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** Can be considered a deconstruction of the trope. [[spoiler:Aegon]] is a stand-in for the stereotypical fantasy heroes who become great rulers because they grew up in a simple life. Never mind that they completely lack the training and experience to be even remotely competent. Demonstrated in [[spoiler:Aegon's]] case by the fact that [[spoiler:Tyrion]] manipulates him with ease.

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** Thufir was actually surprised by Jessica's Voice ability and seemed to be unaware that something like that was possible. Despite the fact that she had been training Paul to use it. Also, Gurney was aware of it and had been trained to resist it. Thufir seems to be completely oblivious.

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** At least partially justified in that cleverness in a society lady was measured by her ability to make witty remarks and discuss issues like lterature, theatre, and poetry, rather than actual intelligence.


* In ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

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* In ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created. Of course, he's also something of an UnreliableNarrator.


** Thrawn in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is a good example of ''why'' this happens. He's supposed to be a brilliant tactician, but most of those writing him aren't tactical experts, so they must either leave his abilities vague, show him outwitting the protagonist [[YouAreTooLate in nontactical ways]], or give his opponents an IdiotBall. Later appearances rectify this.

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** Thrawn in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is a good example of ''why'' this happens. He's supposed to be a brilliant tactician, but most of those writing him aren't tactical experts, so they must either leave his abilities vague, show him outwitting the protagonist [[YouAreTooLate in nontactical ways]], or give his opponents an IdiotBall. Later appearances rectify this. Even in his [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy original appearance]] it was a major plot point that his abilities were massively overblown in-universe; he was good, but looked better simply because his predecessors had been complete jokes.


* In "Literature/Frankenstein", the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

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* In "Literature/Frankenstein", ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.


* Alistair [=MacLean's=] (actually John Denis) ''Air Force One Is Down'' goes to great detail describing master thief (now secret agent) Sabrina and how good she is, then portrays her as a classic DamselInDistress throughout the rest of the book. Most notably in a scene where Sabrina can't lie to the BigBad because she can't keep her thoughts off her face (and she's supposed to be a former ''criminal''???)

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* Alistair [=MacLean's=] (actually John Denis) ''Air Force One Is Down'' goes to great detail describing master thief (now secret agent) Sabrina and how good she is, then portrays her as a classic DamselInDistress throughout the rest of the book. Most notably in a scene where Sabrina can't lie to the BigBad because she can't keep her thoughts off her face (and she's supposed to be a former ''criminal''???)master thief whose ability to deceive others is specifically discussed at the start of the novel).


* In "Literature/Frankenstein, the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

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* In "Literature/Frankenstein, "Literature/Frankenstein", the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

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** Can be considered a deconstruction of the trope. [[spoiler:Aegon]] is a stand-in for the stereotypical fantasy heroes who become great rulers because they grew up in a simple life. Never mind that they completely lack the training and experience to be even remotely competent. Demonstrated in [[spoiler:Aegon's]] case by the fact that [[spoiler:Tyrion]] manipulates him with ease.

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* In "Literature/Frankenstein, the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.


** ''Breaking Dawn'' also describes the Volturi as selfish tyrants who use their powers and flimsy excuses to justify killing vampires and having ones they find useful press-ganged into their service. When the Volturi actually show up to verify that [[spoiler:Renesmee]] is not a threat, they're generally quite reasonable and listen to the Cullens' side of the story, [[spoiler:ultimately leaving in peace when it turns out Renesmee can grow up without revealing the existence of vampires to the world]]. (The movie does offer some ulterior motives in this, in that [[spoiler:Aro only decides to leave after Alice shows him a vision of the results of a Cullen vs. Volturi battle, which involves Bella and Edward ripping his head off and setting him on fire.]]) Additionally, the laws the Volturi holds all vampires to are hardly unreasonable and mostly consist of "don't let humans find out about us" and "don't create murderous vampire children", laws which actually protect both vampires (safety from human-made advanced weaponry) and humans (safety from vampire empires where humans are cattle or slaves).

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** ''Breaking Dawn'' also describes the Volturi as selfish tyrants who use their powers and flimsy excuses to justify killing vampires and having ones they find useful press-ganged into their service. When the Volturi actually show up to verify that [[spoiler:Renesmee]] is not a threat, they're generally quite reasonable and listen to the Cullens' side of the story, [[spoiler:ultimately leaving in peace when it turns out Renesmee can grow up without revealing the existence of vampires to the world]]. (The movie does offer (There is some ulterior motives in this, in that [[spoiler:Aro only decides to leave after Alice shows him a vision of the results of a Cullen vs. Volturi battle, which involves Bella and Edward ripping his head off and setting him on fire.]]) Additionally, the laws the Volturi holds all vampires to are hardly unreasonable and mostly consist of "don't let humans find out about us" and "don't create murderous vampire children", laws which actually protect both vampires (safety from human-made advanced weaponry) and humans (safety from vampire empires where humans are cattle or slaves).


