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* BurningTheFlag of the United States is a very taboo action to American Audiences. [[RefugeInAudacity Wrapping it up in the Bill of Rights to burn it certainly doesn't help in that matter.]] So what's the expected reaction from Americans when Penn and Teller do a trick involving just that? ManlyTears.

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* BurningTheFlag of the United States is a very taboo action to American Audiences. [[RefugeInAudacity Wrapping it up in the Bill of Rights to burn it certainly doesn't help in that matter.]] So what's the expected reaction from Americans when Penn and Teller do a trick involving just that? ManlyTears.ManlyTears.
* At the end of their Masterclass, Teller is near tears as he says the best part of doing this career for so long is meeting people who say things like "You brought me on stage when I was seven years old, and this is my seven year old child."


* In 2015, Penn and Teller added a PullARabbitOutOfMyHat routine to their repertoire. They use a rabbit they know, one from their own ensemble. Penn introduces the rabbit by name, while Teller lets audience members pet him. If this is happening on television, Teller will bring the rabbit close to the camera so the home audience can get a good look at it, too.

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* In 2015, Penn and Teller added a PullARabbitOutOfMyHat routine to their repertoire. They use a rabbit they know, one from their own ensemble. Penn introduces the rabbit by name, while Teller lets audience members pet him. If this is happening on television, Teller will bring the rabbit close to the camera so the home audience can get a good look at it, too.too.
* BurningTheFlag of the United States is a very taboo action to American Audiences. [[RefugeInAudacity Wrapping it up in the Bill of Rights to burn it certainly doesn't help in that matter.]] So what's the expected reaction from Americans when Penn and Teller do a trick involving just that? ManlyTears.


* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. To more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own, and says "I think that proves it."

to:

* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. To more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own, and says "I think that proves it.""
* In 2015, Penn and Teller added a PullARabbitOutOfMyHat routine to their repertoire. They use a rabbit they know, one from their own ensemble. Penn introduces the rabbit by name, while Teller lets audience members pet him. If this is happening on television, Teller will bring the rabbit close to the camera so the home audience can get a good look at it, too.


* In a The View interview, Penn's daughter and infant son are dressed in Teller's garb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTc8tVqaMBs

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* In a The View interview, an interview for ''The View'', Penn's daughter and infant son are dressed in Teller's garb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTc8tVqaMBs



* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. But to more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own, and says "I think that proves it."

to:

* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. But to To more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own, and says "I think that proves it."


* In one episode of ''Fool Us'', when Penn and Teller are performing a trick of their own at the end, Penn establishes that Teller (who is supposedly doing a card trick) has not ''really'' lost the card picked by a woman in the audience in the deck. Then he cuts the deck himself and asks her again if she is now satisfied the card is lost. When she responds yes, he shouts, "''Wrong''! No matter how nice I am to you, or how mean I pretend to be to this man here, my first allegiance in the ''world'' is to my partner!" Despite that this was all part of the act and the rest of the routine is about Penn bullying Teller to the point that Teller [[BloodyHilarious stabs him through the hand with a knife]], that one line is clearly actually true and really sums up the level of trust involved in such a close, lasting professional relationship.
* Another episode of ''Fool Us'' has a fifteen-year-old boy, Daniel Kramer, performing. Though he doesn't fool them, Penn's speech after his performance is pure warm fuzzies.



* One aspect of ''Fool Us'' that might be overlooked is the fact that while Penn and Teller might not be fooled by a contestant's act, they are very careful not to reveal the secret of the trick to the audience.
** One specific example is Reuben Moreland, who had a variation of a trick involving dice that Penn admitted he was not a fan of, but loved how Moreland gave it his own twist. Declaring that Moreland "should do this trick for the rest of your life. Take it to your grave," rather than say out loud how they knew the trick, Teller wrote it down, and after Moreland acknowledged that they were right, Teller destroyed the paper he had written on.
* Quite a few of the acts that appear on ''Fool Us'' admit that they probably have no chance of fooling Penn & Teller, and are simply content to appear on the show and perform for the duo, who are often named as an inspiration for getting into the business. For their part, Penn & Teller are not at all shy about doling out the praise if they like the act, whether they're fooled or not.
* One episode of "Fool Us" had a husband and wife mentalist duo. Their act involved the husband taking personal items from the audience and asking the wife to guess them. During the summation, Penn told a story about how he and Teller had worked their asses off for years to do a similar act, and they finally accomplished it... on a deck of cards. These people were able to, it seemed, guess ''anything.'' Though they didn't fool them, Penn said that he admired both the mental gymnastics involved to pull it off and their dedication to the old-school method rather than resorting to cheats like hidden mics.[[labelnote:How they probably did it...]]The mentalist has a complex code worked out with the assistant. "This is interesting" might mean "watch," while "Amazing!" might mean "bracelet." A deck of cards requires 52 unique codewords; Penn was impressed that they had an apparently even more extensive list of codewords.[[/labelnote]]


* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. But to more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own. "I think that proves it."

to:

* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. But to more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own. own, and says "I think that proves it."


* One episode of "Fool Us" had a husband and wife mentalist duo. Their act involved the husband taking personal items from the audience and asking the wife to guess them. During the summation, Penn told a story about how he and Teller had worked their asses off for years to do a similar act, and they finally accomplished it... on a deck of cards. These people were able to, it seemed, guess ''anything.'' Though they didn't fool them, Penn said that he admired both the mental gymnastics involved to pull it off and their dedication to the old-school method rather than resorting to cheats like hidden mics.[[labelnote:How they probably did it...]]The mentalist has a complex code worked out with the assistant. "This is interesting" might mean "watch," while "Amazing!" might mean "bracelet." A deck of cards requires 52 unique codewords; Penn was impressed that they had an apparently even more extensive list of codewords.[[/labelnote]]

to:

* One episode of "Fool Us" had a husband and wife mentalist duo. Their act involved the husband taking personal items from the audience and asking the wife to guess them. During the summation, Penn told a story about how he and Teller had worked their asses off for years to do a similar act, and they finally accomplished it... on a deck of cards. These people were able to, it seemed, guess ''anything.'' Though they didn't fool them, Penn said that he admired both the mental gymnastics involved to pull it off and their dedication to the old-school method rather than resorting to cheats like hidden mics.[[labelnote:How they probably did it...]]The mentalist has a complex code worked out with the assistant. "This is interesting" might mean "watch," while "Amazing!" might mean "bracelet." A deck of cards requires 52 unique codewords; Penn was impressed that they had an apparently even more extensive list of codewords.[[/labelnote]][[/labelnote]]
* The nail-gun trick is about Penn supposedly memorizing a long non-repetitive sequence of nails and empty space to perform a trick where he risks impaling his hand if he gets the sequence wrong. Later into the trick, he explains that he finds risking self-harm for a trick to be unethical, and to drive the point home that it's all an illusion, he performs the last empty shot in the neck. But to more convincingly demonstrate that the trick is completely risk-free, he aims it at Teller's neck instead of his own. "I think that proves it."


* Quite a few of the acts that appear on ''Fool Us'' admit that they probably have no chance of fooling Penn & Teller, and are simply content to appear on the show and perform for the duo, who are often named as an inspiration for getting into the business. For their part, Penn & Teller are not at all shy about doling out the praise if they like the act, whether they're fooled or not.

to:

* Quite a few of the acts that appear on ''Fool Us'' admit that they probably have no chance of fooling Penn & Teller, and are simply content to appear on the show and perform for the duo, who are often named as an inspiration for getting into the business. For their part, Penn & Teller are not at all shy about doling out the praise if they like the act, whether they're fooled or not.not.
* One episode of "Fool Us" had a husband and wife mentalist duo. Their act involved the husband taking personal items from the audience and asking the wife to guess them. During the summation, Penn told a story about how he and Teller had worked their asses off for years to do a similar act, and they finally accomplished it... on a deck of cards. These people were able to, it seemed, guess ''anything.'' Though they didn't fool them, Penn said that he admired both the mental gymnastics involved to pull it off and their dedication to the old-school method rather than resorting to cheats like hidden mics.[[labelnote:How they probably did it...]]The mentalist has a complex code worked out with the assistant. "This is interesting" might mean "watch," while "Amazing!" might mean "bracelet." A deck of cards requires 52 unique codewords; Penn was impressed that they had an apparently even more extensive list of codewords.[[/labelnote]]


* Quite a few of the acts that appear on ''Fool Us'' admit that they probably have no chance of cooling Penn & Teller, and are simply content to appear on the show and perform for the duo, who are often named as an inspiration for getting into the business. For their part, Penn & Teller are not at all shy about doling out the praise if they like the act, whether they're fooled or not.

to:

* Quite a few of the acts that appear on ''Fool Us'' admit that they probably have no chance of cooling fooling Penn & Teller, and are simply content to appear on the show and perform for the duo, who are often named as an inspiration for getting into the business. For their part, Penn & Teller are not at all shy about doling out the praise if they like the act, whether they're fooled or not.


