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** It's also more realstic, since they're meant to be about the same age as Peter's parents would be (being that his Uncle Ben was his father's brother), but they often look more like grandparents. It's actually more sensible to have an aunt / uncle be aged around 50 / 60 than the usual silver-haired versions we get
* How come the Daily Bugle gets away with printing so much hatred towards Spider-Man? Surely after a while someone would attempt to sue them for defamation or outright libel, but the answer is very simple: there's no evidence to the contrary. People like Flash Thompson can insist all they want that Spider-Man is a hero, that doesn't mean that they can prove it. All the public sees of Spider-Man is a guy in a mask who patrols the city and assaults civillians, claiming they were committing crimes. Even if the civillians in question wind up being arrested, as Jameson brings up, how do we know Spider-Man isn't in league with the thugs and double-crossing them at the last minute? In short, the Daily Bugle is considered the most trusted opinion on Spider-Man since it represents how the public feels on him.

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*** But they also have a lot of overtones of black. Carnage is red with a lot of black mixed in, and Venom is dark blue at best, but almost always black. Even if they are meant to be Spider-Man's own colours, they're more grimy, ugly, evil versions of them (fitting since that's what both Venom and Carnage technically are: evil versions of Spider-Man)

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[[AC:Fridge Logic]]
* Goblins are known in fiction as a ProudMerchantRace and good with technology. Norman is a rich businessman and GadgeteerGenius super villain.
* Norman is the {{Foil}}/EvilCounterpart of Peter in more ways than one. Both are hardworking; (sometimes) aloof geniuses, yes, but it's amazing how they parallel each other as well in many other ways: Peter is working class, and one of the themes of Spider-Man is him struggling his superhero life with normal everyday struggles (work, college, paying bills). While Norman came from a bankrupt family, he eventually rose to power to become an influential billionaire. He almost never struggles in the same manner as Peter does. Peter is responsible, in the way that when a situation gets complicated, he's the first one to make the necessary sacrifices to help his loved ones (while not having much of his own to give away). Norman is a man who has everything; yet when things go crumbling down, instead of admitting his involvement in the problem, he sticks his fingers in his ears and puts on a Halloween costume like a little kid would, completely ignoring the issue. Peter may have really bad luck; but his loved ones genuinely care for him and support him, even when things get rough. Norman instead is only surrounded by asskissers, people who use him for their own benefits, and Harry; who is toxically dependent on him. In short, Norman's ultimate motive is that he wants limitless power without any responsibilities to others whatsoever, and his archfoe is the hero whose motto is literally "with great power comes great responsibility." It makes perfect sense why he is Peter's Arch-Enemy above all the other rogues, he's practically a dark shadow of him.
** It's even visible in their choice of transportation devices, both of which reflect their signature personal inventions: Norman's bat-glider reflects his desire to soar above everything, casting his shadow over it; Peter's webbing is all about how he stays tethered and grounded.
* Why does Norman [[spoiler:choose the Goblin identity again despite seeing that SanityHasAdvantages after he is "cured?"]] Because his mental problems weren't wholly caused by the Serum, so [[spoiler:simply having it purged from his system doesn't actually make him sane, despite Norman's perception of it.]]
* In one of Steve Ditko's last stories in ''Amazing Spider-Man'', there's a very subtle hint that Norman is the Goblin. Someone fires a rifle at Osborn's former partner, Mendel Stromm, causing a fatal heart attack in Stromm. Spider-Man leaps up to the wind from which the shot was fired, and sees no one. But Ditko's art also shows that it's a window high up on a blank exterior wall, with no way of getting to it. Norman is later shown concealing the rifle. The hint is that Norman would need some method of personal *flight* to get to the window and make the shot. And since the only two Spider-Man villains at the time who could fly were the Vulture and the Goblin, and the Vulture is a bald old man....



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** Unless you're in the Avengers of course. Then they probably will never like you.


