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** Judging by their clothes, the flashbacks likely took place around the 50's-60's. Maybe they did remember, but either weren't bothered by it or were afraid that O'Hare would find out, before Grammy Norma finally told Ted the truth.



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** Well, for the paper part, one could always link it the [[AccidentalAesop accidental aesop]] of reforestation and sustainable logging. There is nothing wrong with using the paper itself, the problem comes in replacing the trees that were cut down in the first place (And those who refuse to do it out of greed or laziness like the Once-Ler)


* How do some characters in the show have ridiculously high strength? Audrey knocked Ted on the floor, Once-Ler could carry a Truffula Tree with only his bare hands without much effort, and Bret and Chet threw a Barbaloot miles away from them, again with their bare hands. It's even weirder when the three [[MusclesAreMeaningless are scrawny]].

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* How do some characters in the show have ridiculously high strength? Audrey knocked Ted on the floor, Once-Ler could carry a Truffula Tree with only his bare hands without much effort, and Bret and Chet threw a Barbaloot miles away from them, again with their bare hands. It's even weirder when all the three four of them [[MusclesAreMeaningless are scrawny]].


** There are other methods of turning CO2 into oxygen. They require energy inputs (as do plants), but they're quite real.

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** There are other methods of turning CO2 into oxygen. They require energy inputs (as do plants), but they're quite real.real.

* How do some characters in the show have ridiculously high strength? Audrey knocked Ted on the floor, Once-Ler could carry a Truffula Tree with only his bare hands without much effort, and Bret and Chet threw a Barbaloot miles away from them, again with their bare hands. It's even weirder when the three [[MusclesAreMeaningless are scrawny]].



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** It's explained in the film - his family doesn't want to pick the fluff little by little, so they cut down the entire tree.




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** Or that's just a story people say about him and he really doesn't need snails? Alternatively, snails are an important part of the truffula forest ecosystem (well, bar-ba-loots eat the fruit and leave seeds around, so snails might have another task to fulfill)? Or it's just RoleOfFunny.

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* In fact, why does he chop down trees to harvest the leaves? You don't harvest apples by chopping down apple trees.


Ted mightíve had his happy ending handed to him on a silver platter, but Once-ler worked hard for his own, both good and bad.

* Where the heck is the rest of civilization? Or the rest of nature, for that matter? The once-ler cut down a single forest, and now there's one city left on earth and they have to pay for air? Are they on some kind of island, cut off from the rest of the world?
** Isolation. Practically every single person is completely sold on how perfect Thneedville is, and why would you want to leave your perfect home? O-Hare probably dissuades any one who shows any interest in what's beyond the wall, like how he tried to threaten Ted into staying inside.
*** That may be why the people in Thneedville don't know/care about the outside world, but what about how the outside world knows about Thneedville? There's clearly evidence of a world outside of the Truffula valley, yet nobody in the outside world questions why there's a single town in the middle of a dead wasteland completely enclosed in a giant metal dome? Do people ever move to Thneedville? Do the Thneedvillians have friends or family outside of the town? Why haven't any outside authorities stepped in to arrest O'Hare for being a polluting dictator?
*** My impression is that Thneedville exists in a world of isolated city-states with long-distance travel being uncommon and no central authority. The rare traveler passing by Thneedville either can't get inside or is turned away by (or works for) O'Hare.

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Ted *Ted mightíve had his happy ending handed to him on a silver platter, but Once-ler worked hard for his own, both good and bad.

* ** Where the heck is the rest of civilization? Or the rest of nature, for that matter? The once-ler cut down a single forest, and now there's one city left on earth and they have to pay for air? Are they on some kind of island, cut off from the rest of the world?
** *** Isolation. Practically every single person is completely sold on how perfect Thneedville is, and why would you want to leave your perfect home? O-Hare probably dissuades any one who shows any interest in what's beyond the wall, like how he tried to threaten Ted into staying inside.
*** **** That may be why the people in Thneedville don't know/care about the outside world, but what about how the outside world knows about Thneedville? There's clearly evidence of a world outside of the Truffula valley, yet nobody in the outside world questions why there's a single town in the middle of a dead wasteland completely enclosed in a giant metal dome? Do people ever move to Thneedville? Do the Thneedvillians have friends or family outside of the town? Why haven't any outside authorities stepped in to arrest O'Hare for being a polluting dictator?
*** **** My impression is that Thneedville exists in a world of isolated city-states with long-distance travel being uncommon and no central authority. The rare traveler passing by Thneedville either can't get inside or is turned away by (or works for) O'Hare.


* How does O'Hare refresh the air? Aside from removing pollution, only a plant could turn CO2 back into Oxygen. The best theory I can come up with is that he has some sort of hidden greenhouse where he grows Truffula trees in secret.

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* How does O'Hare refresh the air? Aside from removing pollution, only a plant could turn CO2 back into Oxygen. The best theory I can come up with is that he has some sort of hidden greenhouse where he grows Truffula trees in secret.secret.
** There are other methods of turning CO2 into oxygen. They require energy inputs (as do plants), but they're quite real.



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** Given the Once-ler's personality, he probably was not fiscally responsible. Instead of saving money for a rainy day, he likely spent it as fast as he made it - or even faster, borrowing against future earnings, since his income kept increasing and he would assume that was going to continue forever. When his business crashed, he kept his lavish lifestyle going until he went bankrupt. He's lucky to still have the house.
** Another possibility is that his mother took all the money remaining with her when she left.



