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* ''Series/BreakingBad'' may be one of the only times this is portrayed negatively. Walter White, the AntiHero, declines money from his very wealthy former friend to pay for his cancer treatment, opting instead to cook meth. He does this out of {{Pride}} as the money comes from the company that he co-founded but dropped out of at the wrong time. Rather than showing his inner good, it shows that from the beginning that he was a selfish and petty man who lets his Pride rule everything he does, deciding to turn down money that could help his family in the long-run because of it. [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain It also serves to foreshadow]] [[VillainProtagonist the kind of man he eventually becomes.]]

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* ''Series/BreakingBad'' may be one of the only times this is portrayed negatively. Walter White, the AntiHero, declines money from his very wealthy former friend to pay for his cancer treatment, opting instead to cook meth. He does this out of {{Pride}} {{pride}} as the money comes from the company that he co-founded but dropped out of at the wrong time. Rather than showing his inner good, it shows that from the beginning that he was a selfish and petty man who lets his Pride pride rule everything he does, deciding to [[ShouldntYouStopStealing turn down money money]] that could help his family in the long-run because of it. [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain It also serves to foreshadow]] [[VillainProtagonist the kind of man he eventually becomes.]]


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** Walter's partner Jesse is an AntiVillain who frequently prioritizes doing the right thing over the smart thing. Near the end of the series he has a breakdown and tries to become TheAtoner, frantically attempting to give away his millions in blood money before resorting to just throwing it out of his car window and getting himself arrested for it.


* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and makes it look like she did it. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead, Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. (It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.)

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* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and makes it look like she did it. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead, Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. (It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.)) It's only thanks to a last-minute save by someone who ''is'' willing to lie that Olivia isn't indicted for murder.


* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and frames her for the shooting. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.

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* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and frames her for the shooting.makes it look like she did it. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead Instead, Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. It's (It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.)


* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and frames her for the shooting. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.

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* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and frames her for the shooting. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]'') Tucker]]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.

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* In one episode of ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', a dangerous serial rapist and killer kills himself in front of Olivia and frames her for the shooting. Given that the man in question was holding Olivia and two children prisoner and was actively threatening her, Olivia ''would'' have been justified in shooting him, so virtually everybody around her (including ''[[InternalAffairs Tucker]'') urges her to just run with the easy explanation and say she shot him in self-defense. Instead Olivia insists on sticking to the true story, which is bizarre enough that it comes across to some people like she has something to hide. It's worth noting that Olivia ''had'' lied in a previous trial regarding the same individual and it came back to bite her, so her determination to tell the truth might be an overcompensation for that.


* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': When presented with evidence of a flaw in the system that judges humanity the [[CelestialBureaucracy Good Place Council]]'s idea of "decisive action" is to take 400 years to form a blue ribbon committee who will spend the next 1,000 years investigating ''themselves'' for conflict of interest. Michael, who brought the issue to their attention, points out that during that time billions of humans will be wrongly sent to the [[{{Hell}} Bad Place]] to be tortured and asks why they can't do something ''now''. The council respond by pointing out that there are rules and procedures that they have to follow because "We're the [[LawfulStupid good guys]]. We can't just ''do stuff''."

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* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': When presented with evidence In the third season of ''Series/TheGoodPlace'', the heroes uncover a serious flaw in the system that judges humanity human actions when they find out that [[spoiler:no human has gotten into the [[CelestialBureaucracy Good Place Council]]'s in ''over five centuries'']]. Michael (himself an AscendedDemon) brings the issue to the attention of the [[OurAngelsAreDifferent Good Place Council]], who are legitimately horrified and promise to take immediate action. [[GoodIsImpotent However]], their idea of "decisive action" is to take 400 years to form a blue ribbon committee who will spend the next 1,000 years investigating ''themselves'' for conflict any conflicts of interest. Michael, who brought the issue to their attention, Michael points out that during that time billions time, [[spoiler:billions of humans will be wrongly sent to the [[{{Hell}} Bad Place]] to be tortured tortured]] and asks why they can't do something ''now''. The council respond by pointing out that there are rules and procedures that they have to follow because "We're the [[LawfulStupid good guys]]. We can't just ''do stuff''."


* Gordon in ''Series/{{Gotham}}'' is adamant to solve the Wayne murders due to his promise to Bruce even if the case is officially closed and becoming more involved would put him and his loved ones in danger.

