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** The response was probably waiting for the crew when they awoke and helped explain WTF had happened to their ship. And it's a colony world... colonists probably accepted that there wasn't going to be much in the way of return mail, the ability to send and receive messages is probably more a psychological soother.



** I assumed the idea was that she'd be taking the Avalon itself back to Earth; presumably a ship of that size was capable of being repurposed rather than just being a 'one-trick pony' that could only take them to Homestead II.

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** I assumed the idea was that she'd be taking the Avalon itself back to Earth; presumably a ship of that size was capable of being repurposed rather than just being a 'one-trick pony' that could only take them to Homestead II.II.
** It would probably spend most of that year being serviced, and then Aurora would return with it to Earth, where it would likely again be serviced and, if necessary, upgraded before being loaded up with more colonists. Because yeah there's no way that they spent that much money on the thing to disassemble it for spare parts when it gets where it's going.

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*** I think you're struggling to resolve some idealistic view of engineers as prescient tech-gods with the reality that not everything can be planned for and eventually you run out of redundancies, and an event you couldn't possibly have planned for can still happen.


* Aurora's plan is to spend 1 year on Homestead 2, then head back to Earth. Doesn't that imply there is a 2nd ship making the trip just 1 year behind Avalon? Why couldn't they have messaged that ship for help?

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* Aurora's plan is to spend 1 year on Homestead 2, then head back to Earth. Doesn't that imply there is a 2nd ship making the trip just 1 year behind Avalon? Why couldn't they have messaged that ship for help?help?
** I assumed the idea was that she'd be taking the Avalon itself back to Earth; presumably a ship of that size was capable of being repurposed rather than just being a 'one-trick pony' that could only take them to Homestead II.



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** If the ''Avalon'' is modeled after cruise ships, this means that meals in the main dining room would be included in the price of each passenger's ticket with choices limited by fare tier. As on real cruises, they'd have to pay extra for everything consumed outside of the main dining room, creating additional income for the operator.


** On a related note, if he ''really'' hated the breakfast menu, why couldn't he order an extra portion of something ''with another meal'' and then save it for next morning? The autochef's repertoire was presumably extensive enough to allow some lunch and dinner options that'd be reasonable breakfast fare (yogurt, sausage, hard-boiled eggs), and a suite as fancy as the one he broke into is bound to have the equivalent of a mini-fridge and microwave. For that matter, why couldn't he order bot-delivered room service and charge it to the ''room's'' account rather than his own?

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** On a related note, if he ''really'' hated the breakfast budget-breakfast menu, why couldn't he order an extra a double portion of something food ''with another meal'' meal'', and then save some of it for next morning? The autochef's repertoire was presumably extensive enough to allow some lunch and dinner options that'd be reasonable breakfast fare (yogurt, sausage, hard-boiled eggs), and a suite as fancy as the one he broke into is bound to have the equivalent of a mini-fridge and microwave. For that matter, why couldn't he order bot-delivered room service each morning, and charge it to the ''room's'' account of ''the room's intended occupant'' rather than his own?
own? Or, heck, just sleep in and ''skip'' breakfast: it's not like he's got any morning appointments he's going to miss.



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** On a related note, if he ''really'' hated the breakfast menu, why couldn't he order an extra portion of something ''with another meal'' and then save it for next morning? The autochef's repertoire was presumably extensive enough to allow some lunch and dinner options that'd be reasonable breakfast fare (yogurt, sausage, hard-boiled eggs), and a suite as fancy as the one he broke into is bound to have the equivalent of a mini-fridge and microwave. For that matter, why couldn't he order bot-delivered room service and charge it to the ''room's'' account rather than his own?


* When Jim tried send a message back to Homestead about waking up too early, he was told that it'd take 55 years to get a response. Two questions: one, what happened to that response; and two, if Jim was only a fraction of the distance from Earth and it took 55 whopping years, then surely it would take even longer in 90 years when people actually were supposed to be awake? The messaging system seems rather pointless when passengers and crew can expect a reply that only their children might be able to hear.

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* When Jim tried send a message back to Homestead about waking up too early, he was told that it'd take 55 years to get a response. Two questions: one, what happened to that response; and two, if Jim was only a fraction of the distance from Earth and it took 55 whopping years, then surely it would take even longer in 90 years when people actually were supposed to be awake? The messaging system seems rather pointless when passengers and crew can expect a reply that only their children might be able to hear.hear.

* Aurora's plan is to spend 1 year on Homestead 2, then head back to Earth. Doesn't that imply there is a 2nd ship making the trip just 1 year behind Avalon? Why couldn't they have messaged that ship for help?



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** Even ignoring outside influences, internal system problems would still happen. Machines would eventually break. Code is going to go bad somewhere. With so many moving parts, inevitably something is going to fall apart. Logistically, it'd make more sense to have a skeleton crew wake up on the regular to verify diagnostics and do a once-over of the ship.





* Homestead was stated to have made 8 quadrillion on a distant planet. How does it work with a 60 year long delay in money transfer?

