Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Fridge / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

Go To



* Why does Data seem like he has very limited emotions rather than being emotionless? Because he was programmed with the same base software package Lore was! They were both the same down to every last detail, even in the baa]se software programming package. However, Dr. Soong locked the emotions part of the software behind either a firewall or password when he programmed Data. He himself said that Lore's emotions are what made him dangerous. However, if he programmed another android, with some of the base software locked out to that android, he could have a being similar to a Vulcan who's more of an observer of emotional beings and can analyze the better and worse parts of them to discern what's acceptable and not acceptable or the best behavior. The fact that Soong sent out the signal to compel Data to come to his home after hearing he has been reactivated for years leads him to believe he's had enough experience with other beings to be able to handle the emotions. This explains why Lore was able to send out his own signal to Data to spoon-feed him some of the emotions and disable his ethical subroutines. It's a lot like Dr. Zimmerman trying to alter The Doctor on ''Voyager'', only you need an actual computer to change ''him.'' Lore figured out how to reverse engineer Soong's signal with the Borg tech he acquired and learned how to give them to Data. The reason Data appears to have some base feelings over the series is that the thing blocking them started decaying over the years he was deactivated due to his aging hardware being left alone for all the years he was deactivated, or something started giving when the people who discovered him got him back online. Point is, he has base feelings, but is both unaware of them and unable to access them without the chip or something similar to it. He could've also programmed things to activate as Data got older, as evidenced in "Birthright", when a representation of a young Soong appeared to Data by accident to unlock his ability to dream and start being more expressive in his creativity. It would also explain, possibly, how Tasha Yar was able to influence his behavior with the virus from "The Naked Now."

to:

* Why does Data seem like he has very limited emotions rather than being emotionless? Because he was programmed with the same base software package Lore was! They were both the same down to every last detail, even in the baa]se base software programming package. However, Dr. Soong locked the emotions part of the software behind either a firewall or password when he programmed Data. He himself said that Lore's emotions are what made him dangerous. However, if he programmed another android, with some of the base software locked out to that android, he could have a being similar to a Vulcan who's more of an observer of emotional beings and can analyze the better and worse parts of them to discern what's acceptable and not acceptable or the best behavior. The fact that Soong sent out the signal to compel Data to come to his home after hearing he has been reactivated for years leads him to believe he's had enough experience with other beings to be able to handle the emotions. This explains why Lore was able to send out his own signal to Data to spoon-feed him some of the emotions and disable his ethical subroutines. It's a lot like Dr. Zimmerman trying to alter The Doctor on ''Voyager'', only you need an actual computer to change ''him.'' Lore figured out how to reverse engineer Soong's signal with the Borg tech he acquired and learned how to give them to Data. The reason Data appears to have some base feelings over the series is that the thing blocking them started decaying over the years he was deactivated due to his aging hardware being left alone for all the years he was deactivated, or something started giving when the people who discovered him got him back online. Point is, he has base feelings, but is both unaware of them and unable to access them without the chip or something similar to it. He could've also programmed things to activate as Data got older, as evidenced in "Birthright", when a representation of a young Soong appeared to Data by accident to unlock his ability to dream and start being more expressive in his creativity. It would also explain, possibly, how Tasha Yar was able to influence his behavior with the virus from "The Naked Now."


** The problem the Mariposans had was that no matter how careful you are, tiny genetic imperfections in the clones accumulate. Making clones from the Bringloidi would just see them having that same problem generations down the road.



* This has probably been stated elsewhere on this site, but the fact that it's not on this page itself astonishes me. Why does Data seem like he has very limited emotions rather than being emotionless? Because he was programmed with the same base software package Lore was! They were both the same down to every last detail, even in the baase software programming package. However, Dr. Soong locked the emotions part of the software behind either a firewall or password when he programmed Data. He himself said that Lore's emotions are what made him dangerous. However, if he programmed another android, with some of the base software locked out to that android, he could have a being similar to a Vulcan who's more of an observer of emotional beings and can analyze the better and worse parts of them to discern what's acceptable and not acceptable or the best behavior. The fact that Soong sent out the signal to compel Data to come to his home after hearing he has been reactivated for years leads him to believe he's had enough experience with other beings to be able to handle the emotions. This explains why Lore was able to send out his own signal to Data to spoon-feed him some of the emotions and disable his ethical subroutines. It's a lot like Dr. Zimmerman trying to alter The Doctor on ''Voyager'', only you need an actual computer to change ''him.'' Lore figured out how to reverse engineer Soong's signal with the Borg tech he acquired and learned how to give them to Data. The reason Data appears to have some base feelings over the series is that the thing blocking them started decaying over the years he was deactivated due to his aging hardware being left alone for all the years he was deactivated, or something started giving when the people who discovered him got him back online. Point is, he has base feelings, but is both unaware of them and unable to access them without the chip or something similar to it. He could've also programmed things to activate as Data got older, as evidenced in "Birthright", when a representation of a young Soong appeared to Data by accident to unlock his ability to dream and start being more expressive in his creativity. It would also explain, possibly, how Tasha Yar was able to influence his behavior with the virus from "The Naked Now."