*** Envy (The Lizard: Peter complains a lot about how balancing a social life and a career along with a superhero's life is, sometimes wanting to flat out retire, doing so for a while, until he realizes that people still need Spider-Man. Curt Connors wants to be normal so bad, he'd risked becoming a human-lizard monster who either tries to take over the world with reptiles or freaking ''eats people''.

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*** Envy (The Lizard: Lizard): Peter complains a lot about how balancing a social life and a career along with a superhero's life is, sometimes wanting to flat out retire, doing so for a while, until he realizes that people still need Spider-Man. Curt Connors wants to be normal so bad, he'd risked becoming a human-lizard monster who either tries to take over the world with reptiles or freaking ''eats people''.


* Spider-Man's most notable enemies are demonically possessed. Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, The Lizard, and Venom all have some element of duality to them: Norman Osborn and The Green Goblin are distinct personalities, Curt Connors and The Lizard are similarly two separate entities, Venom is composed of Eddie Brock and The Symbiote, as is Carnage only with Cletus Cassidy and Doctor Octopus is (at least in the second film) being controlled by his A.I. robotic arms. This may not seem overly significant at first, but each of them can also represent one of the seven deadly sins: Greed (Green Goblin), Pride (Doc Ock), Envy (The Lizard, Wrath (Venom), Lust (Carnage) and Gluttony (Kingpin). Each character becomes a villain (and thus gains their dualistic nature) by way of their sin: Green Goblin used himself as a test subject for a process that he hoped to make money off of, Doctor Octopus was out to prove what a genius he was, Curt Connors wanted to re-grow his arm to be "normal", it was Eddie Brock's irrational hatred of Spider-Man that attracts, and feeds, the symbiote, Carnage was formed because of Cletus Cassidy's unquenchable thirst for destruction and bloodshed and, while not dualistic, the Kingpin has been taken over by his ever-consuming desire to expand and diversify his already exceedingly large criminal empire. If you look at the dual identity of each villain as the patron demon of their particular sin, each character "called" the demon to them through their sins, and became possessed. As yet, I can't think of any Spider-Man villains that represent the other Deadly Sin, maybe because Sloth would probably make a really stupid villain.

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* Spider-Man's most notable enemies are demonically possessed. Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, The Lizard, and Venom all have some element of duality to them: Norman Osborn and The Green Goblin are distinct personalities, Curt Connors and The Lizard are similarly two separate entities, Venom is composed of Eddie Brock and The Symbiote, as is Carnage only with Cletus Cassidy and Doctor Octopus is (at least in the second film) being controlled by his A.I. robotic arms. This may not seem overly significant at first, but each of them can also represent one of the seven deadly sins: Greed (Green Goblin), Pride (Doc Ock), Envy (The Lizard, Lizard), Wrath (Venom), Lust (Carnage) and Gluttony (Kingpin). Each character becomes a villain (and thus gains their dualistic nature) by way of their sin: Green Goblin used himself as a test subject for a process that he hoped to make money off of, Doctor Octopus was out to prove what a genius he was, Curt Connors wanted to re-grow his arm to be "normal", it was Eddie Brock's irrational hatred of Spider-Man that attracts, and feeds, the symbiote, Carnage was formed because of Cletus Cassidy's unquenchable thirst for destruction and bloodshed and, while not dualistic, the Kingpin has been taken over by his ever-consuming desire to expand and diversify his already exceedingly large criminal empire. If you look at the dual identity of each villain as the patron demon of their particular sin, each character "called" the demon to them through their sins, and became possessed. As yet, I can't think of any Spider-Man villains that represent the other Deadly Sin, maybe because Sloth would probably make a really stupid villain.


