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** This is just speculation, but it could be that she goes by "Artesian" but her legal first name starts with a B.

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** This is just speculation, but it could be that she goes by "Artesian" but her legal first name starts with a B.B.

*Wouldn't the prison authorities have advised Lorna that her baby had died? I would think the hospital would have her information on file and contacted Litchfield to let them know an inmate's child had died.


* Why does it say "B. McCullough" on McCullough's uniform shirt, even though her first name is Artesian?

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* Why does it say "B. McCullough" on McCullough's uniform shirt, even though her first name is Artesian?Artesian?
** This is just speculation, but it could be that she goes by "Artesian" but her legal first name starts with a B.



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** The fact it was Fischer who was on guard duty probably helped as well. She was so concerned with Rosa's well being that she probably just signed off on the gas used without really stopping to work it out.


** Healy broke several rules by sending Piper to the SHU, so it's understandable that Caputo would want to return her to a 'normal' prison life as quickly as possible to avoid any further complications. Additionally, the rest of the staff apart from Healy knew that Piper hadn't actually done anything wrong, so decided not to remove her privileges. Watson is a little more complicated, but it could be that there's a grace period where being sent to SHU when you're relatively new to the prison means you don't lose your job/uniform on returning. Or perhaps the same works for your first visit to SHU.

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** Healy broke several rules by sending Piper to the SHU, so it's understandable that Caputo would want to return her to a 'normal' prison life as quickly as possible to avoid any further complications. Additionally, the rest of the staff apart from Healy knew that Piper hadn't actually done anything wrong, so decided not to remove her privileges. Watson is a little more complicated, but it could be that there's a grace period where being sent to SHU when you're relatively new to the prison means you don't lose your job/uniform on returning. Or perhaps the same works for your first visit to SHU.SHU.

* Why does it say "B. McCullough" on McCullough's uniform shirt, even though her first name is Artesian?


* Why is it in episode 1 of season 1, Nicky comes back from SHU and is processed back in like a newbie (orange uniform, sleeping in the rooms, not the dorms etc), but when Watson and Chapman both go and return, in the same season, they both return straight into the dorms, with their usual beige uniforms and keep their jobs? Watson tells Chapman she goes straight back to dorms since there was a bunk free, but that doesnít explain the uniform issue. We donít know how long Nicky was in there but Watson was there for 2 weeks, and Chapman less than 48 hours - so it canít be an issue of time spent there, a season surely 2 weeks would warrant putting her back in orange, even if Chapmans less than 48 hours doesnít.

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* Why is it in episode 1 of season 1, Nicky comes back from SHU and is processed back in like a newbie (orange uniform, sleeping in the rooms, not the dorms etc), but when Watson and Chapman both go and return, in the same season, they both return straight into the dorms, with their usual beige uniforms and keep their jobs? Watson tells Chapman she goes straight back to dorms since there was a bunk free, but that doesnít explain the uniform issue. We donít know how long Nicky was in there but Watson was there for 2 weeks, and Chapman less than 48 hours - so it canít be an issue of time spent there, a season surely 2 weeks would warrant putting her back in orange, even if Chapmans less than 48 hours doesnít.doesnít.
** Healy broke several rules by sending Piper to the SHU, so it's understandable that Caputo would want to return her to a 'normal' prison life as quickly as possible to avoid any further complications. Additionally, the rest of the staff apart from Healy knew that Piper hadn't actually done anything wrong, so decided not to remove her privileges. Watson is a little more complicated, but it could be that there's a grace period where being sent to SHU when you're relatively new to the prison means you don't lose your job/uniform on returning. Or perhaps the same works for your first visit to SHU.


* Lorna Morello does not seem to be particularly techno-savvy. She did not even know what Pinterest was, and did not seem to do online stalking other than through email and Facebook. She does not seem to be particularly into gadgets- and other than the make-up, she does not really MacGyver anything. How in the world did Christopher MacLaren know that it was Lorna Morello who put that homemade explosive under Angela's car? It does not seem like something she would be able to come up with. Or was she found "not guilty" of this particular charge due to that exact same reason, and thus was convicted only of the lesser charges of mail order fraud and perhaps stalking and harassment?

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* Lorna Morello does not seem to be particularly techno-savvy. She did not even know what Pinterest was, and did not seem to do online stalking other than through email and Facebook. She does not seem to be particularly into gadgets- and other than the make-up, she does not really MacGyver {{MacGyver|ing}} anything. How in the world did Christopher MacLaren know that it was Lorna Morello who put that homemade explosive under Angela's car? It does not seem like something she would be able to come up with. Or was she found "not guilty" of this particular charge due to that exact same reason, and thus was convicted only of the lesser charges of mail order fraud and perhaps stalking and harassment?


** I don't think it's fair to say that it's idiotic for them to do the show. It's just a school production and they should be able to do what they like. That's like saying it's idiotic for a school with mostly black students to do Les Mis. The problem isn't with the students doing the musical in and of itself. If there were more black students at the school and they wanted to do Dream Girls, but no black people auditioned or wanted to be a part of it, I don't think the situation would be looked upon as badly. The real issue is the dynamics of the school.