to:

* This has probably been stated elsewhere on this site, but the fact that it's not on this page itself astonishes me. Why does Data seem like he has very limited emotions rather than being emotionless? Because he was programmed with the same base software package Lore was! They were both the same down to every last detail, even in the baase baa]se software programming package. However, Dr. Soong locked the emotions part of the software behind either a firewall or password when he programmed Data. He himself said that Lore's emotions are what made him dangerous. However, if he programmed another android, with some of the base software locked out to that android, he could have a being similar to a Vulcan who's more of an observer of emotional beings and can analyze the better and worse parts of them to discern what's acceptable and not acceptable or the best behavior. The fact that Soong sent out the signal to compel Data to come to his home after hearing he has been reactivated for years leads him to believe he's had enough experience with other beings to be able to handle the emotions. This explains why Lore was able to send out his own signal to Data to spoon-feed him some of the emotions and disable his ethical subroutines. It's a lot like Dr. Zimmerman trying to alter The Doctor on ''Voyager'', only you need an actual computer to change ''him.'' Lore figured out how to reverse engineer Soong's signal with the Borg tech he acquired and learned how to give them to Data. The reason Data appears to have some base feelings over the series is that the thing blocking them started decaying over the years he was deactivated due to his aging hardware being left alone for all the years he was deactivated, or something started giving when the people who discovered him got him back online. Point is, he has base feelings, but is both unaware of them and unable to access them without the chip or something similar to it. He could've also programmed things to activate as Data got older, as evidenced in "Birthright", when a representation of a young Soong appeared to Data by accident to unlock his ability to dream and start being more expressive in his creativity. It would also explain, possibly, how Tasha Yar was able to influence his behavior with the virus from "The Naked Now."


* In "Deja Q", [[CassandraTruth nobody believes Q]] when he tells them that he's been banished from the Q continuum and stripped of all his powers, seeking refuge aboard the ''Enterprise''. But in his last appearance in "Q Who", Q also made the claim that he'd been banished, before introducing everyone to the Borg in an incident that left at least 18 crewmen dead. [[CryingWolf So it's entirely understandable why they don't believe him this time.]]



** True but then again would he really want to admit to where they had been? He has enough trouble dealing with the pompous federation folks without them knowing where exactly he lives. The last thing Q wants or needs is Picard crashing on his metaphorical couch.

to:

** True but then again would he really want to admit to where they had been? He has enough trouble dealing with the pompous federation Federation folks without them knowing where exactly he lives. The last thing Q wants or needs is Picard crashing on his metaphorical couch.



** This does come up InUniverse in ''Voyager'' episodes like "Elogium" and "Once Upon a Time", where characters question the wisdom of raising children on a starship (not that they have much choice with little Naomi, but still...). It's as if the writers themselves are admitting that putting children on the USS ''WeirdnessMagnet'' wasn't such a good idea.

to:

** This does come up InUniverse in ''Voyager'' episodes like "Elogium" and "Once Upon a Time", where characters question the wisdom of raising children on a starship (not that they have much choice with little Naomi, but still...). It's as if the writers themselves are admitting that putting children on the USS ''USS'' ''WeirdnessMagnet'' wasn't such a good idea.


