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* Similarly, when Elaine agrees to have sex with Jerry to save the friendship in “The Mango.” She didn’t like the idea of having sex at first, but when their friendship was on the line she decides that she’d rather do something she doesn’t want to do rather than lose Jerry as a friend.

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* Similarly, when Elaine agrees to have sex with Jerry to save the friendship in “The Mango.” She didn’t like the idea of having sex at first, but when their friendship was is on the line she decides that she’d rather do something she doesn’t want to do rather than lose Jerry as a friend.

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*Similarly, when Elaine agrees to have sex with Jerry to save the friendship in “The Mango.” She didn’t like the idea of having sex at first, but when their friendship was on the line she decides that she’d rather do something she doesn’t want to do rather than lose Jerry as a friend.


* "The Yada Yada" has [[BigGuyLittleGuy Kramer and Mickey Abbott]] squabbling over some girls they're double-dating with, neither of them being sure who's supposed to be dating who. After the argument is finally settled in Kramer's favor, he goes to meet the his new girlfriend's family only to discover that her parents are little people like Mickey. At this, he unhesitatingly switches girlfriends, convinced that Mickey will be happier with that family. This goes about as well as you'd expect (turns out the girl already prefers Kramer), but it's a very rare moment of unselfish consideration from a ''Seinfeld'' character.

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* "The Yada Yada" has [[BigGuyLittleGuy Kramer and Mickey Abbott]] squabbling over some girls they're double-dating with, neither of them being sure who's supposed to be dating who. After the argument is finally settled in Kramer's favor, he goes to meet the his new girlfriend's family only to discover that her parents are little people like Mickey. At this, he unhesitatingly switches girlfriends, convinced that Mickey will be happier with that family. This goes about as well as you'd expect (turns out the girl already prefers Kramer), but it's a very rare moment of unselfish consideration from a ''Seinfeld'' character.


* "The Yada Yada" has [[BigGuyLittleGuy Kramer and Mickey Abbott]] squabbling over some girls they're double-dating with, neither of them being sure who's supposed to be dating who. After the argument is finally settled in Kramer's favor, he goes to meet the his new girlfriend's family only to discover that her parents are little people like Mickey. He unhesitatingly switches girlfriends, convinced that Mickey will be happier with that family. This goes about as well as you'd expect, but it's a very rare moment of unselfish consideration from a ''Seinfeld'' character.

to:

* "The Yada Yada" has [[BigGuyLittleGuy Kramer and Mickey Abbott]] squabbling over some girls they're double-dating with, neither of them being sure who's supposed to be dating who. After the argument is finally settled in Kramer's favor, he goes to meet the his new girlfriend's family only to discover that her parents are little people like Mickey. He At this, he unhesitatingly switches girlfriends, convinced that Mickey will be happier with that family. This goes about as well as you'd expect, expect (turns out the girl already prefers Kramer), but it's a very rare moment of unselfish consideration from a ''Seinfeld'' character.


* "The Betrayal" ends with a flashback to Jerry moving into the building eleven years earlier and meeting Kramer for the first time. Notably, [[HilariousInFlashback Jerry is the one who invites Kramer, who's afraid to impose, in for a bite to eat]], encouraging him with the phrase, "[[ExactWords What's mine is yours]]" with no awareness of [[LiteralMinded how literally Kramer's going to take that dictum]].

to:

* "The Betrayal" ends with a flashback to Jerry moving into the building eleven years earlier and meeting Kramer for the first time. Notably, [[HilariousInFlashback Jerry is the one who invites Kramer, who's afraid to impose, in for a bite to eat]], encouraging him with the phrase, "[[ExactWords What's mine is yours]]" with no awareness of [[LiteralMinded how literally Kramer's going to take that dictum]].dictum]].
* "The Yada Yada" has [[BigGuyLittleGuy Kramer and Mickey Abbott]] squabbling over some girls they're double-dating with, neither of them being sure who's supposed to be dating who. After the argument is finally settled in Kramer's favor, he goes to meet the his new girlfriend's family only to discover that her parents are little people like Mickey. He unhesitatingly switches girlfriends, convinced that Mickey will be happier with that family. This goes about as well as you'd expect, but it's a very rare moment of unselfish consideration from a ''Seinfeld'' character.


** In a rare (perhaps totally unique) glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].

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** In a rare (perhaps totally unique) glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that for "all these years" [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].


** In a rare glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].

to:

** In a rare (perhaps totally unique) glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].


* "The Betrayal" ends with a flashback to Jerry moving into the building eleven years earlier and meeting Kramer for the first time. Notably, [[DramaticIrony Jerry is the one who invites Kramer, who's afraid to impose, in for a bite to eat]], encouraging him with the phrase, "[[ExactWords What's mine is yours]]" with no awareness of [[LiteralMinded how literally Kramer's going to take that dictum]].

to:

* "The Betrayal" ends with a flashback to Jerry moving into the building eleven years earlier and meeting Kramer for the first time. Notably, [[DramaticIrony [[HilariousInFlashback Jerry is the one who invites Kramer, who's afraid to impose, in for a bite to eat]], encouraging him with the phrase, "[[ExactWords What's mine is yours]]" with no awareness of [[LiteralMinded how literally Kramer's going to take that dictum]].


