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* The biggest names seem to replicate the style of an existing famous rapper. With his incendiary, rapid-fire style, Hamilton resembles B. Real from Music/CypressHill. With his blunt, hard-hitting style, Washington represents Chuck D from Music/PublicEnemy. And with his showy, flamboyant flow, Jefferson represents Andre 3000 from Music/OutKast.

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* The biggest names seem to replicate the style of an existing famous rapper. With his incendiary, rapid-fire style, Hamilton resembles B. Real from Music/CypressHill.Music/CypressHill and Creator/Eminem. With his blunt, hard-hitting style, Washington represents Chuck D from Music/PublicEnemy. And with his showy, flamboyant flow, Jefferson represents Andre 3000 from Music/OutKast.


* There's irony in the same actor playing both Philip Schuyler, who tells Hamilton to "Be true" when allowing him to marry Eliza) in Act I and James Reynolds, who blackmails Hamilton into paying him to keep the affair between Hamilton and Reynolds' wife Maria quiet in Act II.

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* There's irony in the same actor playing both Philip Schuyler, who tells Hamilton to "Be true" when allowing him to marry Eliza) Eliza in Act I and James Reynolds, who blackmails Hamilton into paying him to keep the affair between Hamilton and Reynolds' wife Maria quiet in Act II.



* In "Right Hand Man", Washington tells Hamilton "Dying is easy, young man. Living is harder." Say No To This and The Room Where It Happens are the numbers in which Hamilton's life starts going downhill. In the latter, Hamilton and Burr have this exchange:

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* In "Right Hand Man", Washington tells Hamilton "Dying is easy, young man. Living is harder." Say "Say No To This This" and The "The Room Where It Happens Happens" are the numbers in which Hamilton's life starts going downhill. In the latter, Hamilton and Burr have this exchange:



* Why is it Angelica singing with Alexander for most of It's Quiet Uptown instead of Eliza, when it's about what Eliza and Alexander went through? Well remember one of Angelica's returning lines: "I know my sister like I know my own mind." She knows exactly what her sister feels but she is able to articulate it whereas Eliza is still reeling with shock.

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* Why is it Angelica singing with Alexander for most of It's "It's Quiet Uptown Uptown" instead of Eliza, when it's about what Eliza and Alexander went through? Well remember one of Angelica's returning lines: "I know my sister like I know my own mind." She knows exactly what her sister feels but she is able to articulate it whereas Eliza is still reeling with shock.

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* There's irony in the same actor playing both Philip Schuyler, who tells Hamilton to "Be true" when allowing him to marry Eliza) in Act I and James Reynolds, who blackmails Hamilton into paying him to keep the affair between Hamilton and Reynolds' wife Maria quiet in Act II.


* In the second cabinet battle, Hamilton says "Lafayette's a smart man, he'll be fine". To make a long story short, by the end of the French Revolution, the real Marquis de Lafayette was anything ''but'' fine; after everything he suffered, the only thing that could really be said for him is that he and ''most'' of his children survived. Hamilton's faith in his friend directly led to Lafayette's suffering in the Revolution.

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* In the second cabinet battle, Hamilton says "Lafayette's a smart man, he'll be fine". To make a long story short, by the end of the French Revolution, the real Marquis de Lafayette was anything ''but'' fine; after everything he suffered, the only thing that could really be said for him is that he and ''most'' of his children survived. Hamilton's faith in his friend directly led to Lafayette's suffering in the Revolution.[[note]]Lafayette would spend at least five years in prison while his family were either hiding or being killed.[[/note]]



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* When Burr introduces the Schuyler sisters at the beginning of their titular song, he actually names them off in the order they died in: "his daughters, Peggy (1801), Angelica (1814), Eliza (1854)".



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** And when Hamilton explains and can document everything, Jefferson responds, "My God!" Jefferson realizes that not only was Hamilton being truthful, he himself would be in political trouble if any of his supposed affairs came to light at the time.


* In 'Hurricane', Hamilton notes that while in the eye of the hurricane, it's quiet for just a moment. Then the chaos resumes. Well, in the song immediately afterward, what happens? He's in the center (the eye) while chaos flies all around him (ala, a hurricane.) In other words, he was in a hurricane of his own making and that precise moment he wrote the pamphlet, he was in the eye.

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* In 'Hurricane', Hamilton notes that while in the eye of the hurricane, it's quiet for just a moment. Then the chaos resumes. Well, in the song immediately afterward, what happens? He's in the center (the eye) while chaos flies all around him (ala, a hurricane.) In other words, he was in a hurricane of his own making and that precise moment he wrote the pamphlet, he was in the eye.eye.
* In the second cabinet battle, Hamilton says "Lafayette's a smart man, he'll be fine". To make a long story short, by the end of the French Revolution, the real Marquis de Lafayette was anything ''but'' fine; after everything he suffered, the only thing that could really be said for him is that he and ''most'' of his children survived. Hamilton's faith in his friend directly led to Lafayette's suffering in the Revolution.


* The actor playing Lafayette/Jefferson goes back to France (off-stage) toward the end of Act I, and comes back from France as Jefferson.