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** Possibly ''Avalon'' had made such observational flybys on its way out of the solar system, allowing a few top-tier passengers to gawk at Jupiter or Saturn on their outward voyage before joining the low- and mid-grade passengers in hibernation. Jim found out about this at some point, and instructed the ship's systems to clue him in if it passed near anything worth looking at.

* Homestead was stated to have made 8 quadrillion on a distant planet. How does it work with a 60 year long 60-year-long delay in money transfer?



*** Nah, it was explained that they essentially take 10% from all the passengers after they colonized the world - i.e. a tax on their lifetime income, which is basically amortized from year 120 to year 150 after selling the tickets. They also sold Aurora a ''return trip'' ticket - she's not getting back to Earth for 240 years. The Homestead corporation simply takes a very long view on finances and probably aren't worried about quarterly reports the same way modern corporations do. You can even begin to see the stretch today - Car companies are now wiling to have 7-8 year financing deals, no payments for X months, etc. etc... things that would have seemed like financial suicide a few decades ago. A long-running corporation that is capable of waiting out that delay before income is fine as long as they ensure they have enough current income to operate that way and are patient enough for the future returns. It's implied that they do this regularly, with many many planets, so they definitely have a humongous steady supply of income (possibly from earlier-colonized, nearby planets).
** Unfortunately the whole economics angle of the colonization completely falls apart at the slightest scrutiny. The colony is 240 years round trip away from earth so there is no way to realize any investment no matter how long term the company plans. They say they're going to tax 10% of the colonists income, but what will they collect that income in? The colony has no existing economy, there is no currency there to collect. They could create one, but with such a distance, the currency is effectively valueless on earth. They could pay them in earth currency, but that would mean shipping it out there with the ship, which seems kind of pointless. The only conceivable way to earn a profit would be to transport some commodity back to earth that when sold covers the massive cost of the colony ship and generates enough profit to justify the venture (similar to the old British East Indies Company or Dutch East Indies Company).
* The cyborg bartender seems to have as much intelligence as Data from Star Trek. He can fully interact with humans, and even give relationship advice. If artificial intelligence is so advanced, then why only use it on a bartender? Why not have a intelligent robot pilot? An intelligent robot doctor? Or better yet, an intelligent robot repair crew? Why not have a full robot staff on stand-by to be able to deal with any emergencies without having to wake the crew?

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*** Nah, it was explained that they essentially take 10% from all the passengers after they colonized the world - i.e. a tax on their lifetime income, which is basically amortized from year 120 to year 150 after selling the tickets. They also sold Aurora a ''return trip'' ticket - she's not getting back to Earth for 240 years. The Homestead corporation simply takes a very long view on finances and probably aren't worried about quarterly reports the same way modern corporations do. You can even begin to see the stretch today - Car companies are now wiling willing to have 7-8 year financing deals, no payments for X months, etc. etc, etc... things that would have seemed like financial suicide a few decades ago. A long-running corporation that is capable of waiting out that delay before income is fine as long as they ensure they have enough current income to operate that way and are patient enough for the future returns. It's implied that they do this regularly, with many many planets, so they definitely have a humongous steady supply of income (possibly from earlier-colonized, nearby planets).
** Unfortunately the whole economics angle of the colonization completely falls apart at the slightest scrutiny. The colony is 240 years round trip away from earth so there is no way to realize any investment no matter how long term the company plans. They say they're going to tax 10% of the colonists income, but what will they collect that income in? The colony has no existing economy, there is no currency there to collect. They could create one, but with such a distance, the currency is effectively valueless on earth. They could pay them in earth Earth currency, but that would mean shipping it out there with the ship, which seems kind of pointless. The only conceivable way to earn a profit would be to transport some commodity back to earth Earth that when sold covers the massive cost of the colony ship and generates enough profit to justify the venture (similar to the old British East Indies Company or Dutch East Indies Company).
Company).

* The cyborg robot bartender seems to have as much intelligence as Data from Star Trek.''Star Trek''. He can fully interact with humans, and even give relationship advice. If artificial intelligence is so advanced, then why only use it on a bartender? Why not have a intelligent robot pilot? An intelligent robot doctor? Or better yet, an intelligent robot repair crew? Why not have a full robot staff on stand-by to be able to deal with any emergencies without having to wake the crew?



*** I think he's more intelligent then you give him credit for. He had problems handling the LogicBomb because he's not programmed to be anything but a bartender. Not knowing how the ship works or being programmed to understand how things could go wrong with it, it makes sense he would be baffled by the notion of the ship not doing what it is supposed to do. But when it comes to what he was actually programmed to do, he handles it with near-human intelligence. He isn't just throwing out nice-sounding words, he's fully interacting with humans and even giving them sound advice. He reminded me a lot of Vic Fontaine from Star Trek Deep Space 9.

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*** I think he's more intelligent then you give him credit for. He had problems handling the LogicBomb because he's not programmed to be anything but a bartender. Not knowing how the ship works or being programmed to understand how things could go wrong with it, it makes sense he would be baffled by the notion of the ship not doing what it is supposed to do. But when it comes to what he was actually programmed to do, he handles it with near-human intelligence. He isn't just throwing out nice-sounding words, he's fully interacting with humans and even giving them sound advice. He reminded me a lot of Vic Fontaine from Star Trek ''Star Trek: Deep Space 9.9''.