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** I don't think it's fair to say that it's idiotic for them to do the show. It's just a school production and they should be able to do what they like. That's like saying it's idiotic for a school with mostly black students to do Les Mis. The problem isn't with the students doing the musical in and of itself. If there were more black students at the school and they wanted to do Dream Girls, but no black people auditioned or wanted to be a part of it, I don't think the situation would be looked upon as badly. The real issue is the dynamics of the school.school and how it reflects the community and promotes ignorance.

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**** Exactly. They didn't care.


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** I don't think it's fair to say that it's idiotic for them to do the show. It's just a school production and they should be able to do what they like. That's like saying it's idiotic for a school with mostly black students to do Les Mis. The problem isn't with the students doing the musical in and of itself. If there were more black students at the school and they wanted to do Dream Girls, but no black people auditioned or wanted to be a part of it, I don't think the situation would be looked upon as badly. The real issue is the dynamics of the school.



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***Question answered in Season 6. She cut a deal to get to minimum.



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*** Aleida says multiple times she went to prison to take the heat for Cesar, and after he gets arrested, she is sure heíll get off, because he has done so in the past and has really good laywers.




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** Frieda was in Max. She tells Red during season 4 (with the whole dead body thing) that she ďcanít go back to max, she just canítĒ. And Piper tells Soso in season 2 (when Soso asks about all the older women in prison) that Ďa lot of them are doing long stints, and many came up from Max for good behaviourí.

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*** It was birdshot that she used. Not the most lethal ammo.


** It's also because most jurisdictions have pretty strict rules on sentencing around mental illness (to avoid someone from gaming the system by committing a crime and then claiming insanity to get an 'easier' sentence). There's quite a lot to it, but generally, the principle is that even if you're mentally ill in some way, if you're sufficiently sane enough to realise that what you did was a crime and have an understanding of the consequences of your actions then you can be tried as normal, so to speak, since you are sufficiently mentally sound to be able to take responsibility for your actions. In Morello's case, while she clearly has issues presumably she was sufficiently aware that planting a bomb in someone's car (which incidentally is kind of stretching the definition of "relatively harmless" a little, but that's another discussion) is still a crime and could have killed him to make a guilty plea and sentencing on the basis of diminished responsibility out of reach.

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** It's also because most jurisdictions have pretty strict rules on sentencing around mental illness (to avoid someone from gaming the system by committing a crime and then claiming insanity to get an 'easier' sentence). There's quite a lot to it, but generally, the principle is that even if you're mentally ill in some way, if you're sufficiently sane aware enough to realise that what you did was a crime and have an a clear understanding of the consequences of your actions then you can be tried as normal, so to speak, since you are sufficiently considered mentally sound enough to be able to take at least some responsibility for your actions. In Morello's case, while she clearly has issues presumably she was sufficiently aware demonstrated enough awareness that planting a bomb in someone's car (which incidentally is kind of stretching the definition of "relatively harmless" a little, but that's another discussion) is still a crime and could have killed him to make a guilty plea and sentencing on the basis of diminished responsibility out of reach.


** It's also because most jurisdictions have pretty strict rules on sentencing around mental illness (to avoid someone from gaming the system by committing a crime and then claiming insanity to get an 'easier' sentence). There's quite a lot to it, but generally, the principle is that even if you're mentally ill in some way, if you're sufficiently sane enough to realise that what you did was a crime and have an understanding of the consequences of your actions then you can be tried as normal, so to speak. In Morello's case, while she clearly has issues presumably she was sufficiently aware that planting a bomb in someone's car (which incidentally is kind of stretching the definition of "relatively harmless" a little, but that's another discussion) is still a crime and could have killed him to make a guilty plea and sentencing on the basis of diminished responsibility out of reach.

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** It's also because most jurisdictions have pretty strict rules on sentencing around mental illness (to avoid someone from gaming the system by committing a crime and then claiming insanity to get an 'easier' sentence). There's quite a lot to it, but generally, the principle is that even if you're mentally ill in some way, if you're sufficiently sane enough to realise that what you did was a crime and have an understanding of the consequences of your actions then you can be tried as normal, so to speak.speak, since you are sufficiently mentally sound to be able to take responsibility for your actions. In Morello's case, while she clearly has issues presumably she was sufficiently aware that planting a bomb in someone's car (which incidentally is kind of stretching the definition of "relatively harmless" a little, but that's another discussion) is still a crime and could have killed him to make a guilty plea and sentencing on the basis of diminished responsibility out of reach.



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** It's also because most jurisdictions have pretty strict rules on sentencing around mental illness (to avoid someone from gaming the system by committing a crime and then claiming insanity to get an 'easier' sentence). There's quite a lot to it, but generally, the principle is that even if you're mentally ill in some way, if you're sufficiently sane enough to realise that what you did was a crime and have an understanding of the consequences of your actions then you can be tried as normal, so to speak. In Morello's case, while she clearly has issues presumably she was sufficiently aware that planting a bomb in someone's car (which incidentally is kind of stretching the definition of "relatively harmless" a little, but that's another discussion) is still a crime and could have killed him to make a guilty plea and sentencing on the basis of diminished responsibility out of reach.

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