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**** So why does Buddy Repperton smashing in Christine's headlight cause [=LeBay=]'s eye to get done in? I don't think I've seen any satisfying explanation for that.


*** It's pretty clearly implied that it's always been [=LeBay=]'s will possessing Christine and not Christine acting on her own. Early in the novel [=LeBay=] isn't seen driving her, but Dennis sees him driving her in his dreams. His will is in there, but it's not physically visible yet. As the story goes on and [=LeBay=]'s will and control over the car and Arnie gets stronger, his presence becomes visible more and more often.

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*** It's pretty clearly implied that it's always been [=LeBay=]'s will possessing Christine and not Christine acting on her own. Early in the novel [=LeBay=] isn't seen driving her, but Dennis sees him driving her in his dreams. His will is in there, but it's not physically visible yet. As the story goes on and [=LeBay=]'s will and control over the car and Arnie gets get stronger, his presence becomes visible more and more often.


*** It's pretty clearly implied that it's always been LeBay's will possessing Christine and not Christine acting on her own. Early in the novel LeBay isn't seen driving her, but Dennis sees him driving her in his dreams. His will is in there, but it's not physically visible yet. As the story goes on and LeBay's will and control over the car and Arnie gets stronger, his presence becomes visible more and more often.

to:

*** It's pretty clearly implied that it's always been LeBay's [=LeBay=]'s will possessing Christine and not Christine acting on her own. Early in the novel LeBay [=LeBay=] isn't seen driving her, but Dennis sees him driving her in his dreams. His will is in there, but it's not physically visible yet. As the story goes on and LeBay's [=LeBay=]'s will and control over the car and Arnie gets stronger, his presence becomes visible more and more often.

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*** It's pretty clearly implied that it's always been LeBay's will possessing Christine and not Christine acting on her own. Early in the novel LeBay isn't seen driving her, but Dennis sees him driving her in his dreams. His will is in there, but it's not physically visible yet. As the story goes on and LeBay's will and control over the car and Arnie gets stronger, his presence becomes visible more and more often.


*** The direct above was how this Troper read it. Especially since there was a moment, right before LeBay sold the car to Arnie, where Dennis has a "vision" where Christine is new and "talks" to him in his mind, while giving him an idea to go cruising in her.

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*** The direct above was how this Troper read it. Especially since there was a moment, right before LeBay [=LeBay=] sold the car to Arnie, where Dennis has a "vision" where Christine is new and "talks" to him in his mind, while giving him an idea to go cruising in her.

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*** The direct above was how this Troper read it. Especially since there was a moment, right before LeBay sold the car to Arnie, where Dennis has a "vision" where Christine is new and "talks" to him in his mind, while giving him an idea to go cruising in her.


** In the book, it's implied that Roland [=LeBay=] put Christine in the garage when he lost his ability to drive. And then took her out again and put the FOR SALE sign on, conveniently at the right time (just before Arnie came along), when his intuition or instinct told him to. Remember that the car is invested with [=LeBay's=] personal malevolence (an aspect of the book that's not in the movie; in the movie she's "bad to the bone" before [=LeBay=] ever gets hold of her)--without [=LeBay=], Christine would just be another '58 Fury. [=LeBay=] controls Christine, even after his death--she does ''not'' control herself. And [=LeBay=] didn't know who threw the rock at her windshield, so he couldn't take revenge on whoever did it. One final thing on this: there's nothing in the book to suggest that Christine is driving around and killing people until ''after [=LeBay=] is dead.'' The book flatly states that [=LeBay's=] evil spirit has possessed Arnie, and (according to Arnie's own words), "when she goes, he's with her." None of the killing is ''really'' being done by the car itself--[=LeBay's=] ghost is doing it.

to:

** In the book, it's implied that Roland [=LeBay=] put Christine in the garage when he lost his ability to drive. And then took her out again and put the FOR SALE sign on, conveniently at the right time (just before Arnie came along), when his intuition or instinct told him to. Remember that the car is invested infused with [=LeBay's=] personal malevolence (an aspect of the book that's not in the movie; in the movie she's "bad to the bone" before [=LeBay=] ever gets hold of her)--without [=LeBay=], Christine would just be another '58 Fury. [=LeBay=] controls Christine, even after his death--she does ''not'' control herself. And [=LeBay=] didn't know who threw the rock at her windshield, so he couldn't take revenge on whoever did it. One final thing on this: there's nothing in the book to suggest that Christine is driving around and killing people until ''after [=LeBay=] is dead.'' The book flatly states that [=LeBay's=] evil spirit has possessed Arnie, and (according to Arnie's own words), "when she goes, he's with her." None of the killing is ''really'' being done by the car itself--[=LeBay's=] ghost is doing it.