* There's a subtle tone that many miss in ''The Best of Both Worlds''. The two parter is frequently said to be the point where ''The Next Generation'' truly became equals with the original series, and became respected in its own right. It did this by not only crafting what has become a critically acclaimed story, but by choosing to tell the kind of story the original series could/would never have attempted (partially due to technology constraints of the time, partly because of the changing writing staff, and partly due to the kind of stories they told - the original series was more isolated fables, distant from earth). It's a bittersweet moment, heartwarming and half tearjerker all in one. The crew of the Enterprise D are truly their own now. And to embrace that, we have to let go of a Captain too. Just maybe not ''this'' Captain.
** Remember also that Guinan, the one giving Riker the ''you have to let him go'' speech, is played by Creator/WhoopiGoldberg, who has spoken out loud as owing her acting Career to The Original Series of Star Trek. Her love for the series is as deep as Guinan's love for Picard. Knowing this, Guinan telling Riker he has to let the man who to her is "beyond friendship, beyond family" go, takes on a much more personal meaning. TOS brought her here, but she is a part of TNG.
* If you think about it, Picard was actually doing Wesley a favor in "The First Duty". He made it clear that he knew all along Wesley and his squadron was being dishonest, and there was nothing stopping him from dragging their collective rear end to the authorities and showing them what he had found. So what does he do with this clear cut evidance? Goes and talks to the kid in private, and doesn't even start getting angry until Wesley begins trying to make excuses. Even after that, he still gives Wesley the chance to speak for himself, and it's almost a certainty they wouldn't have gone half as leniantly on him if Picard had told them rather then Wesley himself. A lot of the fandom regards this episode as a TakeThatScrappy, but this troper believes that Picard must have cared about Wesley ''a lot'' to be willing to give him the ToughLove he needed own up and not make the same mistakes Picard did in his own youth.

to:

* There's a subtle tone that many miss in ''The Best of Both Worlds''. The two parter is frequently said to be the point where ''The Next Generation'' truly became equals with the original series, and became respected in its own right. It did this by not only crafting what has become a critically acclaimed story, but by choosing to tell the kind of story the original series could/would never have attempted (partially due to technology constraints of the time, partly because of the changing writing staff, and partly due to the kind of stories they told - the original series was more isolated fables, distant from earth).Earth). It's a bittersweet moment, heartwarming and half tearjerker all in one. The crew of the Enterprise D are truly their own now. And to embrace that, we have to let go of a Captain captain too. Just maybe not ''this'' Captain.captain.
** Remember also that Guinan, the one giving Riker the ''you have to let him go'' speech, is played by Creator/WhoopiGoldberg, who has spoken out loud as owing her acting Career career to The Original Series of Star Trek. Her love for the series is as deep as Guinan's love for Picard. Knowing this, Guinan telling Riker he has to let the man who to her is "beyond friendship, beyond family" go, takes on a much more personal meaning. TOS brought her here, but she is a part of TNG.
* If you think about it, Picard was actually doing Wesley a favor in "The First Duty". He made it clear that he knew all along Wesley and his squadron was being dishonest, and there was nothing stopping him from dragging their collective rear end to the authorities and showing them what he had found. So what does he do with this clear cut evidance? evidence? Goes and talks to the kid in private, and doesn't even start getting angry until Wesley begins trying to make excuses. Even after that, he still gives Wesley the chance to speak for himself, and it's almost a certainty they wouldn't have gone half as leniantly leniently on him if Picard had told them rather then Wesley himself. A lot of the fandom regards this episode as a TakeThatScrappy, but this troper believes that Picard must have cared about Wesley ''a lot'' to be willing to give him the ToughLove he needed to own up and not make the same mistakes Picard did in his own youth.


* A civilization, knowing death was imminent, sends out a probe with memories and stories of their lives up to the end, in the form of a scientist's life. Picard experiences a fundamentally altering experience, one that he has good reasons to be emotionally uncomfortable with. But he never tells anyone. An entire civilization died and Picard, an archeologist even, is the only one who knows their story. The hopes of an entire people who get the best possible person to tell their story, and those dreams die with Picard being uncomfortable about his feelings.
** To be fair, he's a starship captain and it's a TV show. He is incredibly busy and we don't get to see everything that goes on. For all we can tell, he's been writing Caimin's memoirs throughout the entire series after his experience. The only hint we get that he hasn't done anything is his conversation with Lieutenant Darrin, and that can be explained by him not publishing much yet. If you personally retcon that one, there's no reason to think he hasn't told their story. It's not like the dying wish of a civilization is pertinent to the show outside of that one episode. He could have written the whole story and published it without it ever being mentioned again on the show.
*** He not only published, he got a movie deal. "The Inner Light" was part of it.
** Oh course he documented the civilization and his experience! We just don't get to see it all on screen. Honestly you don't have to be shown ''everything'' if you're a good and attentive audience.
** The probe was also brought on board for "further study". Someone else could have watched/experienced it during those studies.
*** It was stated at the end of the episode that the probe was not functioning anymore.
** It's one thing to discuss and document the overall nature of the civilization (at least the ending of one) such as the kind of people they were, their technology, etc. However, he likely left out his own personal experiences, his marriage and family life, and, of course, the flute he learned to play. For him, that was too intimate to share with just anyone.