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* Gordon in ''Series/{{Gotham}}'' is adamant to solve about solving the Wayne murders due to his promise to Bruce even if after the case is officially closed and becoming more involved would put him and his loved ones in danger.danger.
** Just like in the comics, [[Characters/BatmanTheCharacter Bruce Wayne]] is prone to this when it comes to his rule about [[ThouShaltNotKill not killing anyone while he's fighting crime.]] Fittingly, he is most prone to this whenever he is fighting Jerome or Jeremiah Valeska, identical twins who are the two most likely candidates on this Batman prequel show to become the future Joker. He can also take this to ridiculous extremes. At one point, after Bruce prevents Selena from killing Jerome, [[AxCrazy Jerome]] actually has a rare {{pet the dog}} moment where he considers saving Bruce from a different criminal in order to repay him for saving his life. When Bruce sees that Jerome is about to shoot the man strangling him, though, he tells him not to, because he believes so strongly in not killing criminals that he is against it even when it could save his life. Jerome, [[LaughablyEvil being who he is]], decides it would be funnier to watch him get strangled because of his honor than help him, and precedes to laugh at him and watch him struggle rather than intervene.

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** Walter's brother-in-law and DEA agent, Hank, is a more straightly played example. Hank knows (and is, in fact, specifically threatened by Walter) that his career will end if he brings Walter in. After all, who will be believe that that the largest meth manufacturer/dealer in the Southwest could operate right under Hank's nose? Either Hank looks utterly incompetent at best, or at worst, that he is in on it. Hank decides to go after Walter anyway, leading to....less than optimal results for Hank.


** This also comes up pretty much any time the "Laws of Time" get invoked. So the one Dalek who escaped the Time War, over thousands of years, becomes a half million Daleks, causing untold misery on Earth in the meantime. So does the Doctor just take the time machine at his disposal, go back in time, and fight the Dalek when there's only one of them? Of course not. When the Doctor tries to bring Rose back to her home, but accidentally arrives one year too late, causing Rose to have been listed as a missing person, her boyfriend to have been arrested for supposedly murdering her, and lots of trauma suffered by her family members, you'd think this would be easily fixable by just getting back in the TARDIS and getting it right this time, but that never even comes up. Even yanking Adric off of the crashing ship he's on is quickly shot down thanks to the Laws of Time, even though doing so wouldn't have altered history at all, as the ship still would have crashed, and the resulting aftermath would have been the same.
*** Within the world of ''Series/DoctorWho'', going back on one's own timeline is a ''strict no-no'' in fact, there's something about it called the Blinovitch Limitation Effect. The Doctor's code is less "honour before reason" and more "try to do as little damage to the timeline as you can." After all stories where history is changed usually cause disastrous consequences (see "The Waters of Mars"). As for not saving Adric, well... [[TheScrappy This is Adric we're talking about]].


* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': When presented with evidence of a flaw in the system that judges humanity the [[CelestialBureaucracy Good Place Council]]'s idea of "decisive action" is to take 400 years to form a blue ribbon committee who will spend the next 1,000 years investigating ''themselves'' for conflict of interest. Michael, who brought the issue to their attention, points out that during that time billions of humans will be wrongly sent to the [[{{Hell}} Bad Place]] to be tortured and asks why they can't do something ''now''. The council respond by pointing out that there are rules and procedures that they have to follow because "We're the [[LawfulStupid good guys]]. We can't just ''do stuff'."

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* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': When presented with evidence of a flaw in the system that judges humanity the [[CelestialBureaucracy Good Place Council]]'s idea of "decisive action" is to take 400 years to form a blue ribbon committee who will spend the next 1,000 years investigating ''themselves'' for conflict of interest. Michael, who brought the issue to their attention, points out that during that time billions of humans will be wrongly sent to the [[{{Hell}} Bad Place]] to be tortured and asks why they can't do something ''now''. The council respond by pointing out that there are rules and procedures that they have to follow because "We're the [[LawfulStupid good guys]]. We can't just ''do stuff'.stuff''."