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****I got the impression that the wife's death was either murder or suicide, but I'm sure that the daughter was all but explicitly implied to be [=LeBay=] 'sacrificing' her to Christine to imbue her with power.


*** Most of these examples take place pretty early in the book, and can be chalked up to assumptions and inaccurate perceptions. As Dennis learns more, and the book continues, it becomes quite clear that [=LeBay=] is behind the wheel when Christine is driving "on her own". In fact, with the exception of one event, everything would fit real nicely with the idea that Christine was just an ordinary car, that LeBay was obsessed with until his death - where his spirit took control of both the car and Arnie. Possibly Arnie, and his own obsession with the car, acted as a conduit for LeBay's spirit. The one thing that doesn't quite fit, is the story involving [=LeBay=]'s American Legion incident - where Christine somehow was able to drive away with her rear tires up in the air - when [=LeBay=] was still alive. Even the deaths of [=LeBay=]'s wife and daughter were heavily implied to be murder, and the result of [=LeBay=]'s apathy respectively.

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*** Most of these examples take place pretty early in the book, and can be chalked up to assumptions and inaccurate perceptions. As Dennis learns more, and the book continues, it becomes quite clear that [=LeBay=] is behind the wheel when Christine is driving "on her own". In fact, with the exception of one event, everything would fit real nicely with the idea that Christine was just an ordinary car, that LeBay with which [=LeBay=] was obsessed with until his death - where his spirit took control of both the car and Arnie. Possibly Arnie, and his own obsession with the car, acted as a conduit for LeBay's [=LeBay=]'s spirit. The one thing that doesn't quite fit, is the story involving [=LeBay=]'s American Legion incident - where Christine somehow was able to drive away with her rear tires up in the air - when [=LeBay=] was still alive. Even the deaths of [=LeBay=]'s wife and daughter were heavily implied to be murder, and the result of [=LeBay=]'s apathy respectively.


** In the book, it's implied that Roland [=LeBay=] put Christine in the garage when he lost his ability to drive. And then took her out again and put the FOR SALE sign on, conveniently at the right time (just before Arnie came along), when his intuition or instinct told him to. Remember that the car is invested with [=LeBay's=] personal malevolence (an aspect of the book that's not in the movie; in the movie she's "bad to the bone" before [=LeBay=] ever gets ahold of her)--without [=LeBay=], Christine would just be another '58 Fury. [=LeBay=] controls Christine, even after his death--she does ''not'' control herself. And [=LeBay=] didn't know who threw the rock at her windshield, so he couldn't take revenge on whoever did it. One final thing on this: there's nothing in the book to suggest that Christine is driving around and killing people until ''after [=LeBay=] is dead.'' The book flatly states that [=LeBay's=] evil spirit has possessed Arnie, and (according to Arnie's own words), "when she goes, he's with her." None of the killing is ''really'' being done by the car itself--[=LeBay's=] ghost is doing it.

to:

** In the book, it's implied that Roland [=LeBay=] put Christine in the garage when he lost his ability to drive. And then took her out again and put the FOR SALE sign on, conveniently at the right time (just before Arnie came along), when his intuition or instinct told him to. Remember that the car is invested with [=LeBay's=] personal malevolence (an aspect of the book that's not in the movie; in the movie she's "bad to the bone" before [=LeBay=] ever gets ahold hold of her)--without [=LeBay=], Christine would just be another '58 Fury. [=LeBay=] controls Christine, even after his death--she does ''not'' control herself. And [=LeBay=] didn't know who threw the rock at her windshield, so he couldn't take revenge on whoever did it. One final thing on this: there's nothing in the book to suggest that Christine is driving around and killing people until ''after [=LeBay=] is dead.'' The book flatly states that [=LeBay's=] evil spirit has possessed Arnie, and (according to Arnie's own words), "when she goes, he's with her." None of the killing is ''really'' being done by the car itself--[=LeBay's=] ghost is doing it.