** Luckily for Picard we've seen proof in the past that two-way transporting exist where both transporters at the destination and sending point activate so if one goes down the other can continue on. Starfleet seems to routinely do this whenever transporting between ships or locations where this is possible as well, hence why staff go from transporter room to transporter room not transporter room to ten-forward or anywhere else. Since he was transporting to a starfleet station presumably he would have been doing this and been picked up fully by the station transporter when power cut.
* In "Future Imperfect", Riker wakes up and finds that sixteen years of his memories were erased, and he may never get them back. Not only that he has a son, and had a wife who died two years previously. [[spoiler: it is a small consolation that the whole experience was really a holodeck simulation.]]
* After "Yesterday's Enterprise", the alternate Tasha Yar was captured by the Romulans; twenty-five years later, she has an [[IdenticalGrandson identical, half-Romulan daughter]]. Sure, it ''could've'' been AMatchMadeInStockholm, but what about the far more likely possibility that it wasn't?
** Possibility nothing. Tasha was later killed ''trying to escape''.
** [[FromBadToWorse Factor in]] [[RapeAsBackstory what was implied about Tasha's]] DarkAndTroubledPast. . .

to:

** Luckily for Picard we've seen proof in the past that two-way transporting exist where both transporters at the destination and sending point activate so if one goes down the other can continue on. Starfleet seems to routinely do this whenever transporting between ships or locations where this is possible as well, hence why staff go from transporter room to transporter room not transporter room to ten-forward or anywhere else. Since he was transporting to a starfleet Starfleet station presumably he would have been doing this and been picked up fully by the station transporter when power cut.
* In "Future Imperfect", Riker wakes up and finds that sixteen years of his memories were erased, and he may never get them back. Not only that he has a son, and had a wife who died two years previously. [[spoiler: it is a small consolation that the whole experience was really a holodeck simulation.]]
* After "Yesterday's Enterprise", the alternate Tasha Yar was captured by the Romulans; twenty-five years later, she has an [[IdenticalGrandson identical, half-Romulan daughter]]. Sure, it ''could've'' been AMatchMadeInStockholm, but what about the far more likely possibility that it wasn't?
** Possibility nothing. Tasha
Considering she was later killed ''trying trying to escape''.
** [[FromBadToWorse Factor in]] [[RapeAsBackstory what was implied about Tasha's]] DarkAndTroubledPast. . .
escape with her daughter, it probably wasn't AMatchMadeInStockholm. RapeAsBackstory is implied.



* The character Amanda was never seen again after the episode "True Q". At the end of the episode, Q takes her to the Continuum after its discovered she has Q powers. Before she leaves though, she tells Crusher she wants to come back and visit her still, and Crusher informs her she's Q and can do anything she wants. Earlier in the episode it had been brought up that she'll likely be destroyed by Q for being part-human. Q claims that won't occur, but given the character never turned up again...
* The Bynars initially seem like nothing more than a very interesting and unique race on their introduction in ''11001001'' - and then came the ''Enterprise'' episode "Regeneration" where Phlox casually mentions that part of their brains are removed when they are babies and in its place goes a processor that forcibly connects you to a hive mind whether you like it or not. The only difference between the Bynars and the Borg is that the former only assimilates their own. Perhaps the reason why we never see them again is precisely because the Federation realised how messed up this is post Wolf-359 and diplomatic relations broke down.

to:

* The character Amanda was never seen again after the episode "True Q". At the end of the episode, Q takes her to the Continuum after its discovered she has decides she can't give up her Q powers. Before she leaves though, she tells Crusher she wants to come back and visit her still, and Crusher informs her she's Q and can do anything she wants. Earlier in the episode it had been brought up that she'll likely be destroyed by Q for being part-human. Q claims that won't occur, but given the character never turned up again...
* The Bynars initially seem like nothing more than a very interesting and unique race on their introduction in ''11001001'' - and then came the ''Enterprise'' episode "Regeneration" where Phlox casually mentions that part of their brains are removed when they are babies and in its place goes a processor that forcibly connects you to a hive mind whether you like it or not. The only difference between the Bynars and the Borg is that the former only assimilates their own. Perhaps the reason why we never see them again is precisely because the Federation realised how messed up this is post Wolf-359 and diplomatic relations broke down.
down.
* In "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E16QWho}} Q Who]]", the away team finds an infant on the Borg ship, which they leave as is; they assume it's simply a Borg child. But it turns out the Borg don't reproduce sexually, they forcibly assimilate. Meaning the baby was abducted by the Borg, and the away team just left it there instead of rescuing it and removing its implants.[[note]]This was a result of {{retcon}}, as originally the Borg were a single organic species who embraced cybernetic enhancement and were only interested in the technology of other races; "assimilation" was something the writers came up with in later appearances.[[/note]]


** It's one thing to discuss document the overall nature of the civilization (at least the ending of one) such as the kind of people they were, their technology, etc. However, he likely left out his own personal experiences, his marriage and family life, and, of course, the flute he learned to play. For him, that was too intimate to share with just anyone.

to:

** It's one thing to discuss and document the overall nature of the civilization (at least the ending of one) such as the kind of people they were, their technology, etc. However, he likely left out his own personal experiences, his marriage and family life, and, of course, the flute he learned to play. For him, that was too intimate to share with just anyone.

