Follow TV Tropes

Following

History FridgeHorror / Literature

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* Fridge/PerdidoStreetStation


** Even more fridge horror kicks in when you realize that in our own universe, up until very recently, sexism, racism, classism, and ableism pretty much controlled who got an education and who didnít, and still hold undue influence over it. How much knowledge and technology are ''we'' missing?

to:

** Even more fridge horror kicks in when you realize that in our own universe, up until very recently, sexism, racism, classism, and ableism and income inequality pretty much controlled who got an education and who didnít, and still hold undue influence over it. How much knowledge and technology are ''we'' missing?


* ''Missing'' by James Duffy is a children's book about a 10-year-old girl being abducted by a stranger who has been stalking her for some time. The girl has a history of running away from home (to escape her parents' abusive marriage; in one instance she just wanted to visit her grandparents) so the police don't believe she is in danger, and casually remark that she'll turn up when she wants to. There's some ValuesDissonance here due to the book being set in the early 1980s, and it's made clear to the child audience that the girl ''is'' in no danger - the man has no sexual interest in her and doesn't want to harm her, he intends her to replace his daughter whom he lost in a custody battle. All the same, the entire story is full of terrifying implications for an older reader.

to:

* ''Missing'' by James Duffy is a children's book about a 10-year-old girl being abducted by a stranger who has been stalking her for some time. The girl has a history of running away from home (to escape her parents' abusive marriage; in one instance she just wanted to visit her grandparents) so the police don't believe she is in danger, and casually remark that she'll turn up when she wants to. There's some ValuesDissonance here due to the book being set in the early 1980s, and it's made clear to the child audience that the girl ''is'' in no danger - the man has no sexual interest in her and doesn't want to harm her, he intends her to replace his daughter whom he lost in a custody battle. All the same, the entire story is full of terrifying implications for an older reader. And nowadays, with the police being okay with it due to misinformation, it is way too close to the [[https://www.crimeonline.com/2019/06/14/horrific-abuse-stepdad-holds-stepdaughter-captive-for-20-years-fathering-9-of-her-children/ Henri Piette]] thing.

Added DiffLines:

* In Barry Lygaís novel ''The Secret Sea'', the protagonists end up in a universe where women are not allowed to vote, live on their own, go into various establishments, or (presumably) attend higher education. The female protagonist even discovers- the hard way- that women who are walking around by themselves are at risk of being kidnapped and sold at legally-sanctioned auctions. That, and difference in technology between the two universes noted by the protagonists, raises a bit of fridge horror:
** What happens to the women who are bought at auction?
** With women so carefully excluded from education, how much knowledge and scientific progress has that universe missed out on?
** Even more fridge horror kicks in when you realize that in our own universe, up until very recently, sexism, racism, classism, and ableism pretty much controlled who got an education and who didnít, and still hold undue influence over it. How much knowledge and technology are ''we'' missing?

Added DiffLines:

* Fridge/TheLordOfTheRings


* There are several disturbing aspects to stories where characters are able to transport themselves into the universes that are, from their point of view, works of fiction -- sometimes ones they wrote themselves. There's the "World as a Myth" novels of Creator/RobertAHeinlein, Greer Gilman's ''Moonwise'', and the Literature/HaroldShea stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, just to give a few examples. Heinlein managed to catch one of these disturbing aspects, namely that if fictional universes are real, [[RageAgainstTheAuthor the author is an awful person for writing a story that isn't set in a utopia.]] One other extremely disturbing implication, however, is that there have been a sizable amount of authors who hold racist beliefs, and let this influence their work. That means that if all works of fiction exist in some parallel universe somewhere, ''there must be thousands, if not millions of universes, where racist beliefs are empirically correct.'' There are universes where TheBirthOfANation is a documentary. The same goes for all sorts of other bigoted, intolerant beliefs. If anyone who held those beliefs ever wrote a story, that means that somewhere out there is a parallel universe where ''all their hateful beliefs are right.''

to:

* There are several disturbing aspects to stories where characters are able to transport themselves into the universes that are, from their point of view, works of fiction -- sometimes ones they wrote themselves. There's the "World as a Myth" novels of Creator/RobertAHeinlein, Greer Gilman's ''Moonwise'', and the Literature/HaroldShea stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, just to give a few examples. Heinlein managed to catch one of these disturbing aspects, namely that if fictional universes are real, [[RageAgainstTheAuthor the author is an awful person for writing a story that isn't set in a utopia.]] One other extremely disturbing implication, however, is that there have been a sizable amount of authors who hold racist beliefs, and let this influence their work. That means that if all works of fiction exist in some parallel universe somewhere, ''there must be thousands, if not millions of universes, where racist beliefs are empirically correct.'' There are universes where TheBirthOfANation ''Film/TheBirthOfANation1916'' is a documentary. The same goes for all sorts of other bigoted, intolerant beliefs. If anyone who held those beliefs ever wrote a story, that means that somewhere out there is a parallel universe where ''all their hateful beliefs are right.''


