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* ''WesternAnimation/ParaNorman'': Oh boy, there's a lot. Zombies come back from the dead to wreak havoc on a sleepy town thanks to a witch's curse. Except the witch was an innocent little girl, the zombies are completely harmless and rather pathetic compared to anything in Norman's horror movies, and the town uses the little girl's trial and hanging to pull in tourists and sell cheesy merchandise.

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* ''Film/WhenTrumpetsFade'' does this to World War II war films. However, it goes further in not only showing that WarIsHell, but ditching many tropes such as the [[FireForgedFriends Fire-Forged]] BandOfBrothers ultimately prevailing against all odds. Manning has only his own survival at stake, and will happily sacrifice his men to save himself. There's nothing glorious about the battle of Hurtgen Forest, which is mostly forgotten.


* ''Disney/EducationForDeath'': The film is a deconstruction of [[WartimeCartoon Wartime Cartoons]]. It avoids portraying Nazis as evil monsters, and demonstrates ''how'' a normal, compassionate young child can be trained into following such a cause: propaganda and [[PeerPressureMakesYouEvil peer pressure]]. By the end of the film, you end up [[TearJerker feeling sorry for Hans and his friends as they are turned into heartless weapons for the Nazi regime and marched to their deaths in battle]].

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* ''Disney/EducationForDeath'': ''WesternAnimation/EducationForDeath'': The film is a deconstruction of [[WartimeCartoon Wartime Cartoons]]. It avoids portraying Nazis as evil monsters, and demonstrates ''how'' a normal, compassionate young child can be trained into following such a cause: propaganda and [[PeerPressureMakesYouEvil peer pressure]]. By the end of the film, you end up [[TearJerker feeling sorry for Hans and his friends as they are turned into heartless weapons for the Nazi regime and marched to their deaths in battle]].


* "''Stahlnetz''" ("Steel Net") , a German series of MadeForTV crime movies, deconstructs PoliceProcedural. The officers are people with their own problems and shortcomings, far from being neatly divided into squeaky clean and corrupt bastards. The criminals are also realistic, many being bullied, pushed or outright coerced into crime while still being definitely bad people, whereas others are monsters, despite looking like ordinary people on the outside. Victims also come with their share of problems, some being an AssholeVictim, others being [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished punished for being nice]]. The police solves cases through hard work, including setbacks, rather than beating half the underworld. And despite each film finishing with the crime resolv and criminals caught, the realistic portrayal of both the criminals and victims means most films have a BittersweetEnding, if not a [[DownerEnding Downer]]. (Ironically the only story with a(relatively) HappyEnding is also the most brutal of all).

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* "''Stahlnetz''" ("Steel Net") , a German series of MadeForTV crime movies, deconstructs PoliceProcedural. The officers are people with their own problems and shortcomings, far from being neatly divided into squeaky clean and corrupt bastards. The criminals are also realistic, many being bullied, pushed or outright coerced into crime while still being definitely bad people, whereas others are monsters, despite looking like ordinary people on the outside. Victims also come with their share of problems, some being an AssholeVictim, others being [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished punished for being nice]]. The police solves cases through hard work, including setbacks, rather than beating half the underworld. And despite each film finishing with the crime resolv resolved and criminals caught, the realistic portrayal of both the criminals and victims means most films have a BittersweetEnding, if not a [[DownerEnding Downer]]. (Ironically the only story with a(relatively) a (relatively) HappyEnding is also the most brutal of all).


* "''Stahlnetz''" ("Steel Net") , a German series of MadeForTV crime movies, deconstructs PoliceProcedural. The officers are people with their own problems and shortcomings, far from being neatly divided into squeaky clean and corrupt bastards. The criminals are also realistic, many being bullied, pushed or outright coerced into crime while still being definitely bad people, whereas others are monsters, despite looking like ordinary people on the outside. Victims also come with their share of problems, some being an AssholeVictim, others being [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished punished for being nice]]. The police solves cases through hard work, including setbacks, rather than beating half the underworld. And despite each film finishing with the crime resolve and criminals caught, the realistic portrayal of both the criminals and victims means most films have a BittersweetEnding, if not a [[DownerEnding Downer]]. (Ironically the only story with (relatively) HappyEnding is also the most brutal of all).