* Prince Arthur in BBC's ''{{Series/Merlin}}'' has demonstrated this trope repeatedly, as far back as his risking his life to save Merlin in 1X04, all the way up to [[spoiler:literally putting his neck on the line to keep his word to Morgause]] in late season 2.
** Also Lancelot. Much to Guinevere's exasperation, it's almost as if he and Arthur are in some kind of competition as to who can be the most stoically self-sacrificing. (Lancelot's winning).

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* BBC's ''{{Series/Merlin|2008}}'':
**
Prince Arthur in BBC's ''{{Series/Merlin}}'' has demonstrated demonstrates this trope repeatedly, as far back as his risking his life to save Merlin in 1X04, all the way up to [[spoiler:literally putting his neck on the line to keep his word to Morgause]] in late season 2.
** Also Lancelot. Much to Guinevere's exasperation, it's almost as if he and Arthur are in some kind of competition as to who can be the most stoically self-sacrificing. (Lancelot's winning).

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* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': When presented with evidence of a flaw in the system that judges humanity the [[CelestialBureaucracy Good Place Council]]'s idea of "decisive action" is to take 400 years to form a blue ribbon committee who will spend the next 1,000 years investigating ''themselves'' for conflict of interest. Michael, who brought the issue to their attention, points out that during that time billions of humans will be wrongly sent to the [[{{Hell}} Bad Place]] to be tortured and asks why they can't do something ''now''. The council respond by pointing out that there are rules and procedures that they have to follow because "We're the [[LawfulStupid good guys]]. We can't just ''do stuff'."

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** Balon Greyjoy is this, of a sort. Balon is so dedicated to his vision of the Iron Price that he spurns Robb Stark's alliance, Theon's allegiance, and trade in general, despite those things potentially granting him his old lands and full title, an heir, and the ability for his kingdom to prosper, respectively.


** Delen always at least seems like [[TheMcCoy the sort of person]] who would put HonorBeforeReason. In fact she several times [[IDidWhatIHadToDo does what she has to do]] and once or twice what she definitely doesn't have to do. But she always gives the impression of putting HonorBeforeReason, prefers that as her default, and sometimes has a CrowningMomentOfAwesome while doing so. When told that Neroon is coming to assassinate her, Delenn forbids Lennier to tell Sheridan, believing that the Minbari people should deal with their own internal dirty laundry without foreign interference.

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** Delen always at least seems like [[TheMcCoy the sort of person]] who would put HonorBeforeReason. In fact she several times [[IDidWhatIHadToDo does what she has to do]] and once or twice what she definitely doesn't have to do. But she always gives the impression of putting HonorBeforeReason, prefers that as her default, and sometimes has a CrowningMomentOfAwesome while doing so.default. When told that Neroon is coming to assassinate her, Delenn forbids Lennier to tell Sheridan, believing that the Minbari people should deal with their own internal dirty laundry without foreign interference.



** ''Series/{{Rome}}'' also has a very interesting take on this trope with Lucius Vorenus. He is driven by his morals 100% and can think of nothing worse than dishonor. He stays loyal to Antony even after his death, prompting Octavian to comment: "The man turns loyalty into a vice". What makes Vorenus an interesting example is that he is so completely driven by his sense of honor and moral, but those don't exactly measure up with the ones we have today. He is, for example, prepared to kill the boy Lucius (his dead wife's bastard son) because "honor demands it". [[spoiler:Except he doesn't kill him after all, subverting this trope for perhaps the ''only'' time in all of his onscreen appearances, which made for a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming - or at least what passes for one in this show.]]

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** ''Series/{{Rome}}'' also has a very interesting take on this trope with Lucius Vorenus. He is driven by his morals 100% and can think of nothing worse than dishonor. He stays loyal to Antony even after his death, prompting Octavian to comment: "The man turns loyalty into a vice". What makes Vorenus an interesting example is that he is so completely driven by his sense of honor and moral, but those don't exactly measure up with the ones we have today. He is, for example, prepared to kill the boy Lucius (his dead wife's bastard son) because "honor demands it". [[spoiler:Except he doesn't kill him after all, subverting this trope for perhaps the ''only'' time in all of his onscreen appearances, which made for a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming - or at least what passes for one in this show.appearances.]]

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* Both Decker and Jayden in ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai''. Decker wants to duel Jayden, but only when he's at full strength. Jayden decides to give him his one-on-one, even after they Rangers find out he's a Nighlok, and after Kevin tells him they should fight him as a team, like any other Nighlok.

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