** Given that this is ''A Song of Ice and Fire'', this is probably an invoked or at least consciously used trope. It also shows up when we hear endless praise of the Tyrell contender for the throne (only for him to end up being as petty as any of them) or when the small mountain of prophecy and overwrought praise directed at Daenerys seems to actually be panning out for a book (and then she turns into a petty and incompetent ruler driven by whims and eventually just walks away from her responsibilities in later books). The illusions of the commoners and the artistocrats themselves regarding the ruling class contrasting starkly with reality is a running theme.
** One of the major themes of A Song of Ice and Fire that tends to make it stand out from most other novels is the actual Aversion of this trope. Just because a ''character'' describes another character as being X, doesn't really mean that the character ''is'' X, only that they believe that. This is contrast to most other authors using characters describing one another as shorthand for "this is how the readers should understand that character". Usually, exceptions to this statement are for when the character or audience will shortly realize that the first impression was false, such as Snape being the villain of the first Harry Potter book, or when the characters are so obviously biased the readers immediately know to discount the description. Martin makes this more complicated for the reader when the characters make statements that ''sound'' reasonable at first, but it's not the whole story. Examples would include the very first chapter introducing the Night's Watch where the common-born Gared is an experienced ranger and dismissive of the aristocratic and haughty Ser Waymar Royce. Reading a little deeper reveals that while Ser Royce *is* a jerk, he actually shows more reason than the overly cautious Gared and Will, and goes down in a valiant fight against the Others. Despite the fact that Will was in the end *correct* about wanting to turn back, Ser Waymar showed more reasonable logic for the knowledge they had at the time. Similar examples cross-examine the common wisdom of Ned and/or Robb being too *honorable*, or that Tywin being an harsh but effective leader. Information Asymmetry is of the other common themes in the book, and the reader is expected to look beyond glib explanations as to what is really going on.


* ''The Voice of Freedom'', prequel novel to the video game ''{{Homefront}}'', presents a particularly blatant example of this trope. Ben, the novel's protagonist, is described throughout the novel as a smart reporter whose talents were wasted on celebrities and pop culture before the US was invaded by an implausibly reunified Korea, and then as an inspiring public speaker after the invasion, using his rousing patriotic speeches to raise morale among Americans and infuriate the Koreans. The problem is that he is a terrible writer (coincidentally, so are the novel's two co-authors) and his "rousing speeches" on the radio are vacuous crap. Seriously, one of them ends with him shouting "Hell yeah!" repeatedly. Um... yeah...

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* ''The Voice of Freedom'', prequel novel to the video game ''{{Homefront}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Homefront}}'', presents a particularly blatant example of this trope. Ben, the novel's protagonist, is described throughout the novel as a smart reporter whose talents were wasted on celebrities and pop culture before the US was invaded by an implausibly reunified Korea, and then as an inspiring public speaker after the invasion, using his rousing patriotic speeches to raise morale among Americans and infuriate the Koreans. The problem is that he is a terrible writer (coincidentally, so are the novel's two co-authors) and his "rousing speeches" on the radio are vacuous crap. Seriously, one of them ends with him shouting "Hell yeah!" repeatedly. Um... yeah...


* This DorothyParker quote comes from her review of a largely forgotten novel called ''Debonair'' by G. B. Stern. The title "debonair" supposedly refers to the "charming" lead character, whose debonair charm seems to consist solely of speaking in a cutesy accent

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* This DorothyParker Creator/DorothyParker quote comes from her review of a largely forgotten novel called ''Debonair'' by G. B. Stern. The title "debonair" supposedly refers to the "charming" lead character, whose debonair charm seems to consist solely of speaking in a cutesy accent



'''DorothyParker''', "These Much Too Charming People"

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'''DorothyParker''', '''Dorothy Parker''', "These Much Too Charming People"

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** Perhaps more of an informed trait, but Bella repeatedly informs us that Edward speaks like a turn-of-the-century novel. Assuming she means the turn from the 1800s to the 1900s, which would seem reasonable given that he is born in 1901, he still speaks quite normally for the time he's in the mid to late 00's, when the books are taking place.

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