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*** According to the lyrics of Gaston's villain song, Gaston considers the perfect man is big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair. Now who else in the film fits that description? That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him.

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*** According to the lyrics of Gaston's villain song, Gaston considers views the perfect man is as big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair. Now who else in the film fits that description? description to a much greater extent than Gaston? That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him.



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* Considering the fact that the Beast becomes more... well, bestial the longer he stays as a beast, how much of his refusal to fight back against Gaston is him wanting to [[DyingAsYourself die in full possession of his mental faculties]]?


* Why does the Beast look so concerned when Belle sees him dying in the mirror? Given the time of period that has passed (the movie starts in autumn and ends at the beginning of spring) and how close they've become, chances are very good that the Beast and Belle did talk about her father at least once and the Beast would know how close the two of them are. It also stands to reason that the Beast has grown to care for Maurice...and the Beast is aware that it's his fault that Maurice is in the situation he's in.

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* Why does the Beast look so concerned when Belle sees him Maurice dying in the mirror? Given the amount of time of period that has passed (the movie starts in autumn and ends at the beginning of spring) and how close they've become, chances are very good that the Beast and Belle did talk about her father at least once and the Beast would know how close the two of them are. It also stands to reason that the Beast has grown to care for Maurice...and the Beast is aware that it's his fault that Maurice is in the situation he's in.

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*** When the servants are rushing downstairs, the line is "Hearts ablaze, banners high, we go marching into battle, unafraid although the danger just increased." It seems unlikely that the servants would say ''that''.



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*** I wouldn't really compare her asking to spend the night in a castle in Europe during the 18th century to you letting a random woman in your apartment. While I'm not sure if France had this same cultural, a lot of cultures traditionally maintained a strong belief in hospitality during those days. While a castle might not just let any beggar waltz on in willy nilly, the idea of sheltering a stranger from a snowstorm wasn't outlandish back then, that's why there's so many fairy tales and folk tales that have that exact moral about taking in a stranger.



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* In the opening song, a woman who "needs six eggs" is told that they are "too expensive". Later in the movie, Gaston says that he eats five dozen eggs every morning. Three guesses as to why eggs are so expensive in this town...


*** If you pay attention to the very lyrics of Gaston's song, Gaston considers the best values in a man to be: ''being big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair,'' Now who else in the film fits that very description? [[spoiler:That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him!]]

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*** If you pay attention According to the very lyrics of Gaston's villain song, Gaston considers the best values in a perfect man to be: ''being is big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair,'' hair. Now who else in the film fits that very description? [[spoiler:That's That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Gaston's own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him!]]him.


*** According to WordOfGod, none of these are true. An audio commentary from 1991 stated that not every moving or talking object in the castle has a one to one human equivalent, it's just more fun to have musical numbers with dancing flatware and furniture in a Disney movie about an enchanted castle (or, to quote Lindsay Ellis: [[AWizardDidIt It's an enchanted castle. Ergo, the stuff in it is also enchanted]]). And this makes sense, because if literally ''every single thing in the entire castle'' used to be a human, then there'd be no furniture, flatware, silverware, glasses, cleaning implements etc. left in the castle. The ''real'' FridgeHorror here is what happens to ''these'' living objects once the curse is lifted? The curse gave them life, but that will inevitably leave them when it's lifted/reversed. [[CessationOfExistence At least the former employees got to live on as humans...]]

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*** According to WordOfGod, none of these are the second one is true. An audio commentary from 1991 stated that not every moving or talking object in the castle has a one to one human equivalent, it's just more fun to have musical numbers with dancing flatware and furniture in a Disney movie about an enchanted castle (or, to quote Lindsay Ellis: [[AWizardDidIt It's an enchanted castle. Ergo, the stuff in it is also enchanted]]). And this makes sense, because if literally ''every single thing in the entire castle'' used to be a human, then there'd be no furniture, flatware, silverware, glasses, cleaning implements etc. left in the castle. The ''real'' FridgeHorror here is what happens to ''these'' living objects once the curse is lifted? The curse gave them life, but that will inevitably leave them when it's lifted/reversed. [[CessationOfExistence At least the former employees got to live on as humans...]]