** Applying this theory to the rouges gallery makes me realize that Spidey, at one point or another, has shown to have ALL of these sins and his main enemies are basically what he could end up as if he didn't have any self-control or wasn't such a good guy:

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** Applying this theory to the rouges gallery makes me realize that Spidey, at one point or another, has shown to have ALL of these sins and his main enemies are basically represent what he could end up as if he didn't have any self-control or wasn't such a good guy:


* Spider-Man's most notable enemies are demonically possessed. Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, The Lizard, and Venom all have some element of duality to them: Norman Osborn and The Green Goblin are distinct personalities, Curt Connors and The Lizard are similarly two separate entities, Venom is composed of Eddie Brock and The Symbiote, as is Carnage only with Cletus Cassidy and Doctor Octopus is (at least in the second film) being controlled by his A.I. robotic arms. This may not seem overly significant at first, but each of them can also represent one of the seven deadly sins: Greed (Green Goblin), Pride (Doc Ock), Envy (The Lizard), Wrath (Venom), Lust (Carnage) and Gluttony (Kingpin). Each character becomes a villain (and thus gains their dualistic nature) by way of their sin: Green Goblin used himself as a test subject for a process that he hoped to make money off of, Doctor Octopus was out to prove what a genius he was, Curt Connors wanted to re-grow his arm to be "normal", it was Eddie Brock's irrational hatred of Spider-Man that attracts, and feeds, the symbiote, Carnage was formed because of Cletus Cassidy's unquenchable thirst for destruction and bloodshed and, while not dualistic, the Kingpin has been taken over by his ever-consuming desire to expand and diversify his already exceedingly large criminal empire. If you look at the dual identity of each villain as the patron demon of their particular sin, each character "called" the demon to them through their sins, and became possessed. As yet, I can't think of any Spider-Man villains that represent the other Deadly Sin, maybe because Sloth would probably make a really stupid villain.

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* Spider-Man's most notable enemies are demonically possessed. Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, The Lizard, and Venom all have some element of duality to them: Norman Osborn and The Green Goblin are distinct personalities, Curt Connors and The Lizard are similarly two separate entities, Venom is composed of Eddie Brock and The Symbiote, as is Carnage only with Cletus Cassidy and Doctor Octopus is (at least in the second film) being controlled by his A.I. robotic arms. This may not seem overly significant at first, but each of them can also represent one of the seven deadly sins: Greed (Green Goblin), Pride (Doc Ock), Envy (The Lizard), Lizard, Wrath (Venom), Lust (Carnage) and Gluttony (Kingpin). Each character becomes a villain (and thus gains their dualistic nature) by way of their sin: Green Goblin used himself as a test subject for a process that he hoped to make money off of, Doctor Octopus was out to prove what a genius he was, Curt Connors wanted to re-grow his arm to be "normal", it was Eddie Brock's irrational hatred of Spider-Man that attracts, and feeds, the symbiote, Carnage was formed because of Cletus Cassidy's unquenchable thirst for destruction and bloodshed and, while not dualistic, the Kingpin has been taken over by his ever-consuming desire to expand and diversify his already exceedingly large criminal empire. If you look at the dual identity of each villain as the patron demon of their particular sin, each character "called" the demon to them through their sins, and became possessed. As yet, I can't think of any Spider-Man villains that represent the other Deadly Sin, maybe because Sloth would probably make a really stupid villain.