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* "''Stahlnetz''" ("Steel Net") , a German series of MadeForTV crime movies, deconstructs PoliceProcedural. The officers are people with their own problems and shortcomings, far from being neatly divided into squeaky clean and corrupt bastards. The criminals are also realistic, many being bullied, pushed or outright coerced into crime while still being definitely bad people, whereas others are monsters, despite looking like ordinary people on the outside. Victims also come with their share of problems, some being an AssholeVictim, others being [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished punished for being nice]]. The police solves cases through hard work, including setbacks, rather than beating half the underworld. And despite each film finishing with the crime resolve resolv and criminals caught, the realistic portrayal of both the criminals and victims means most films have a BittersweetEnding, if not a [[DownerEnding Downer]]. (Ironically the only story with (relatively) a(relatively) HappyEnding is also the most brutal of all).


* ''Film/FallingDown'' does this to the [[VigilanteMan vigilante movie]]. William Foster is a mild-mannered white-collar worker who one day snaps in frustration at the WretchedHive he lives in, not unlike Paul Kersey in ''Film/DeathWish'' (the film adaptation, at least[[note]]The original book was [[UnbuiltTrope a lot more scathing in its portrait of vigilantism]], to the point where its author Brian Garfield {{disowned|Adaptation}} the films adapted from it.[[/note]])... but whereas Kersey's life was destroyed overnight by street crime run amok, Foster's [[RageBreakingPoint trigger]], the culmination of a months-long downward spiral after he was laid off from his job and his wife left him and [[TakingTheKids took their daughter with her]], was far more mundane, the bumper-to-bumper traffic he faced on the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles freeway in the middle of a sweltering HeatWave with his car's AC busted. While he does go after GangBangers and [[ThoseWackyNazis a neo-Nazi]] in his rampage and give a well-deserved [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech dressing down]] to a homeless PhonyVeteran, he also attacks less deserving targets like an AsianStoreOwner, the staff of a [[BurgerFool fast-food restaurant]], a group of construction workers, and ultimately his ex-wife for [[AllCrimesAreEqual various petty reasons]]. Worse, it's strongly hinted through the HappierHomeMovie we see of him and his family together that Foster ''always'' had issues with [[HairTriggerTemper anger management]], which had been [[DomesticAbuse poisoning his relationships and personal life]] even before things went downhill. Foster is ultimately presented as something more akin to a spree killer than an avenging angel, and by the time the film is over, [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist Sergeant Prendergast]] has spelled it out, in unambiguous terms, to both him and the audience: ''he's'' the bad guy.

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* ''Film/FallingDown'' does this to the [[VigilanteMan vigilante movie]]. William Foster is a mild-mannered white-collar worker who one day snaps in frustration at the WretchedHive he lives in, not unlike Paul Kersey in ''Film/DeathWish'' (the film adaptation, at least[[note]]The original book was [[UnbuiltTrope a lot more scathing in its portrait of vigilantism]], to the point where its author Brian Garfield {{disowned|Adaptation}} the films adapted from it.[[/note]])... but whereas Kersey's life was destroyed overnight by street crime run amok, Foster's [[RageBreakingPoint trigger]], the culmination of a months-long downward spiral after he was laid off from his job and his wife left him and [[TakingTheKids took their daughter with her]], was far more mundane, the bumper-to-bumper traffic he faced on the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles freeway in the middle of a sweltering HeatWave with his car's AC busted. While he does go after GangBangers and [[ThoseWackyNazis a neo-Nazi]] in his rampage and give a well-deserved [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech dressing down]] to a homeless PhonyVeteran, he also attacks less deserving targets like an AsianStoreOwner, the staff of a [[BurgerFool fast-food restaurant]], a group of construction workers, and ultimately his ex-wife for [[AllCrimesAreEqual various petty reasons]]. Worse, it's strongly hinted through the HappierHomeMovie we see of him and his family together that Foster ''always'' had issues with [[HairTriggerTemper anger management]], which had been [[DomesticAbuse poisoning his relationships and personal life]] even before things went downhill. Foster is ultimately presented as something more akin to a spree killer SpreeKiller than an avenging angel, and by the time the film is over, [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist Sergeant Prendergast]] has spelled it out, in unambiguous terms, to both him and the audience: ''he's'' the bad guy.