* There are several disturbing aspects to stories where characters are able to transport themselves into the universes that are, from their point of view, works of fiction -- sometimes ones they wrote themselves. There's the "World as a Myth" novels of Creator/RobertAHeinlein, Greer Gilman's ''Moonwise'', and the HaroldShea stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, just to give a few examples. Heinlein managed to catch one of these disturbing aspects, namely that if fictional universes are real, [[RageAgainstTheAuthor the author is an awful person for writing a story that isn't set in a utopia.]] One other extremely disturbing implication, however, is that there have been a sizable amount of authors who hold racist beliefs, and let this influence their work. That means that if all works of fiction exist in some parallel universe somewhere, ''there must be thousands, if not millions of universes, where racist beliefs are empirically correct.'' There are universes where TheBirthOfANation is a documentary. The same goes for all sorts of other bigoted, intolerant beliefs. If anyone who held those beliefs ever wrote a story, that means that somewhere out there is a parallel universe where ''all their hateful beliefs are right.''

to:

* There are several disturbing aspects to stories where characters are able to transport themselves into the universes that are, from their point of view, works of fiction -- sometimes ones they wrote themselves. There's the "World as a Myth" novels of Creator/RobertAHeinlein, Greer Gilman's ''Moonwise'', and the HaroldShea Literature/HaroldShea stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, just to give a few examples. Heinlein managed to catch one of these disturbing aspects, namely that if fictional universes are real, [[RageAgainstTheAuthor the author is an awful person for writing a story that isn't set in a utopia.]] One other extremely disturbing implication, however, is that there have been a sizable amount of authors who hold racist beliefs, and let this influence their work. That means that if all works of fiction exist in some parallel universe somewhere, ''there must be thousands, if not millions of universes, where racist beliefs are empirically correct.'' There are universes where TheBirthOfANation is a documentary. The same goes for all sorts of other bigoted, intolerant beliefs. If anyone who held those beliefs ever wrote a story, that means that somewhere out there is a parallel universe where ''all their hateful beliefs are right.''


* There exists a book intended for kids around 9-10 years old, (though this troper cannot for the life of her remember the title) about a little Jewish girl living in Germany in WWII. She and her family are sent to a concentration camp, and the book is mainly about their time in the cattle cars. At the end of the story, they reach their destination, and the girl is sent with her mother and other women and children to the showers. She is completely overjoyed to have a chance to get clean again, and the book ends with her raising her hands in anticipation, waiting for the shower to start. This in itself is pretty grim, until you realize that the protagonist is a very young girl, her mother is described as very frail, and they're surrounded by children. [[TearJerker Just... think about that for a minute.]]
** This Troper doesn't know its English title, but the German title is "Reise im August", Journey in August, by Gudrun Pausewang, the German queen of HONF.

to:

* There exists a book intended for kids around 9-10 years old, (though this troper cannot for the life of her remember the title) "The Final Journey" (in English) about a little Jewish girl living in Germany in WWII. She and her family are sent to a concentration camp, and the book is mainly about their time in the cattle cars. At the end of the story, they reach their destination, and the girl is sent with her mother and other women and children to the showers. She is completely overjoyed to have a chance to get clean again, and the book ends with her raising her hands in anticipation, waiting for the shower to start. This in itself is pretty grim, until you realize that the protagonist is a very young girl, her mother is described as very frail, and they're surrounded by children. [[TearJerker Just... think about that for a minute.]]
** This Troper doesn't know its English title, but the The German title is "Reise im August", Journey in August, by Gudrun Pausewang, the German queen of HONF.

Added DiffLines:

* Fridge/HeroesOfOlympus

Added DiffLines:

****ÖOr what if the dimension-hopping monsters ''do'' exist, but they just haven't come here ''yet''?


* Enid Blyton wrote a story called "House-At-The-Corner" about a family who have an Austrian maid, Greta. The story makes several references to Greta's family being lost, and also mentions that she used to have a twin. The book was written in [[WorldWarII 1947]]. Greta's family were killed by the Nazis.

to:

* Enid Blyton wrote a story called "House-At-The-Corner" about a family who have an Austrian maid, Greta. The story makes several references to Greta's family being lost, and also mentions that she used to have a twin. The book was written in [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII 1947]]. Greta's family were killed by the Nazis.