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*** My impression is that Thneedville exists in a world of isolated city-states with long-distance travel being uncommon and no central authority. The rare traveler passing by Thneedville either can't get inside or is turned away by (or works for) O'Hare.


** It's not hypocritical just because of the fact that they use paper for advertisements, but it's also because of the 70 corporate tie-ins despite the fact that the movie is very anti-corporation.

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** It's not hypocritical just because of the fact that they use paper for advertisements, but it's also because of the 70 corporate tie-ins despite the fact that the movie is very anti-corporation.anti-corporation.

* How does O'Hare refresh the air? Aside from removing pollution, only a plant could turn CO2 back into Oxygen. The best theory I can come up with is that he has some sort of hidden greenhouse where he grows Truffula trees in secret.



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** It still would have been finite. We don't know exactly how much time has passed but it's at least been a few decades. Unless he made some investments in the mean time that would have provided him with a steady source of income, his money would still run out eventually. Either the poor living conditions were an attempt to make it stretch as long as possible, or the movie takes place when he was already close to going broke.



** I think a part of it is because having the Once-ler place all of the blame on himself even after we saw that it was his family who'd done the most damage makes the audience feel even more sorry for him than before, because he's taking responsibility for someting the movie doesn't suggest he did firsthand - thus, he's coming off as too sympathetic and pitiable. In the original animated short (which I've never actually seen), we see that he feels sorry for what he's done, but sympathy for him feels ''earned'' in that sense because he did do wrong in that version and it really was his fault and he expresses the need to repent for it.

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** I think a part of it is because having the Once-ler place all of the blame on himself even after we saw that it was his family who'd done the most damage makes the audience feel even more sorry for him than before, because he's taking responsibility for someting something the movie doesn't suggest he did firsthand - thus, he's coming off as too sympathetic and pitiable. In the original animated short (which I've never actually seen), we see that he feels sorry for what he's done, but sympathy for him feels ''earned'' in that sense because he did do wrong in that version and it really was his fault and he expresses the need to repent for it.


** No, I've seen both the 1971 short and read the book. Don't patronize me, come on, now. Those two work because the once-ler acts only on greed. He's not sympathetic, and he represents corporations, not humanity/new generations like Ted does. The Once-ler, in the book/short feels shame about his decisions, but the story's not about his shame. It doesn't matter if he cares or not. What matters is that ''Ted'' cares. In the new movie, however, the story is half about the once-ler. They spend a lot of time illustrating what kind of character he is and the intent behind his actions, but he doesn't finish his character arc. He's set up as sympathetic, then doesn't get a very happy ending. In the book/short, the once-ler doesn't need a happy ending, it's not important. I'm analyzing the characters personally, not the plot as a whole. For the plot, yeah, it all works out, but when you take a step inward and look at the ''characters, themselves, as people'' the story doesn't really hold them up very well. If the movie wanted to focus on the plot and the symbolism, that's what it should have done, not make the Once-ler have a fruedian excuse for what he does, because that's irrelevant. Hope this makes sense.
*** I find this Tumblr post summarizes everything quite neatly: http://quietlyinvisible.tumblr.com/post/19423322619/my-own-view
*** Ted is us. He is the common person. Most people donít have horrible home lives, we actually have pretty good ones. Our troubles pale in comparison to Once-lerís if we really think about it. That is why Ted is the one to plant the seed- because itís us that needs to plant those seeds.

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** **** No, I've seen both the 1971 short and read the book. Don't patronize me, come on, now. Those two work because the once-ler acts only on greed. He's not sympathetic, and he represents corporations, not humanity/new generations like Ted does. The Once-ler, in the book/short feels shame about his decisions, but the story's not about his shame. It doesn't matter if he cares or not. What matters is that ''Ted'' cares. In the new movie, however, the story is half about the once-ler. They spend a lot of time illustrating what kind of character he is and the intent behind his actions, but he doesn't finish his character arc. He's set up as sympathetic, then doesn't get a very happy ending. In the book/short, the once-ler doesn't need a happy ending, it's not important. I'm analyzing the characters personally, not the plot as a whole. For the plot, yeah, it all works out, but when you take a step inward and look at the ''characters, themselves, as people'' the story doesn't really hold them up very well. If the movie wanted to focus on the plot and the symbolism, that's what it should have done, not make the Once-ler have a fruedian excuse for what he does, because that's irrelevant. Hope this makes sense.
*** ***** I find this Tumblr post summarizes everything quite neatly: http://quietlyinvisible.tumblr.com/post/19423322619/my-own-view
*** ****** Ted is us. He is the common person. Most people donít have horrible home lives, we actually have pretty good ones. Our troubles pale in comparison to Once-lerís if we really think about it. That is why Ted is the one to plant the seed- because itís us that needs to plant those seeds.


***** The film is kind of ambiguous about the amount of time that passes. The first Truffula in the town is shown growing, and that's used as a transition to a different Truffula out near the Once-ler's home. Either way, the film's Truffula grow a lot faster than the original Truffula (which took around thirty years to completely mature).

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***** The film is kind of ambiguous about the amount of time that passes. The first Truffula in the town is shown growing, and that's used as a transition to a different Truffula out near the Once-ler's home. Either way, the film's Truffula grow a lot faster than the original Truffula (which took around thirty twenty years to completely mature).

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