** In a rare glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].

to:

** In a rare glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].together]].
* "The Betrayal" ends with a flashback to Jerry moving into the building eleven years earlier and meeting Kramer for the first time. Notably, [[DramaticIrony Jerry is the one who invites Kramer, who's afraid to impose, in for a bite to eat]], encouraging him with the phrase, "[[ExactWords What's mine is yours]]" with no awareness of [[LiteralMinded how literally Kramer's going to take that dictum]].


* "The Serenity Now" is just a full episode's worth of experimentally violating the "no hugging, no learning" credo, with hilarious results (and arguably a bit of TakeThat to the idea of making ''Seinfeld'' anything other than the SadistShow it is, with Jerry noting that getting in touch with his emotions improves his life in every way [[ComedicSociopathy at the expense of his comedy]]). A few moments stand out as genuinely touching, though, among them the fact that while George's reaction to Jerry's PlatonicDeclarationOfLove is one of [[WeWantOurJerkBack utter horror]], Kramer responds to the same with an unfussy and casual, but clearly sincere, "I love you too, buddy."

to:

* "The Serenity Now" is just a full episode's worth of experimentally violating the "no hugging, no learning" credo, with hilarious results (and arguably a bit of TakeThat to the idea of making ''Seinfeld'' anything other than the SadistShow it is, with Jerry noting that getting in touch with his emotions improves his life in every way [[ComedicSociopathy at the expense of his comedy]]). A few moments stand out as genuinely touching, though, among them the fact that while George's reaction to Jerry's PlatonicDeclarationOfLove is one of [[WeWantOurJerkBack utter horror]], Kramer responds to the same with an unfussy and casual, but clearly sincere, "I love you too, buddy.""
** In a rare glimpse of George's romantic side, he admits to Elaine that [[ShipperOnDeck he's always secretly wanted her and Jerry to get back together]].


-->'''Kramer:''' No, no, you're stout. The camera loves stoutness! ''(He crouches down to talk to George.)'' Look, we're not going to do anything that makes you feel uncomfortable! The key word is "tasteful." Now I want you to relax and have fun. 'Cause you're a fun guy! ''(Sees George cheering up.)'' All ''right!'' Let's do it, huh?! Yeah!

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-->'''Kramer:''' No, no, you're stout. The camera loves stoutness! ''(He crouches down to talk to George.)'' Look, we're not going to do anything that makes you feel uncomfortable! The key word is "tasteful." Now I want you to relax and have fun. 'Cause you're a fun guy! ''(Sees George cheering up.)'' All ''right!'' Let's do it, huh?! Yeah!Yeah!
* "The Serenity Now" is just a full episode's worth of experimentally violating the "no hugging, no learning" credo, with hilarious results (and arguably a bit of TakeThat to the idea of making ''Seinfeld'' anything other than the SadistShow it is, with Jerry noting that getting in touch with his emotions improves his life in every way [[ComedicSociopathy at the expense of his comedy]]). A few moments stand out as genuinely touching, though, among them the fact that while George's reaction to Jerry's PlatonicDeclarationOfLove is one of [[WeWantOurJerkBack utter horror]], Kramer responds to the same with an unfussy and casual, but clearly sincere, "I love you too, buddy."


* Regardless of how it turns out, Kramer psyching George up and encouraging him to be confident during his photoshoot in "The Package" is endearingly sincere, and shockingly given that this is George, it actually works.

to:

* Regardless of how it turns out, Kramer psyching George up and encouraging him to be confident during his photoshoot in "The Package" is both endearingly sincere, and shockingly given sincere and—given that this is George, it actually works.George—shockingly effective.


-->'''Kramer:''' No, no, you're stout. The camera loves stoutness! ''(He crouches down to talk to George.)'' Look, we're not going to do anything that makes you feel uncomfortable! The key word is "tasteful." Now I want you to relax and have fun. 'Cause you're a fun guy! ''(Sees George cheering up.)'' All ''right!'' Let's do it, huh?! Yeah!

---

to:

-->'''Kramer:''' No, no, you're stout. The camera loves stoutness! ''(He crouches down to talk to George.)'' Look, we're not going to do anything that makes you feel uncomfortable! The key word is "tasteful." Now I want you to relax and have fun. 'Cause you're a fun guy! ''(Sees George cheering up.)'' All ''right!'' Let's do it, huh?! Yeah!

---
Yeah!

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* George and Jerry's friendship, which started when they were kids and has continued strong into the show's present despite all obstacles. Buried under all their snarking and JerkAss behavior there's a kernel of something warm and sincere in their liking for each other and the joy they get out of bouncing topics off each other's personalities. Jerry might just be the only person George can truly be himself around.

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