* As I understand it from the film, the Avalon's computer is quite intelligent. The reason for all of the various failures is that the computer is taking processing power from less critical systems to compensate for damage to the reactor control system. Essentially, the computer is smart enough to realize that the reactor control is damaged, that it cannot fix this damage, but that it can prolong the ship's functioning by using additional resources to pick up the slack. But we're supposed to believe that, despite being that intelligent, the computer is not smart enough to realize that the only way to actually fix this situation is to ''wake up the crew''?

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** More likely, the installation of a re-hibernation platform in orbit is a routine chore in prepping a planet for colonization, same as mapping it or assessing its soil quality. All of which are presumably done by robots that have no need to return to Earth when their work is done, they just send back information and confirm that it's ready.

* As I understand it from the film, the Avalon's ''Avalon'''s computer is quite intelligent. The reason for all of the various failures is that the computer is taking processing power from less critical systems to compensate for damage to the reactor control system. Essentially, the computer is smart enough to realize that the reactor control is damaged, that it cannot fix this damage, but that it can prolong the ship's functioning by using additional resources to pick up the slack. But we're supposed to believe that, despite being that intelligent, the computer is not smart enough to realize that the only way to actually fix this situation is to ''wake up the crew''?


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** He probably enjoyed the interaction inherent in the 'Dance off' program more than the solitude of swimming or lifting weights. The guy spent a year with nobody to talk to but a robot bartender; dancing with holograms afforded the same illusion of human contact. Same deal for the basketball sim.





** The ship is essentially a giant traveling hotel. Complementary breakfast is probably an automatic inclusion in the ticket price - content to be dictated by your travel grade - whereas other meals are individually charged to the passenger's account. It's just like any RealLife hotel that comps a breakfast, then offers lunch and dinner for separate purchase at its restaurant. Jim paid for the budget ticket, so he gets the budget hotel-caliber comp.



** The ship is essentially a giant traveling hotel. Complementary breakfast is probably an automatic inclusion in the ticket price - content to be dictated by your travel grade - whereas other meals are individually charged to the passenger's account. It's just like any RealLife hotel that comps a (rudimentary) breakfast, then offers lunch and dinner for separate purchase at its restaurant.

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** The ship is essentially a giant traveling hotel. Complementary breakfast is probably an automatic inclusion in the ticket price - content to be dictated by your travel grade - whereas other meals are individually charged to the passenger's account. It's just like any RealLife hotel that comps a (rudimentary) breakfast, then offers lunch and dinner for separate purchase at its restaurant.








** OK then, what about a [[spoiler: '' fourth'' option: hibernate a year at a time, each. Take turns, spending one day together or so every year, then switch off. Age 44 years each and there's plenty of time left together when they get to Homestead.]]

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** Considering how we never see the autodoc ''successfully'' treat someone's injury or illness, it's anyone's guess how quickly it'd be able to deal with a heart attack, broken arm, appendicitis, etc. Could be that the ship only needed one autodoc because it only takes the thing a few minutes to treat a patient, so even in a worst-case scenario where several people fell ill simultaneously, the amount of time they'd spend waiting their turn for treatment won't make a difference.

*
OK then, what about a [[spoiler: '' fourth'' option: hibernate a year at a time, each. Take turns, spending one day together or so every year, then switch off. Age 44 years each and there's plenty of time left together when they get to Homestead.]]



** If the ship carries spare parts for every piece of equipment, why can't Jim the GadgeteerGenius build himself a second autodoc?

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**
*
If the ship carries spare parts for every piece of equipment, why can't Jim the GadgeteerGenius build himself a second autodoc?


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* When Jim tried send a message back to Homestead about waking up too early, he was told that it'd take 55 years to get a response. Two questions: one, what happened to that response; and two, if Jim was only a fraction of the distance from Earth and it took 55 whopping years, then surely it would take even longer in 90 years when people actually were supposed to be awake? The messaging system seems rather pointless when passengers and crew can expect a reply in never.

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* When Jim tried send a message back to Homestead about waking up too early, he was told that it'd take 55 years to get a response. Two questions: one, what happened to that response; and two, if Jim was only a fraction of the distance from Earth and it took 55 whopping years, then surely it would take even longer in 90 years when people actually were supposed to be awake? The messaging system seems rather pointless when passengers and crew can expect a reply in never.that only their children might be able to hear.


*** Or there might not be such a subroutine at all, given what we're shown about the ''Titanic''-level arrogance of the builders, who treat "this hasn't happened before" as "this can't possibly ever happen".

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*** Or there might not be such a subroutine at all, given what we're shown about the ''Titanic''-level arrogance of the builders, who treat "this hasn't happened before" as "this can't possibly ever happen".happen".
* When Jim tried send a message back to Homestead about waking up too early, he was told that it'd take 55 years to get a response. Two questions: one, what happened to that response; and two, if Jim was only a fraction of the distance from Earth and it took 55 whopping years, then surely it would take even longer in 90 years when people actually were supposed to be awake? The messaging system seems rather pointless when passengers and crew can expect a reply in never.

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