and if that isn't enough, add on the fact that the game also throws in a far more decisive and less theory-based incorrect red herring evidence that could very easily also show something that the character is hiding about their friend, and you've got an answer that expects a player to completely abandon all sense of rational logic to understand what the game is expecting them to answer it with. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part incorrect and that figure only drops to just over 90% for players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options. One can only wonder how the developers thought this was a good idea, and moreover, how this mess of a question got past past play-testing.[[/note]]


* Early on in ''VideoGame/GhostTrick'', Sissel discovers that the ghost of the recently deceased dog Missile has tagged along with him into the past to prevent his death. Missile doesn't bat an eye at such a feat, reasoning that if his master can walk on two feet and he can't, he shouldn't find it weird that Sissel can walk through time and he can't. The worst part? ''Sissel agrees with his line of reasoning.''
** Although animals and humans are capable of communicating with each other in the ghost world, their knowledge about the world is vastly different, resulting in Missile drawing this absurd conclusion. Justified as it turns out that [[spoiler:Sissel was a cat all along who mistakenly assumed a human identity]].

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* Early on in ''VideoGame/GhostTrick'', Sissel discovers that the ghost of the recently deceased dog Missile has tagged along with him into the past to prevent his death. Missile doesn't bat an eye at such a feat, reasoning that if his master can walk on two feet and he can't, he shouldn't find it weird that Sissel can walk through time and he can't. The worst part? ''Sissel agrees with his line of reasoning.''
**
Although animals and humans are capable of communicating with each other in the ghost world, their knowledge about the world is vastly different, resulting in Missile drawing expressing thought patterns that seem like this absurd conclusion. Justified as it turns out that [[spoiler:Sissel was a cat all along who mistakenly assumed a human identity]].to us but are actually [[SubvertedTrope standard or even times clever thinking by the standards of an animal]].


* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part correct and that figure only drops to just over 90% when you only include players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options.[[/note]]

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* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part correct incorrect and that figure only drops to just over 90% when you only include for players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options.[[/note]]

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* In ''VideoGame/LANoire'', Cole accuses someone of hiding the fact that their friend was raped because when Cole asked her to describe her friend she didn't mention the fact that they were raped. This is made worse by the fact that the player needs to think to do this themselves during this character's interview, something which is highly non-intuitive for more reasons then just the insane nature of the accusation.[[note]]By this point the rape is pure speculation based on rip panties found in the friend's handbag and Cole assuming it to be proof that it did happen is close a BatDeduction. Nevertheless the game is expecting the player to be on the same boat as Cole without any prompting, and thus, is expected to have the rape theory on hand as apparent proof. By official game statistics (which are logged by the game's online Social Club) ''close to 99%'' of all first time players get this part correct and that figure only drops to just over 90% when you only include players who have already used an in-game "intuition point" to narrow down their answer options.[[/note]]

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