*** There are other examples, but it seems in the novel that [=LeBay=] and Christine both had what you might describe as "extraordinary" qualities that were perhaps greater together than the sum of their parts...and perhaps Arnie had something of this too, at least enough for [=LeBay=]'s discorporated spirit to exploit.
*** Most of these examples take place pretty early in the book, and can be chalked up to assumptions and inaccurate perceptions. As Dennis learns more, and the book continues, it becomes quite clear that LeBay is behind the wheel when Christine is driving "on her own". In fact, with the exception of one event, everything would fit real nicely with the idea that Christine was just an ordinary car, that LeBay was obsessed with until his death - where his spirit took control of both the car and Arnie. Possibly Arnie, and his own obsession with the car, acted as a conduit for LeBay's spirit. The one thing that doesn't quite fit, is the story involving LeBay's American Legion incident - where Christine somehow was able to drive away with her rear tires up in the air - when LeBay was still alive. Even the deaths of LeBay's wife and daughter were heavily implied to be murder, and the result of LeBay's apathy respectively.
*** For the book, it could be possible that Christine was both a haunted house on wheel and a vehicle with a conscious. It could even be possible that Christine was alive and that she was keeping [=LeBay=] alive herself, basically absorbing his soul into her after he passed.

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*** There are other examples, but it seems in the novel that [=LeBay=] and Christine both had what you might describe as "extraordinary" qualities that were perhaps greater together than the sum of their parts... and perhaps Arnie had something of this too, at least enough for [=LeBay=]'s discorporated spirit to exploit.
*** Most of these examples take place pretty early in the book, and can be chalked up to assumptions and inaccurate perceptions. As Dennis learns more, and the book continues, it becomes quite clear that LeBay [=LeBay=] is behind the wheel when Christine is driving "on her own". In fact, with the exception of one event, everything would fit real nicely with the idea that Christine was just an ordinary car, that LeBay was obsessed with until his death - where his spirit took control of both the car and Arnie. Possibly Arnie, and his own obsession with the car, acted as a conduit for LeBay's spirit. The one thing that doesn't quite fit, is the story involving LeBay's [=LeBay=]'s American Legion incident - where Christine somehow was able to drive away with her rear tires up in the air - when LeBay [=LeBay=] was still alive. Even the deaths of LeBay's [=LeBay=]'s wife and daughter were heavily implied to be murder, and the result of LeBay's [=LeBay=]'s apathy respectively.
*** For the book, it could be possible that Christine was both a haunted house on wheel and a vehicle with a conscious. It could even be possible that Christine was alive and that she was keeping [=LeBay=] alive herself, basically absorbing his soul into her after he passed.passed.
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**** Most of these examples take place pretty early in the book, and can be chalked up to assumptions and inaccurate perceptions. As Dennis learns more, and the book continues, it becomes quite clear that LeBay is behind the wheel when Christine is driving "on her own". In fact, with the exception of one event, everything would fit real nicely with the idea that Christine was just an ordinary car, that LeBay was obsessed with until his death - where his spirit took control of both the car and Arnie. Possibly Arnie, and his own obsession with the car, acted as a conduit for LeBay's spirit. The one thing that doesn't quite fit, is the story involving LeBay's American Legion incident - where Christine somehow was able to drive away with her rear tires up in the air - when LeBay was still alive. Even the deaths of LeBay's wife and daughter were heavily implied to be murder, and the result of LeBay's apathy respectively.


*** For the book, it could be possible that Christine was both a haunted house on wheel and a vehicle with a conscious. It could even be possible that Christine was alive and that she was keeping LeBay alive herself, basically absorbing his soul into her after he passed.

to:

*** For the book, it could be possible that Christine was both a haunted house on wheel and a vehicle with a conscious. It could even be possible that Christine was alive and that she was keeping LeBay [=LeBay=] alive herself, basically absorbing his soul into her after he passed.


*** There are other examples, but it seems in the novel that [=LeBay=] and Christine both had what you might describe as "extraordinary" qualities that were perhaps greater together than the sum of their parts...and perhaps Arnie had something of this too, at least enough for [=LeBay=]'s discorporated spirit to exploit.

to:

*** There are other examples, but it seems in the novel that [=LeBay=] and Christine both had what you might describe as "extraordinary" qualities that were perhaps greater together than the sum of their parts...and perhaps Arnie had something of this too, at least enough for [=LeBay=]'s discorporated spirit to exploit.exploit.
*** For the book, it could be possible that Christine was both a haunted house on wheel and a vehicle with a conscious. It could even be possible that Christine was alive and that she was keeping LeBay alive herself, basically absorbing his soul into her after he passed.


** In the book, it's implied that Roland [=LeBay=] put Christine in the garage when he lost his ability to drive. And then took her out again and put the FOR SALE sign on, conveniently at the right time (just before Arnie came along), when his intuition or instinct told him to. Remember that the car is invested with [=LeBay's=] personal malevolence (an aspect of the book that's not in the movie; in the movie she's "bad to the bone" before [=LeBay=] ever gets ahold of her)--without [=LeBay=], Christine would just be another '58 Fury. [=LeBay=] controls Christine, even after his death--she does ''not'' control herself. And [=LeBay=] didn't know who threw the rock at her windshield, so he couldn't take revenge on whoever did it. One final thing on this: there's nothing in the book to suggest that Christine is driving around and killing people until ''after [=LeBay=] is dead.'' The book flatly states that [=LeBay's=] evil spirit has possessed Arnie, and (according to Arnie's own words), "when she goes, he's with her." None of the killing is ''really'' being done by the car itself--[=LeBay's=] ghost is doing it.

to:

** In the book, it's implied that Roland [=LeBay=] put Christine in the garage when he lost his ability to drive. And then took her out again and put the FOR SALE sign on, conveniently at the right time (just before Arnie came along), when his intuition or instinct told him to. Remember that the car is invested with [=LeBay's=] personal malevolence (an aspect of the book that's not in the movie; in the movie she's "bad to the bone" before [=LeBay=] ever gets ahold of her)--without [=LeBay=], Christine would just be another '58 Fury. [=LeBay=] controls Christine, even after his death--she does ''not'' control herself. And [=LeBay=] didn't know who threw the rock at her windshield, so he couldn't take revenge on whoever did it. One final thing on this: there's nothing in the book to suggest that Christine is driving around and killing people until ''after [=LeBay=] is dead.'' The book flatly states that [=LeBay's=] evil spirit has possessed Arnie, and (according to Arnie's own words), "when she goes, he's with her." None of the killing is ''really'' being done by the car itself--[=LeBay's=] ghost is doing it.it.
*** The whole "was Christine really alive in the novel?" point has been debated a lot on various sites and forums, with some believing that Christine wasn't "conscious" at all in the book, and that everything she did Roland [=LeBay=] was actually responsible for. From this viewpoint, [=LeBay=] simply used the car as a sort of "doorway" back from death to possess Arnie. However, there are many indications in the novel that Christine had a personality and will of her own. Please see below:
***"Christine or the terrible female force that animated her would know Leigh wouldn't last long and she, Christine, would be around when Leigh was gone."
***In the below excerpt, she is clearly acting under her own agency. No sign or mention of [=LeBay=] at all:
***"By nine-thirty, when Christine's headlights suddenly came on in Will Darnell's deserted garage, cutting a bright arc through the interior blackness, Libertyville had totally shut down, except for the occasional cruising ploughs. In the silent garage, Christine's engine gunned and fell off. Gunned and fell off. In the empty front seat, the gearshift lever dropped down into DRIVE. Christine began to move."
***There are other examples, but it seems in the novel that [=LeBay=] and Christine both had what you might describe as "extraordinary" qualities that were perhaps greater together than the sum of their parts...and perhaps Arnie had something of this too, at least enough for [=LeBay=]'s discorporated spirit to exploit.


* How did it benefit Christine to let [=LeBay=] wheel her into the garage and let her rot, forgotten, for years? It seems odd that she'd permit him to do so and this troper can't think of a single advantage to her. Likewise, given her rage when thwarted or given even minimal insult, why would she let someone throw a rock at her windscreen without meting out punishment?

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* How did it benefit Christine to let [=LeBay=] wheel her into the garage and let her rot, forgotten, for years? It seems odd that she'd permit him to do so and this troper I can't think of a single advantage to her. Likewise, given her rage when thwarted or given even minimal insult, why would she let someone throw a rock at her windscreen without meting out punishment?

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