Added DiffLines:

* Writing about the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hartford_circus_fire 1944 Hartford, CT circus fire]], reporter Stewart O'Nan says "Several survivors said the one thing they will never forget about the circus fire as long as they live is the sound of the animals as they burned alive. But there were no animals."


* [[http://f3.tiera.ru/2/B_Biology/Smith%20T.,%20et%20al.%20(eds.)%20The%20BMA%20family%20doctor%20home%20adviser%20(Dorling%20Kindersley,%202001)(ISBN%200751321680)(319s)_B_.pdf ''The BMA Family Doctor Home Adviser'']] is a medical book created to make it easier for parents in a family household to assess whether or not their daughter's, say, rash or flu is a normal occurrence that can be cured quickly with some antibiotics or a sign of another, more serious, underlying illness by using simple charts requiring the reader to follow the charts according to the symptoms present. As all medical books are the book is very thorough, most of the articles explaining what possible illness are there depending on the symptoms. It makes you think however, when you see pages dedicated to fainting (has he or she been unconscious for more than two days?) and head trauma (has he or she suffered from a head injury in two or more days?) and fever (does he or she have a body temperature of over 38 degree Celcius?), how any sensible parent would not bring them to the doctor immediately and are conflicted enough to consult the book about it.

to:

* [[http://f3.tiera.ru/2/B_Biology/Smith%20T.,%20et%20al.%20(eds.)%20The%20BMA%20family%20doctor%20home%20adviser%20(Dorling%20Kindersley,%202001)(ISBN%200751321680)(319s)_B_.pdf ''The BMA Family Doctor Home Adviser'']] is a medical book created to make it easier for parents in a family household to assess whether or not their daughter's, say, rash or flu is a normal occurrence that can be cured quickly with some antibiotics or a sign of another, more serious, underlying illness by using simple charts requiring the reader to follow the charts according to the symptoms present. As all medical books are the book is very thorough, most of the articles explaining what possible illness are there depending on the symptoms. It makes you think however, when you see pages dedicated to fainting (has he or she been unconscious for more than two days?) and head trauma (has he or she suffered from a head injury in two or more days?) and fever (does he or she have a body temperature of over 38 degree Celcius?), degrees Celsius?), how any sensible parent would not bring them to the doctor immediately and are conflicted enough to consult the book about it. it.
** This is a matter of social class, tradition and poverty. Because doctors cost money, they're only consulted when things are dire. People used to know a lot of first aid, medicinal plants and home remedies to treat even serious illness and injury, often successfully. Detailed reference books like this, called "doctor books", were very common, and regarded as necessary and valuable as the Bible.


* Zilpha Keatley Snyder wrote fridge horror brilliance in one of her most popular novels, ''The Changeling'' (on which the ''Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy'' is based). When Ivy and Martha are seven, Ivy appears at Martha's window at midnight in the middle of a rainstorm. Martha suspects Ivy is crying, asks how she could come all that way in the dark, and Ivy buries her face in a towel for a minute before whispering "There's worse things than dark." At thirteen, Ivy furiously states "I am ''never'' going to grow up." Not just a teenager's wisdom that GrowingUpSucks, she is angry and defiant about it, not wistful or nostalgic. Asked by a neighbor what she has been doing, she says "Waiting." This was published in 1970, when sexual abuse was never referred to explicitly or even implicitly, even in young adult books.

to:

* Zilpha Keatley Snyder wrote fridge horror brilliance in one of her most popular novels, ''The Changeling'' (on which the ''Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy'' is based). When Ivy and Martha are seven, Ivy (who lives a mile or so from Martha) appears at Martha's window at midnight in the middle of a rainstorm. Martha suspects Ivy is crying, asks how she could come all that way in the dark, and Ivy buries her face in a towel for a minute before whispering "There's worse things than dark." At thirteen, Ivy furiously states "I am ''never'' going to grow up." Not just a teenager's wisdom that GrowingUpSucks, she is angry and defiant about it, not wistful or nostalgic. When Martha asks "What's wrong with being an adult?" Ivy responds furiously "If you don't know, there's no use trying to tell you." Asked by a neighbor what she has been doing, she says "Waiting." This was published in 1970, when sexual abuse was never referred to in children's literature explicitly or even implicitly, even in young adult books.

Added DiffLines:

* In Mercer Mayer's ''One Monster After Another'', after the ship that retrieved Sally Ann's letter is sunk by a Furious Floating Ice-Ferg, the ship's crew set off in a lifeboat, [[MessageInABottle leaving the letter in a bottle]], only for the entire Blue Ocean of Bubbly Goo to be sucked up by a Wild n' Windy Typhoonigator, which makes one wonder [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse what happened to the crew]].

Showing 15 edit(s) of 240

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report