Added DiffLines:

** It's one thing to discuss document the overall nature of the civilization (at least the ending of one) such as the kind of people they were, their technology, etc. However, he likely left out his own personal experiences, his marriage and family life, and, of course, the flute he learned to play. For him, that was too intimate to share with just anyone.

Added DiffLines:

** Diluted a bit when they only said "pleasure", it wasn't necessarily sexual. But there is more fridge horror when you realise that ''O'Brien'' was one of the ones affected and he has a ''baby''.

Added DiffLines:

*** This highlights the strange love/hate relationship between the Federation and the Klingons. When things get bad they can be warriors that make even the Klingons envious but they try really hard not to be like that. So the Klingons both admire them and are frustrated by them giving up or rejecting the traits they admire.


** Imagine being trapped in a hopeless ForeverWar / BadFuture and being the [[OnlySaneMan only person on the ship]] who can tell that this hellish war-torn reality is ''not'' the way things should be... plus knowing that a peaceful, wondrous future -- the way things ''should'' be -- is just out of reach... it's amazing that Guinan didn't go mad .

to:

** Imagine being trapped in a hopeless ForeverWar / BadFuture and being the [[OnlySaneMan only person on the ship]] who can tell that this hellish war-torn reality is ''not'' the way things should be... plus knowing that a peaceful, wondrous future -- the way things ''should'' be -- is just out of reach... it's amazing that Guinan didn't go mad .mad.
***For ''22 years'', most likely. Not only does this boost the Fridge Horror meter even further, it means that it doubles as a bit of Fridge Brilliance, too. She was so danged sure the timeline was wrong, not only because her species can do that (as postulated by Data) but because she's had decades to stew on it. The Enterprise-C coming through the rift is all she needs to put two and two together.

Added DiffLines:

** It is never said in ''Generations'' that she specifically was in their home system when the Borg attacked - only that she is a refugee. It keeps continuity intact far better if she was forced to flee a broken colony far from home instead of bearing actual witness to the Borg themselves.

Added DiffLines:

* In [[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E6TheGame "Q Who"]], Guinan is well aware of the threat of the Borg who are shown to be nigh unstoppable and virtually exterminated her people. Yet, the crew has to repeatedly press her for details, she doesn't volunteer anything and what she does provide can be classified as understatement. ''They're called the Borg. Protect yourself, Captain, or they'll destroy you.'' instead of ''They're the Borg, we need to run as fast as we can, immediately!'' Supposition: it's related to the El Aurian "listener" trait - they are very private. This would explain their ability to listen as they need to be more aware of others in order to communicate, they're more subtle than other races so they've learned how to read it. It also helps promote them as confidants, one can trust that Guinan would never share something told in secret, which encourages other to share stories with El Aurians. Can also perhaps explain Guinan's assertion that she wasn't present during the annihilation of her home system despite being shown as a refugee on the Enterprise B - she's lying to maintain her privacy.

Added DiffLines:

*** Even if Kahless wasn't particularly big and burly, he still could have been a remarkably tough and effective fighter (even allowing for the fact that his reputation was exaggerated over the centuries).


** The probe was also brought on board for "further study". Someone else could have watched/experienced it during those studies

to:

** The probe was also brought on board for "further study". Someone else could have watched/experienced it during those studies studies.
***It was stated at the end of the episode that the probe was not functioning anymore.

Added DiffLines:

* While it probably is more retcon and writer screw ups, there's a solid rationale for it outside of those facts: Before "Menage a Troi" establishes that Betazoids can't read Ferengi, Deanna managed to read a few Ferengi. However, she was also doing so when the Ferengi were on the viewscreen. What makes more sense, that her empathic abilities, which are diluted as it is because of her status as a half-Betazoid, half-human, can extend across dozens of kilometers to another vessel, or that the trained psychologist watched these Ferengi on the screen, read their body language, listened closely as they spoke, and determined their emotional state?

Showing 15 edit(s) of 220

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback