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* Toward the end of the RS saga, it's stated (by Juan IIRC) that the Hoenn Gym Leaders are stronger than Ruby and Sapphire. How does that make sense? Sapphire defeated most of them, and in a flashback from before the saga even started, Norman (said by many to be the strongest Leader) states that Ruby had surpassed him.

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* Toward the end of the RS saga, it's stated (by Juan IIRC) that the Hoenn Gym Leaders are stronger than Ruby and Sapphire. How does that make sense? Sapphire defeated most of them, and in a flashback from before dating back to the saga even started, beginning of the saga, Norman (said by many to be the strongest Leader) states that Ruby had surpassed him.

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* Toward the end of the RS saga, it's stated (by Juan IIRC) that the Hoenn Gym Leaders are stronger than Ruby and Sapphire. How does that make sense? Sapphire defeated most of them, and in a flashback from before the saga even started, Norman (said by many to be the strongest Leader) states that Ruby had surpassed him.


*** Were the personalities of all the rivals in Special really more interesting and varied? Wally lost his ambition for becoming the Champion and proving himself. Instead, he only wanted to catch a Pokémon and become a trainer so that he would have friends. Even when he helped Norman with Rayquaza, he did so for the sake of helping him. The aspect of wanting to prove himself was never brought up. Meanwhile, Silver... What ''was'' his personality in the manga? I honestly couldn't tell. He was as one-track minded as his game self (replace "being the strongest" with "bringing Mask of Ice down"), but unlike his game self, his characterization gave off very little personality. And he lost his character development from the games. Even leaving aside later games that expanded on his character and motivations, Silver displayed clear character arc in GSC. He was a guy who was obsessed with becoming strong and viewed affection as a sign of weakness, so he treated Pokémon as tools. Until he ran into Lance, who curbstomped him and called him out for his methods. Meeting a trainer who cared about Pokémon yet was so much stronger than made him realize that true strength isn't about an abusive jerk and crushing everyone else, prompting him to start changing his ways. On the other hand, what development did manga!Silver get between his debut and the end of the GSC saga? There was a brief scene with Lance criticizing Silver for his treatment of his Pokémon, but [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment nothing came out of it,]] and it felt extraneous, as manga!Silver had never displayed his "Pokémon are tools" view from the games.

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*** Were the personalities of all the rivals in Special really more interesting and varied? Wally lost his ambition for becoming the Champion and proving himself. Instead, he only wanted to catch a Pokémon and become a trainer so that he would have friends. Even when he helped Norman with Rayquaza, he did so for the sake of helping him. The aspect of wanting to prove himself was never brought up. Meanwhile, Silver... What ''was'' his personality in the manga? I honestly couldn't tell. He was as one-track minded as his game self (replace "being the strongest" with "bringing Mask of Ice down"), but unlike his game self, his characterization gave off very little personality. And he lost his character development from the games. Even leaving aside later games that expanded on his character and motivations, Silver displayed a clear character arc in GSC. He was a guy who was obsessed with becoming strong and viewed affection as a sign of weakness, so he treated Pokémon as tools. Until he ran into Lance, who curbstomped him and called him out for his methods. Meeting a trainer who cared about Pokémon yet was so much stronger than him made him realize that true strength isn't about an abusive jerk and crushing everyone else, prompting him to start changing his ways. On the other hand, what development did manga!Silver get between his debut and the end of the GSC saga? There was a brief scene with Lance criticizing Silver for his treatment of his Pokémon, but [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment nothing came out of it,]] it, and it the scene felt extraneous, extraneous,]] as manga!Silver had never displayed his "Pokémon are tools" view from the games.


*** Were the personalities of all the rivals in Special really more interesting and varied? Wally lost his ambition for becoming the Champion and proving himself. Instead, he only wanted to catch a Pokémon and become a trainer so that he would have friends. Even when he helped Norman with Rayquaza, he did so for the sake of helping him, not because he wanted to prove himself. Meanwhile, Silver... What ''was'' his personality in the manga? I couldn't tell. He was as one-track minded as his game self (replace "becoming the strongest" with "defeating Mask of Ice"), but unlike his game self, his characterization gave off very little personality. And he lost his character development from the games. Even leaving aside later games that expanded on his character and motivations, Silver displayed clear character development in GSC. He was a guy who was obsessed with becoming strong and viewed affection as a sign of weakness, so he treated Pokémon as tools. Until he ran into Lance, who curbstomped him and called him out for his methods. Meeting a trainer who cared about Pokémon yet was so much stronger than made him realize that true strength isn't about an abusive jerk and crushing everyone else, prompting him to start changing his ways. On the other hand, what development did manga!Silver get between his debut and the end of the GSC saga? There was a brief scene with Lance criticizing Silver for his treatment of his Pokémon, but [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment nothing came out of it,]] and it felt extraneous, as manga!Silver had never displayed his "Pokémon are tools" view from the games.

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*** Were the personalities of all the rivals in Special really more interesting and varied? Wally lost his ambition for becoming the Champion and proving himself. Instead, he only wanted to catch a Pokémon and become a trainer so that he would have friends. Even when he helped Norman with Rayquaza, he did so for the sake of helping him, not because he wanted him. The aspect of wanting to prove himself.himself was never brought up. Meanwhile, Silver... What ''was'' his personality in the manga? I honestly couldn't tell. He was as one-track minded as his game self (replace "becoming "being the strongest" with "defeating "bringing Mask of Ice"), Ice down"), but unlike his game self, his characterization gave off very little personality. And he lost his character development from the games. Even leaving aside later games that expanded on his character and motivations, Silver displayed clear character development arc in GSC. He was a guy who was obsessed with becoming strong and viewed affection as a sign of weakness, so he treated Pokémon as tools. Until he ran into Lance, who curbstomped him and called him out for his methods. Meeting a trainer who cared about Pokémon yet was so much stronger than made him realize that true strength isn't about an abusive jerk and crushing everyone else, prompting him to start changing his ways. On the other hand, what development did manga!Silver get between his debut and the end of the GSC saga? There was a brief scene with Lance criticizing Silver for his treatment of his Pokémon, but [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment nothing came out of it,]] and it felt extraneous, as manga!Silver had never displayed his "Pokémon are tools" view from the games.

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*** Were the personalities of all the rivals in Special really more interesting and varied? Wally lost his ambition for becoming the Champion and proving himself. Instead, he only wanted to catch a Pokémon and become a trainer so that he would have friends. Even when he helped Norman with Rayquaza, he did so for the sake of helping him, not because he wanted to prove himself. Meanwhile, Silver... What ''was'' his personality in the manga? I couldn't tell. He was as one-track minded as his game self (replace "becoming the strongest" with "defeating Mask of Ice"), but unlike his game self, his characterization gave off very little personality. And he lost his character development from the games. Even leaving aside later games that expanded on his character and motivations, Silver displayed clear character development in GSC. He was a guy who was obsessed with becoming strong and viewed affection as a sign of weakness, so he treated Pokémon as tools. Until he ran into Lance, who curbstomped him and called him out for his methods. Meeting a trainer who cared about Pokémon yet was so much stronger than made him realize that true strength isn't about an abusive jerk and crushing everyone else, prompting him to start changing his ways. On the other hand, what development did manga!Silver get between his debut and the end of the GSC saga? There was a brief scene with Lance criticizing Silver for his treatment of his Pokémon, but [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment nothing came out of it,]] and it felt extraneous, as manga!Silver had never displayed his "Pokémon are tools" view from the games.


*** While they do have personalities, they aren't exactly the most interesting and, more importantly, varied personalities. As most of the game character arcs have have a simple end goal (get stronger, get nicer, etc.) while PokeSpe tries to keep their characters personalities and fates more open ended cause they return often in future arcs.




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** He didn't. Steam from Poli with the electricity from Pika created the thundercloud that Saur lured Charizard into.


* Stuff he does in a Tough Contest will be written off as part of the performance, ergo fake, ergo not especially frightening to anyone. Plenty of actors play villainous or violent roles on stage or on TV, but that woud hardly be a reason to fear them in real life.

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* ** Stuff he does in a Tough Contest will be written off as part of the performance, ergo fake, ergo not especially frightening to anyone. Plenty of actors play villainous or violent roles on stage or on TV, but that woud hardly be a reason to fear them in real life.

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* Stuff he does in a Tough Contest will be written off as part of the performance, ergo fake, ergo not especially frightening to anyone. Plenty of actors play villainous or violent roles on stage or on TV, but that woud hardly be a reason to fear them in real life.

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* If Ruby doesn't want people to see him when he's in his "serious battler mode" for fear of making others scared of him, how come he has no reservation about showing his "tough" side during Tough contests?

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* In the GSC saga we first see Jasmine in Ecruteak City. There's an abrupt earthquake and the ground opens under her feet, causing her to fall down a fissure. Then the next time we see her, she's at the Tin Tower. Um, what?


*** "not even the rivals and pseudo-rivals are given much personality to begin with in the games" < Um, what? Rivals tend to have some of the most defined personalities in the games. Blue is an arrogant jackass who loves to brag about his superiority, Silver is a jerk who (initially) sees Pokémon as nothing but tools and hates weakness, Wally is a sickly boy who wants to prove himself, and so on.




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*** Not really. Outside of player characters, characters in the games have their own personalities. And even counting only player characters, their actions contradict their manga personalities, such as Ruby being interested in collecting contest ribbons instead of gym badges.


*** Blue is the color officially attributed to Pokémon Crystal, just like red is to Pokémon Red, blue to Pokémon Blue, and so on. So Crystal's eyes ''do'' match her name.

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*** Blue is the color officially attributed to Pokémon Crystal, just like red is to Pokémon Red, blue to Pokémon Blue, and so on. It's also common for artists in general to color glass and crystal objects blue. So yes, Crystal's eyes ''do'' match her name.

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*** Blue is the color officially attributed to Pokémon Crystal, just like red is to Pokémon Red, blue to Pokémon Blue, and so on. So Crystal's eyes ''do'' match her name.

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* I can hardly forgive Ruby, but how did Sapphire not recognize Ruby from the past? He even wore that same weird cap!
** It's likely that there are a number of other trainers with caps of similar nature who passed through Littleroot during her years as Birch's assistant. The identifying feature are the scars above his left eye, as he revealed near the end of the RS arc.
*** You also forget, watching your (admittedly, very new) friend get slashed across the face is a pretty traumatic experience. Combined with the fact that it happened about half their lifetimes ago, it's possible that they only remember the basic event, forgetting the finer details. To them, it's probably like "I remember really liking this person, but I don't really remember much about it". It's the same way in that you might remember hanging out with a person at summer camp without remembering names or faces.


* How is Red's victory in the Pokemon League legal? He had three Pokemon out at the same time, and all of them contribuited to the victory.

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* How is Red's victory in the Pokemon League legal? He had three Pokemon out at the same time, and all of them contribuited contributed to the victory.


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** Perhaps she was more focused on supporting Team Magma, who helped her try to revive the volcano that was killed. That's one way spite Team Aqua.

* During the Ruby/Sapphire arc, Hoenn was in mortal danger because of Kyogre and Groudon's fighting. Why, then, did Norman make Wally fight his way up 50 or so crumbling floors, which could not have taken a small amount of time, so he could help summon Rayquaza? Why not just fly him up there, as Norman was pretty clearly able to do so with that Flygon he had? I know, RuleOfCool and all, but it just seems like it was a big waste of time.
** The point was not to get to the top of the tower directly, as it would be a big waste of time. Norman was intent on ''training'' Wally instead, and a do-or-die scenario was the best he could do given the circumstances. If Wally couldn't rise to the challenge, he couldn't succeed as a trainer, end of story, and Norman has been shown to be the TrainingFromHell kind of guy.
*** WhatTheHellHero! TrainingFromHell is bad and all, but to stake the entire world on that? That's a bit too far, and Norman should've known that. If the entire world was in danger and you only had so much time before everything went ka-boom, would you rather risk your butt climbing up 50 floors and waste a whole lot of time or even lose all the time you had, or fly up there in a fraction of the time and save the effort and the world?
*** Something along the lines of "that storm's too powerful, so we can't fly to Rayquaza, and I can't do it alone without a child's help, so I need to make you and your Pokémon strong enough to get up to the top." Makes sense if you think about it that way.
*** True; the fact that a sickly boy like Wally would've never had the physical stamina to make it if it wasn't for having to fight through all those floors is legitimate. Of course, Ruby would've probably had to do the same thing, so it's kinda unjustified. Nevertheless, not counting the fact that Rayquaza is summoned, it's all for naught in Wally's case, as he ends up presumably dead, Grovyle gets stolen by Guile, [[DeusExMachina Celebi]] teleports Ruru back to Ruby, and [[OriginalGeneration Emerald]] shows up to overwrite Wally's existence in the end, a la [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse the GS Ball.]]
*** This may be a bit late, but the whole story is out. Wally is needed because the final roadblocks to Rayquaza shut out pokemon and adults. The first roadblock is a beam that repels pokemon so you can simply smuggle them in their pokeballs. However, the second roadblock is a tunnel that is so small that even Wally could barely squeeze through with his small size. Said tunnel must be pulled open at all times by a strong enough individual via heavy chains. This combination forces only small children to get to Rayquaza. Even Norman said that this was why he couldn't do this by himself when he first found it. Also, Wally is still alive and personally gave Ruru back to Ruby as of Emerald arc.

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