Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Headscratchers / TheHobbit

Go To


Added DiffLines:

*** Or maybe it's an inversion of ents' normal physiology: they've got leaves, so they presumably get nourishment from sunlight, while gradually becoming more tree-like with age. Tolkien trolls, as diametric opposites of ents, are ''vanquished'' by sunlight and transform ''very quickly'' into stone rather than wood.

Added DiffLines:

*** "Air force" wasn't really a thing when [=JRRT=] wrote the novel, though. Maybe he counted them as a subordinate Air Corps for one of the three main good-guy armies ... but if so, which one?



to:

**** If the thief robbed my house and stole your car to make his getaway, and I followed him and beat him up (or, more like, chased him to a third person, who beat him up for the same reason), recovering all of his stolen goods in the process, that doesn't entitle me to your car.


*** This is a world where the creators of most of the species are known and you can go say hi if you know where to sail, and if you need to talk to the Big G God of the setting they can get a hold of him. It is very much old-school creationism. Arda hasn't even existed long enough for evolution to be significant, it's less than 100,000 years old at most. At the end of the Third age it's exactly 7,422 years since they ''built the sun and moon'', and they can be that precise because several characters (Galadriel and Elrond for example) are ''still around'' from before then.

to:

*** This is a world where the creators of most of the species are known and you can go say hi if you know where to sail, and if you need to talk to the Big G God of the setting they can get a hold of him. It is very much old-school creationism. Arda hasn't even existed long enough for evolution to be significant, it's less than 100,000 years old at most. At the end of the Third age it's exactly 7,422 years since they ''built the sun and moon'', and they can be that precise because several characters (Galadriel and Elrond Cirdan, possibly Celeborn depending on which backstory you use, for example) are ''still around'' from before then.

Added DiffLines:

** Thorin had already made clear he wouldn't give the Lakemen and Elves a single penny under coercion. So even if Bilbo had followed the spirit of Thorin's offer and just chosen a big pile of gold and silver, which was theoretically "his to do with as he pleased," Thorin probably wouldn't have ''let'' him give it to them.


[[folder: The Nazgûl]]
* In the film, the Necromancer appears to raise the Nazgûl from tombs. Hang on... they never actually died, right? So why were they inside tombs? Ones in Mirkwood, even! If they did "die", it would have been at the War of the Last Alliance, so who dragged their nonexistent bodies from Mordor to Mirkwood?
[[/folder]]

to:

[[folder: The Nazgûl]]
* In the film, the Necromancer appears to raise the Nazgûl from tombs. Hang on... they never actually died, right? So why were they inside tombs? Ones in Mirkwood, even! If they did "die", it would have been at the War of the Last Alliance, so who dragged their nonexistent bodies from Mordor to Mirkwood?
[[/folder]]

Added DiffLines:

** They don't have two throats. They have one really large throat with a uvula that makes it look like they have two throats sometimes.

Added DiffLines:


* In the song where the party is captured by goblins, why the fuck do they all run right into the exact cave that the ponies just got dragged into? They clearly realized from the start that it was goblins at work. Seems like the only sensible thing to do would be to get the hell away from that cave, not run right into it, regardless of the ponies. Here's a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPkqjc23yqs&feature=related link]] to the song if you've never seen it.
** Weren't all their supplies on those ponies? They were a little too far up in the mountains to make it back without any food. Not to mention that Thorin the exile and his compatriots could only afford to fund ''one'' expedition. If they lose all their resources, then even if they avoid starvation on the trip back they've still failed in their quest.
*** On closer inspection, Thorin actually shouts something like ''protect the ponies'', it's just really badly muffled by the music.
*** He says "The goblins are upon us! Save the ponies from the goblins!"
* Why do Goblins have [[BizarreAlienBiology two throats]]? Does it have something to do with their [[MusicalWorldHypotheses singing ability?]]

Added DiffLines:

** Indeed, in the scene where Elrond read the moon letters, both Gandalf and Thorin are said to be a bit grumpy that the elf just happened to find out by dumb luck and thus got the credit for being clever.

Added DiffLines:


[[folder: The Nazgûl]]
* In the film, the Necromancer appears to raise the Nazgûl from tombs. Hang on... they never actually died, right? So why were they inside tombs? Ones in Mirkwood, even! If they did "die", it would have been at the War of the Last Alliance, so who dragged their nonexistent bodies from Mordor to Mirkwood?
[[/folder]]

Added DiffLines:

*** Like maybe the key and the map that would let Thrain's son sneak back into Erebor the back way. Gandalf did say specifically that Thrain was a witless prisoner of the Necromancer at the time, and could not remember anything but the map and key - which he probably fixated on as the one thing he had to keep from Sauron.

Added DiffLines:

** Also, given that Middle Earth is supposed to be the history of our world (and that Tolkien was a Christian and Eru is sort-of the Christian God) it could be argued Judas's future actions could still be the reason for 13 being considered unlucky, even before they'd actually happened. Tolkien's friend C.S.Lewis used a similar argument to explain why pagan mythologies often seemed to come close to certain Christian ideas.

Added DiffLines:

*** Tolkien also put an in-universe explanation in ''The Lord of the Rings'' for the differences between the first edition of ''The Hobbit'' and the revised version. The first version is the story Bilbo put in his memoirs when he was at least partially under the influence of the Ring and was trying to strengthen his claim to it. The second version is the more accurate version, probably written by Frodo.


** Gandalf is a big believer in doing what feels right rather than what makes intellectual sense. It pays off for him wonderfully every time he does it.



*** Bilbo calls the Arkenstone his share when he presents it to Bard and Thranduil. He is effectively giving up his claim in the hopes of resolving the conflict. In any case, it seems unlikely that Thorin would have gone along with Bilbo saying "give me my share and I'll go give it to the armies outside, and then we can avert this war." Thorin does agree to give one-fourteenth share for the Arkenstone but he never intended to fulfill that bargain. He has the dwarves shoot at the messengers sent to see if the one-fourteenth share had been made ready.



** The dwarves also make it clear that they don't know exactly when Durin's day will occur anymore, so they don't know exactly what date the door will be visible.



** The map can be read perfectly fine. And neither Elrond nor anyone else knew that there were moon-letters on the map; it was a lucky coincidence that he got to read the map on the date and under the conditions on which the letters would be visible.
* Is there some particular reason they couldn't have just opened the door and waited for Gandalf, THE WIZARD, to show up so they had some vague hope of facing a dragon? They just had to OPEN the door on Durin's Day, there's no reason they couldn't have camped out right there until Gandalf came back.

to:

** The In the book the map can be read perfectly fine. And neither Elrond nor anyone else knew that there were moon-letters on the map; it was a lucky coincidence that he got to read the map on the date and under the conditions on which the letters would be visible.
* Is there some particular reason they couldn't have just opened the door and waited for Gandalf, THE WIZARD, to show up so they had some vague hope of facing a dragon? They just had to OPEN the door on Durin's Day, there's no reason they couldn't have camped out right there until Gandalf came back. back?

Added DiffLines:

** That's one possible origin for considering 13 unlucky, but no one seems really clear on whether it's the only explanation. Pre-Christian mathematicians really liked 12, with its easily-divisible nature (12 months and a 12 hour clock both pre-date Christianity), so 13 might have been seen as unlucky in ancient cultures simply because it was one more than the "perfect" number.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 419

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report