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** Those changes are nothing compared to their change in ''Crystal Bearers''. Apparently, the Lilties went though a huge evolution in the 1,000 year gap between games. Now, very few retain the short and stout look from the original. Many of the guards look more like giant ogres! Also, the eldery Lilties look eerily like Oogie Boogie from TheNightmareBeforeChristmas!

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** Those changes are nothing compared to their change in ''Crystal Bearers''. Apparently, the Lilties went though a huge evolution in the 1,000 year gap between games. Now, very few retain the short and stout look from the original. Many of the guards look more like giant ogres! Also, the eldery Lilties look eerily like Oogie Boogie from TheNightmareBeforeChristmas! WesternAnimation/TheNightmareBeforeChristmas!



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** You can complete the game in at least five in-game years (any time you replay a stage you have collected myrrh from for grinding does not count towards your yearly timer, this helps a bit if you can't get anyone else to play with you), but by that point, you should have pieced together all of Gurdy's encounters [[spoiler: (his passages are clues of what you need to do in Leuda Desert in order to get the unknown element and get to Mount Vellenge)]] and witnessed some of the Black Knight encounters.


* The whole premise of a second-year dungeon in the first game known as Moschet Manor. It's a mansion inhabited by a monster couple that aren't causing any trouble whatsoever; they're minding their own business and getting ready to enjoy a nice meal, that is whenever their chefs get around to finishing the cooking. Then along comes the player, breaking into their house, killing off all their staff, stealing whatever treasures they can find and basically beating up the wife and running the husband out of his house. Textbook example of WhatMeasureIsANonhuman.
** Well, barging into their house uninvited does seem both rude and uncalled for (though it could be that the player character simply thought it was another dungeon instead of someone's home), but think about it from the character's point of view. They've come into this place, and realised that the people here are more intelligent than most creatures. Before you can ask nicely if you can get a bit of chalice from the giant tree growing in their house, every single creature instinctively [[EverythingTryingToKillYou tries to kill you on sight]]. Either they're disproportionately angry about someone barging in without knocking the door, in which case the character is still acting in self defence, or they're ''worse'' than the other monsters you face because they're smart enough to live like a human but still want to kill you just because.
** Just because these creatures are smarter does not mean they can speak, and attempts to communicate an order to leave can be interpreted as a sign of imminent attack. This is a case of WeCouldHaveAvoidedAllThis, as there is a perfectly acceptable possibility of negotiation with monsters as intelligent as these if the player had just knocked on the door. After all, no monster will actually attack you unless you come too close. Then again, it's not like Jacques Moschet and his Lamia wife were in the best of moods at the time...

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* The whole premise of a second-year dungeon in the first game known as Moschet Manor. It's a mansion inhabited by a monster couple that aren't causing any trouble whatsoever; they're minding their own business and getting ready to enjoy a nice meal, that is whenever their chefs get around to finishing the cooking. Then along comes the player, breaking into their house, killing off all their staff, stealing whatever treasures they can find and basically beating up the wife and running the husband out of his house. Textbook example of WhatMeasureIsANonhuman.
** Well, barging into their house uninvited does seem both rude and uncalled for (though it could be that the player character simply thought it was another dungeon instead of someone's home), but think about it from the character's point of view. They've come into this place, and realised that the people here are more intelligent than most creatures. Before you can ask nicely if you can get a bit of chalice from the giant tree growing in their house, every single creature instinctively [[EverythingTryingToKillYou tries to kill you on sight]]. Either they're disproportionately angry about someone barging in without knocking the door, in which case the character is still acting in self defence, or they're ''worse'' than the other monsters you face because they're smart enough to live like a human but still want to kill you just because.
** Just because these creatures are smarter does not mean they can speak, and attempts to communicate an order to leave can be interpreted as a sign of imminent attack. This is a case of WeCouldHaveAvoidedAllThis, as there is a perfectly acceptable possibility of negotiation with monsters as intelligent as these if the player had just knocked on the door. After all, no monster will actually attack you unless you come too close. Then again, it's not like Jacques Moschet and his Lamia wife were in the best of moods at the time...

Added DiffLines:

** Just because these creatures are smarter does not mean they can speak, and attempts to communicate an order to leave can be interpreted as a sign of imminent attack. This is a case of WeCouldHaveAvoidedAllThis, as there is a perfectly acceptable possibility of negotiation with monsters as intelligent as these if the player had just knocked on the door. After all, no monster will actually attack you unless you come too close. Then again, it's not like Jacques Moschet and his Lamia wife were in the best of moods at the time...

Added DiffLines:

** Well, barging into their house uninvited does seem both rude and uncalled for (though it could be that the player character simply thought it was another dungeon instead of someone's home), but think about it from the character's point of view. They've come into this place, and realised that the people here are more intelligent than most creatures. Before you can ask nicely if you can get a bit of chalice from the giant tree growing in their house, every single creature instinctively [[EverythingTryingToKillYou tries to kill you on sight]]. Either they're disproportionately angry about someone barging in without knocking the door, in which case the character is still acting in self defence, or they're ''worse'' than the other monsters you face because they're smart enough to live like a human but still want to kill you just because.

Added DiffLines:

*The whole premise of a second-year dungeon in the first game known as Moschet Manor. It's a mansion inhabited by a monster couple that aren't causing any trouble whatsoever; they're minding their own business and getting ready to enjoy a nice meal, that is whenever their chefs get around to finishing the cooking. Then along comes the player, breaking into their house, killing off all their staff, stealing whatever treasures they can find and basically beating up the wife and running the husband out of his house. Textbook example of WhatMeasureIsANonhuman.

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** Since the plot is mainly explained through Random Encounters on the road, there's no way to tell how long to wait, though usually it's a while (and it doesn't help that there's quite a few subplots that are explained erratically or just [[GuideDangIt plain hard]] to activate the cutscenes for). Really, the first dungeon crawl that directly links to the plot is the second time going through Veo Lu Sluice to refill the river so you can get to Leuda.

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* Exactly how long do you have to play the first game before a plot begins to amass? Is there even a plot, or am I just traveling the world looking for shiny water?

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** One of the games notes parallel dimensions exist, and then makes a vague reference to another game. The implication is pretty clear, but it just seems the series is pretty half assed about timelines and such.

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