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* ** The actor playing Lafayette/Jefferson goes back to France (off-stage) toward the end of Act I, (off-stage), and comes back from France as Jefferson.


** Jefferson is fighting Hamilton for the US to give aid to the French: including Lafayette. Hamilton promises Lafayette that if his people fight for freedom, the US will be there to help. Jefferson is trying to hold Hamilton to the promise he made to him- er, Lafayette.

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* The actor playing Lafayette/Jefferson goes back to France (off-stage) toward the end of Act I, and comes back from France as Jefferson.
** Jefferson is fighting Hamilton for the US to give aid to the French: including Lafayette. Hamilton promises Lafayette that if his people fight for freedom, the US will be there to help. Jefferson is trying to hold Hamilton to the promise he made to him- er, Lafayette.



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* While understandable that Hamilton's idea to publish the Reynold Pamphlet and nearly destroy both his career ''and'' marriage was a pretty stupid one, however, it's possible something else was at play. Hamilton, in the play at least, is established to be a man bound to honor and decency and ''Say No To This'' made it very clear he was racked by guilt by what he'd done, but could find no way out. The Reynold Pamphlet, in a way, was Hamilton's guilty conscience forcing him to come clean with his crime. Yes, he'd face severe backlash, but at least he could look himself in the mirror and not be ashamed.



** By the end of the play, however, Eliza is basically ‘’alone’’. She is forced to raise very small children, one of whom is a young adult who had suffered a severe mental breakdown following Phillip’s death and essentially regressed to a small child. How she herself didn’t go mad with grief is a miracle.

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** By the end of the play, however, Eliza is basically ‘’alone’’.'''alone'''. She is forced to raise very small children, one of whom is a young adult who had suffered a severe mental breakdown following Phillip’s death and essentially regressed to a small child. How she herself didn’t go mad with grief is a miracle.miracle.
* In 'Hurricane', Hamilton notes that while in the eye of the hurricane, it's quiet for just a moment. Then the chaos resumes. Well, in the song immediately afterward, what happens? He's in the center (the eye) while chaos flies all around him (ala, a hurricane.) In other words, he was in a hurricane of his own making and that precise moment he wrote the pamphlet, he was in the eye.



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* Miranda himself has described ''Hamilton'' as a love letter to the rap genre. It thus makes sense that [[spoiler:Hamilton's dying monologue]] isn't technically rap at all, but is instead a speaking style often associated with rap: slam poetry.


** Thomas Jefferson's larger than life nature in the musical at first conflicts with his RL quiet almost shy personality ... until you consider that rapping= literary intellect and suddenly, Hamilton's Jefferson is a representation of Jefferson's writing, which was larger than life.

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** * Thomas Jefferson's larger than life nature in the musical at first conflicts with his RL quiet almost shy personality ... until you consider that rapping= literary intellect and suddenly, Hamilton's Jefferson is a representation of Jefferson's writing, which was larger than life.


** Thomas Jefferson's larger than life nature in the musical at first conflicts with his RL quiet almost shy personality ... until you consider that rapping= literary intellect and suddenly, Hamilton's Jefferson is a representation of Jefferson's writing, which was larger than life.



* At the beginning of the musical, everyone is dressed up in parchment-colored outfits ''except'' for Burr, who is dressed in a dark colored outfit. This not only illustrates his status as the villain of the musical, but also the narrator. Burr represents the words on the parchment of Hamilton's story.

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* At the beginning of the musical, everyone is dressed up in parchment-colored parchment-coloured outfits ''except'' for Burr, who is dressed in a dark colored coloured outfit. This not only illustrates his status as the villain of the musical, musical but also the narrator. Burr represents the words on the parchment of Hamilton's story.



* There's a [[TheScottishTrope famous superstition]] that a certain [[Theatre/{{Macbeth}} Scottish tragedy]] by William Shakespeare is cursed, and one should not speak the name of the play in a theater. In the song "Take a Break", there are four references to it - either spoken by or involving Alexander Hamilton, whose life starts to go downhill as soon as the song ends.

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* There's a [[TheScottishTrope famous superstition]] that a certain [[Theatre/{{Macbeth}} Scottish tragedy]] by William Shakespeare is cursed, and one should not speak the name of the play in a theater.theatre. In the song "Take a Break", there are four references to it - either spoken by or involving Alexander Hamilton, whose life starts to go downhill as soon as the song ends.



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* One of the more obvious uses of {{Foreshadowing}} through {{Leitmotif}} is at the beginning of "Take a Break," in which Phillip counting to ten [[spoiler: is the same melody used in "Ten Duel Commandments," symbolizing how Phillip would eventually be killed in a duel. When that duel finally happens in "Blow Us All Away," Phillip gets shot on "seven." Then in "Stay Alive Reprise," he dies on "trois" (three). Add them together, and you get ten!]]

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** Not only that, but just before the final "Click, boom!", the piano can be heard playing the "Alexander Hamilton" jingle (it's a lot easier to hear on instrumental tracks). Even the ''piano in the background'' is foreshadowing the duel the musical ends on.

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