** One specific example is Reuben Moreland, who had a variation of a trick involving dice that Penn admitted he was not a fan of, but loved how Moreland gave it his own twist. Declaring that Moreland "should do this trick for the rest of your life. Take it to your grave," rather than say out loud how they knew the trick, Teller wrote it down, and after Moreland acknowledged that they were right, Teller destroyed the paper he had written on.

to:

** One specific example is Reuben Moreland, who had a variation of a trick involving dice that Penn admitted he was not a fan of, but loved how Moreland gave it his own twist. Declaring that Moreland "should do this trick for the rest of your life. Take it to your grave," rather than say out loud how they knew the trick, Teller wrote it down, and after Moreland acknowledged that they were right, Teller destroyed the paper he had written on.on.
* Quite a few of the acts that appear on ''Fool Us'' admit that they probably have no chance of cooling Penn & Teller, and are simply content to appear on the show and perform for the duo, who are often named as an inspiration for getting into the business. For their part, Penn & Teller are not at all shy about doling out the praise if they like the act, whether they're fooled or not.


* Penn and Teller have sponsored a "13 Bloody Days of Christmas" blood drive in Las Vegas for many years, including free show tickets for all blood donors.

to:

* Penn and Teller have sponsored a "13 Bloody Days of Christmas" blood drive in Las Vegas for many years, including free show tickets for all blood donors.donors.
* One aspect of ''Fool Us'' that might be overlooked is the fact that while Penn and Teller might not be fooled by a contestant's act, they are very careful not to reveal the secret of the trick to the audience.
** One specific example is Reuben Moreland, who had a variation of a trick involving dice that Penn admitted he was not a fan of, but loved how Moreland gave it his own twist. Declaring that Moreland "should do this trick for the rest of your life. Take it to your grave," rather than say out loud how they knew the trick, Teller wrote it down, and after Moreland acknowledged that they were right, Teller destroyed the paper he had written on.


* In a The View interview, Penn's daughter and infant son are dressed in Teller's garb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTc8tVqaMBs

to:

* In a The View interview, Penn's daughter and infant son are dressed in Teller's garb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTc8tVqaMBscom/watch?v=uTc8tVqaMBs
* Penn and Teller have sponsored a "13 Bloody Days of Christmas" blood drive in Las Vegas for many years, including free show tickets for all blood donors.


* In their China trip in ''Magic and Mystery Tour,'' Penn and Teller befriending a family of Chinese magicians, with an uncle of the family giving them an eye-poker tool as a gift.

to:

* In their China trip in ''Magic and Mystery Tour,'' Penn and Teller befriending a family of Chinese magicians, with an uncle of the family giving them an eye-poker tool as a gift. Teller would later show off his eye-poker in an interview footage.


* Penn and Teller befriending a family of Chinese magicians, with an uncle of the family giving them an eye-poker tool as a gift.

to:

* In their China trip in ''Magic and Mystery Tour,'' Penn and Teller befriending a family of Chinese magicians, with an uncle of the family giving them an eye-poker tool as a gift.gift.
* In a The View interview, Penn's daughter and infant son are dressed in Teller's garb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTc8tVqaMBs


* Another episode of ''Fool Us'' has a fifteen-year-old boy, Daniel Kramer, performing. Though he doesn't fool them, Penn's speech after his performance is pure warm fuzzies.

to:

* Another episode of ''Fool Us'' has a fifteen-year-old boy, Daniel Kramer, performing. Though he doesn't fool them, Penn's speech after his performance is pure warm fuzzies.fuzzies.
* Penn and Teller befriending a family of Chinese magicians, with an uncle of the family giving them an eye-poker tool as a gift.

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