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** Applying this theory to the rouges gallery makes me realize that Spidey, at one point or another, has shown to have ALL of these sins and his main enemies are basically what he could end up as if he didn't have any self-control or wasn't such a good guy:
*** Greed (Green Goblin): Peter's always been on the edge of poverty, becoming Spider-Man in the first place to make cash for himself as well as for his aunt and uncle, but he never goes into full greed mode due to his personal responsibilities. Norman, on the other hand, partly due to how his dad ended up ruining himself and taking his rage out on him, obsessively tries to get more and more power, no matter who he ends up hurting, including his own family.
*** Pride (Doc Ock): Peter has pride in his abilities, but balances it out with his humbleness or whenever he gets knocked down a peg in his life; Otto Octavius is so full of himself, he obsessively devotes himself to ruling the world schemes or destroying Spider-Man, at one point taking over Peter's body thinking he could be a "superior" Spider-Man.
*** Envy (The Lizard: Peter complains a lot about how balancing a social life and a career along with a superhero's life is, sometimes wanting to flat out retire, doing so for a while, until he realizes that people still need Spider-Man. Curt Connors wants to be normal so bad, he'd risked becoming a human-lizard monster who either tries to take over the world with reptiles or freaking ''eats people''.
*** Wrath (Venom): He already beats bad guys up, but God help you when you piss off Spider-man enough that ''murder'' becomes an option. Thankfully, he (for the most part) has never gone too far with the murder thing, at least not to Punisher-levels. Venom, on the other hand, has brutally killed, even eaten, people, including some innocents in his early days. He still kills and eats baddies while operating as an antihero, but usually tries to avoid innocent people.


* Spider-man's strength. It's always been said that Spider-Man has the proportional strength of a spider. But, honestly, a spider's strength isn't nearly the same as Peter. But then I realized, he doesn't have the proportional strength of a spider. He has the proportional strength of a '''radioactive/genetically altered''' spider. That extra change in the spider's DNA might very well have increased its strength by 2, 10, even 50 fold. No wonder he's so strong!

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* Spider-man's Spider-Man's strength. It's always been said that Spider-Man has the proportional strength of a spider. But, honestly, a spider's strength isn't nearly the same as Peter. But then I realized, he doesn't have the proportional strength of a spider. He has the proportional strength of a '''radioactive/genetically altered''' spider. That extra change in the spider's DNA might very well have increased its strength by 2, 10, even 50 fold. No wonder he's so strong!

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** Potentially, ''Spider-Man'' himself represents Sloth. While his powers were an accident he had no control over, he didn't truly become Spider-Man until he ''didn't act'', letting a robber get away which lead to the death of Uncle Ben. He got his powers without doing anything, he lost his uncle because he didn't do anything... and when he decided to start acting, only then did he become a hero.


* Speaking of ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', have you noticed the logo for Creator/JoeQuesada's column, [[http://www.hypergeek.ca/wp-content/gallery/press5/cup-o-joe.jpg "Cup O' Joe"?]] Like, the fact none other than Spidey is behind Quesada? [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything You know what that really means?]] The implied meaning of the logo is about Quesada either threatening, teasing, daring, trolling, provoking or irritating the audience (and other writers alike) with the message, ''"if you want to retcon SpiderMan, you have to get past me"''.

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* Speaking of ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', have you noticed the logo for Creator/JoeQuesada's column, [[http://www.hypergeek.ca/wp-content/gallery/press5/cup-o-joe.jpg "Cup O' Joe"?]] Like, the fact none other than Spidey is behind Quesada? [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything You know what that really means?]] The implied meaning of the logo is about Quesada either threatening, teasing, daring, trolling, provoking or irritating the audience (and other writers alike) with the message, ''"if you want to retcon SpiderMan, ComicBook/SpiderMan, you have to get past me"''.


** This can also get turned on its head when you look at [[BlueOniRedOni Venom and Carnage.]] Carnage is red, and Venom is, DependingOnTheArtist, blue. Since they're both {{Evil Counterpart}}s to Spidey ([[EvilVersusEvil and each other]]), it's almost convenient that they're colored in a way that can turn Spidey's bright coloring and flip it ''right'' back to the frightening level he was actively trying to avoid. - [=ImSpidey2=]

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** This can also get turned on its head when you look at [[BlueOniRedOni Venom and Carnage.]] Carnage is red, and Venom is, DependingOnTheArtist, blue. Since they're both {{Evil Counterpart}}s to Spidey ([[EvilVersusEvil and each other]]), it's almost convenient that they're colored in a way that can turn Spidey's bright coloring and flip it ''right'' back to the frightening level he was actively trying to avoid. - [=ImSpidey2=]

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