* ''Film/ShinGodzilla'' deconstructs AmericaSavesTheDay and {{Kaiju}} films. Japan's government is shown to be ill-prepared for Godzilla at any rate. Godzilla himself starts off as a clumsy bipedal thing with stubby arms that ''accidentally'' causes millions of dollars in collateral damage and unwittingly kills millions of people simply by flopping awkwardly down the street. Likewise, when he undergoes a TransformationSequence into his third-form, his body overheats to the point where he must return to the ocean to cool off. The JSDF are unable to provide any effective weaponry against him (and, at one point, are unable to attack because an evacuation was still ongoing). When, Godzilla reappears in his fourth form, he's clearly an abomination of nature in constant agony covered in scars and various grotesque growths on his body (his tail has a vestigial head on the tip). And, when the US Military actually ''does'' manage to harm Godzilla (using armor-piercing bombs), it only succeeds in pissing Godzilla off and causes him to unleash his full fury via atomic beams from his mouth, dorsal fins, and tail demolishing a good portion of Tokyo. In the end, Japan is force to live with Godzilla (albeit in a state of suspended animation via a coagulant forced into his body) with the knowledge that the US will not hesitate to nuke the area if Godzilla ever becomes a threat again. To say that it is ''not'' an action-packed cheesy romp with giant-sized creatures would be an understatement.

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* ''Film/Godzilla1954'' deconstructs the AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhatever NuclearNasty monster genre of the 1950s. It was originally set as your typical giant monster awaken by a nuclear testing and goes on a rampage while the main characters are trying to figure out how to defeat it to save the day. The deconstruction sets in when the [[Creator/IshiroHonda director]] sets up the entire film as a ''post-war tragedy'' based on his [[ShellShockedVeteran horrified experience of the aftermath of]] [[UsefulNotes/AtomicBombingsOfHiroshimaAndNagasaki Hiroshima's destruction]]. And thus, Godzilla is treated as a TragicMonster and a [[BodyHorror horribly radioactive burn victim]] with keloid scars, a ShellShockedVeteran scientist who has discovered a terrifying source of energy, and the underlying message of nuclear warfare bringing tragedy just like it did nine years ago.
**
''Film/ShinGodzilla'' deconstructs AmericaSavesTheDay and {{Kaiju}} films. Japan's government is shown to be ill-prepared for Godzilla at any rate. Godzilla himself starts off as a clumsy bipedal thing with stubby arms that ''accidentally'' causes millions of dollars in collateral damage and unwittingly kills millions of people simply by flopping awkwardly down the street. Likewise, when he undergoes a TransformationSequence into his third-form, his body overheats to the point where he must return to the ocean to cool off. The JSDF are unable to provide any effective weaponry against him (and, at one point, are unable to attack because an evacuation was still ongoing). When, Godzilla reappears in his fourth form, he's clearly an abomination of nature in constant agony covered in scars and various grotesque growths on his body (his tail has a vestigial head on the tip). And, when the US Military actually ''does'' manage to harm Godzilla (using armor-piercing bombs), it only succeeds in pissing Godzilla off and causes him to unleash his full fury via atomic beams from his mouth, dorsal fins, and tail demolishing a good portion of Tokyo. In the end, Japan is force to live with Godzilla (albeit in a state of suspended animation via a coagulant forced into his body) with the knowledge that the US will not hesitate to nuke the area if Godzilla ever becomes a threat again. To say that it is ''not'' an action-packed cheesy romp with giant-sized creatures would be an understatement.


* ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'' for ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' in particular and the SuperheroTropes in general.

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* ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'' ''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy'' for ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' in particular and the SuperheroTropes in general.

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* ''Film/GetCarter'' was intended to be this to the British gangster movie, and then ironically it became a classic of the same genre it was deconstructing. Watching ''Film/TheItalianJob1969'' and then ''Get Carter'', which Michael Caine made back-to-back, really highlights the stark difference in their portrayals of gangsters: in the former and many other British crime films before it, gangsters are all either stupid or funny; in ''Get Carter'', gangsters are not stupid, and [[NightmareFuel they are certainly not funny]]. Jack Carter is a remorseless, cold-blooded killing machine motivated purely by revenge against other murdering sleaze-mongers who are NotSoDifferent from him - and thus he comes across as an AntiHero. Deaths are treated matter-of-factly and there is little blood or drama (the one time blood is used copiously it's for maximum shock effect), the setting swaps glitzy London for [[OopNorth bleak Newcastle]], and there's no cheery pop soundtrack (or indeed any soundtrack at all) that defined previous flicks in the genre.


* ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' is a deconstruction of the classic Disney fairy-tale genre. It has all the classic elements: a witch-queen who places a curse on a beautiful princess and her realm, dooming both to destruction; a brave and handsome prince, beloved (at first sight) betrothed of the princess, who storms the witch-queen's enchanted castle, fighting his way past her terrifying guard-monster, to defeat the queen and break the curse; and, of course, it turns out that only an act of true love can undo all the bad mojo. It sounds like a cross between ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'' and ''Disney/SnowWhite''. Except of course that, in this film, the witch-queen is the doting and adored sister of the princess, and is an innocent victim of circumstance, who only cursed everything by [[PowerIncontinence accident]]; the handsome prince is the villain of the piece (a key plot-point is how foolish it is to fall in love with and agree to marry someone you've just met); and the act of true love is not a TrueLovesKiss, but rather the willingness of one sister to sacrifice herself for the other.


** Although it's worth pointing out that all of those things are true in the Bible as well, it's just that most people only have a [[HollywoodHistory rudimentary]] understanding of the Bible, so this might be news to them.


* ''Film/FallingDown'' does this to the [[VigilanteMan vigilante movie]]. William Foster is a mild-mannered white-collar worker who one day snaps in frustration at the WretchedHive he lives in, not unlike Paul Kersey in ''Film/DeathWish'' (the film adaptation, at least)... but whereas Kersey's life was destroyed overnight by street crime run amok, Foster's [[RageBreakingPoint trigger]], the culmination of a months-long downward spiral after he lost his job and his wife, was far more mundane, the bumper-to-bumper traffic he faced on the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles freeway. While he does go after GangBangers and [[ThoseWackyNazis a neo-Nazi]] in his rampage and give a well-deserved [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech dressing down]] to a homeless PhonyVeteran, he also attacks less deserving targets like an AsianStoreOwner, the staff of a [[BurgerFool fast-food restaurant]], a group of construction workers, and ultimately his ex-wife for [[AllCrimesAreEqual various petty reasons]]. Foster is ultimately presented as something more akin to a spree killer than an avenging angel, and by the time the film is over, [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist Sergeant Prendergast]] has spelled it out, in unambiguous terms, to both him and the audience: ''he's'' the bad guy.

to:

* ''Film/FallingDown'' does this to the [[VigilanteMan vigilante movie]]. William Foster is a mild-mannered white-collar worker who one day snaps in frustration at the WretchedHive he lives in, not unlike Paul Kersey in ''Film/DeathWish'' (the film adaptation, at least)... least[[note]]The original book was [[UnbuiltTrope a lot more scathing in its portrait of vigilantism]], to the point where its author Brian Garfield {{disowned|Adaptation}} the films adapted from it.[[/note]])... but whereas Kersey's life was destroyed overnight by street crime run amok, Foster's [[RageBreakingPoint trigger]], the culmination of a months-long downward spiral after he lost was laid off from his job and his wife, wife left him and [[TakingTheKids took their daughter with her]], was far more mundane, the bumper-to-bumper traffic he faced on the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles freeway.freeway in the middle of a sweltering HeatWave with his car's AC busted. While he does go after GangBangers and [[ThoseWackyNazis a neo-Nazi]] in his rampage and give a well-deserved [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech dressing down]] to a homeless PhonyVeteran, he also attacks less deserving targets like an AsianStoreOwner, the staff of a [[BurgerFool fast-food restaurant]], a group of construction workers, and ultimately his ex-wife for [[AllCrimesAreEqual various petty reasons]]. Worse, it's strongly hinted through the HappierHomeMovie we see of him and his family together that Foster ''always'' had issues with [[HairTriggerTemper anger management]], which had been [[DomesticAbuse poisoning his relationships and personal life]] even before things went downhill. Foster is ultimately presented as something more akin to a spree killer than an avenging angel, and by the time the film is over, [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist Sergeant Prendergast]] has spelled it out, in unambiguous terms, to both him and the audience: ''he's'' the bad guy.


* ''Film/FallingDown'' does this to the [[VigilanteMan vigilante movie]]. William Foster is a mild-mannered white-collar worker who one day snaps in frustration at the WretchedHive he lives in, not unlike Paul Kersey in ''Film/DeathWish'' (the film adaptation, at least)... but whereas Kersey's life was destroyed overnight by street crime run amok, Foster's [[RageBreakingPoint trigger]], the culmination of a months-long downward spiral after he lost his job and his wife, was far more mundane, the bumper-to-bumper traffic he faced on the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles freeway. While he does go after GangBangers and [[ThoseWackyNazis a neo-Nazi]] in his rampage and give a well-deserved [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech dressing down]] to a homeless PhonyVeteran, he also attacks less deserving targets like an AsianStoreOwner, the staff of a [[BurgerFool fast-food restaurant]], a group of construction workers, and ultimately his ex-wife for [[AllCrimesAreEqual various petty reasons]]. Foster is ultimately presented as something more akin to a spree killer than an avenging angel, and by the time the film is over, [[HeroAntagonist Sergeant Prendergast]] has spelled it out, in unambiguous terms, to both him and the audience: ''he's'' the bad guy.

to:

* ''Film/FallingDown'' does this to the [[VigilanteMan vigilante movie]]. William Foster is a mild-mannered white-collar worker who one day snaps in frustration at the WretchedHive he lives in, not unlike Paul Kersey in ''Film/DeathWish'' (the film adaptation, at least)... but whereas Kersey's life was destroyed overnight by street crime run amok, Foster's [[RageBreakingPoint trigger]], the culmination of a months-long downward spiral after he lost his job and his wife, was far more mundane, the bumper-to-bumper traffic he faced on the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles freeway. While he does go after GangBangers and [[ThoseWackyNazis a neo-Nazi]] in his rampage and give a well-deserved [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech dressing down]] to a homeless PhonyVeteran, he also attacks less deserving targets like an AsianStoreOwner, the staff of a [[BurgerFool fast-food restaurant]], a group of construction workers, and ultimately his ex-wife for [[AllCrimesAreEqual various petty reasons]]. Foster is ultimately presented as something more akin to a spree killer than an avenging angel, and by the time the film is over, [[HeroAntagonist [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist Sergeant Prendergast]] has spelled it out, in unambiguous terms, to both him and the audience: ''he's'' the bad guy.


* For the ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'' movie, Creator/ZackSnyder said his intention wasn't to translate the comic's deconstruction of comic book conventions to comic book movies, but by its nature elements of this certainly crept in. Rorschach's voice is about the most extreme PrivateEyeMonologue you can imagine, especially as this movie was made in the wake of ''Film/TheDarkKnight'' and talk of Christian Bale's [[GutturalGrowler absurdly low and scratchy]] Batman voice. The costumes of the 1940s heroes are generally made of cloth and leather while the 1980s heroes wear latex and rubber suits, which reflects the changing pattern of Hollywood superhero costumes. Ozymandias' outfit in particular has [[FormFittingWardrobe sculpted nipples]], a reference to the infamous designs in ''Film/BatmanAndRobin''. The violence level is also ramped up.

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