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*** According to WordOfGod, none of these are true. An audio commentary from 1991 stated that not every moving or talking object in the castle has a one to one human equivalent, it's just more fun to have musical numbers with dancing flatware and furniture in a Disney movie about an enchanted castle (or, to quote Lindsay Ellis: [[AWizardDidIt It's an enchanted castle. Ergo, the stuff in it is also enchanted]]). And this makes sense, because if literally ''every single thing in the entire castle'' used to be a human, then there'd be no furniture, flatware, silverware, glasses, cleaning implements etc. left in the castle. The ''real'' FridgeHorror here is what happens to ''these'' living objects once the curse is lifted? The curse gave them life, but that will inevitably leave them when it's lifted/reversed. [[CessationOfExistence At least the former employees got to live on as humans...]]


*** If you pay attention to the very lyrics of Gaston's song, Gaston considers the best values in a man to be: ''being big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair,'' [[CaptainObvious Now who else in the film fits that very description?]] [[spoiler:That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him!]]

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*** If you pay attention to the very lyrics of Gaston's song, Gaston considers the best values in a man to be: ''being big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair,'' [[CaptainObvious Now who else in the film fits that very description?]] description? [[spoiler:That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him!]]


* Belle referring to Gaston as "positively primeval" is, on the surface, a StealthInsult. But it also serves as {{foreshadowing}} for his becoming more animalistic mich later on in the film.
* Considering the personalities of the three main servants of the castle, the objects they have been transformed into ''make a lot of sense''. Cogsworth is a stickler for rules and schedules, so he would become something as precise and [[ButtMonkey in need of]] [[StealthPun winding up]] as a clock. Lumiere is passionate about romance (in regards to both [[ReallyGetsAround himself]] and [[ShipperOnDeck between Belle and the Beast]]), and fire is often associated with passion, with candles especially as the centrepiece of romantic dinners. Lastly, Mrs. Potts is [[TeamMom motherly to the Beast, Belle and the other servants]], always at hand to calm and reassure those in despair or in rage. Especially in her actresses' native Britain, [[SpotOfTea what is more associated with helping to calm and relax than almost any other meal?]]

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* Belle referring to Gaston as "positively primeval" is, on the surface, a StealthInsult. But it also serves as {{foreshadowing}} for his becoming more animalistic mich much later on in the film.
* Considering the personalities of the three main servants of the castle, the objects they have been transformed into ''make a lot of sense''. Cogsworth is a stickler for rules and schedules, so he would become something as precise and [[ButtMonkey in need of]] [[StealthPun winding up]] as a clock. Lumiere is passionate about romance (in regards to both [[ReallyGetsAround himself]] and [[ShipperOnDeck between Belle and the Beast]]), and fire is often associated with passion, with candles especially as the centrepiece centerpiece of romantic dinners. Lastly, Mrs. Potts is [[TeamMom motherly to the Beast, Belle and the other servants]], always at hand to calm and reassure those in despair or in rage. Especially in her actresses' native Britain, [[SpotOfTea what is more associated with helping to calm and relax than almost any other meal?]]




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* Some viewers might dismiss the presence of the enchanted rose in the Prologue as FridgeLogic: how could the Prince not notice the strangeness of being offered a rose in the dead of winter? It's probably for that reason that the 2017 version replaces the winter setting of the scene with a spring/summer rainstorm. But what if the Prince's lack of observation was part of the point? He was so disgusted by the old woman's ugliness and rags that he barely even noticed the obvious sign of magic in her hand! That showed just how much of an ignorant, classist RoyalBrat he was and probably confirmed to the Enchantress that he deserved to become a beast!


[[AC:FridgeLogic]]
* If Lumiere said that "ten years we've been rusting" and that the Beast must love someone before his 21st birthday, it would mean that the prince was around 11 when he was cursed. But in the flashback scene in ''The Enchanted Christmas'', the prince looks the same as he did when he changed back. What's up?
** Did we watch the same film? I thought he looked a bit younger in the flashback, though probably older than 11.
** Here's a theory: it has to do with the way time is told in the castle. Aside from the fact that the castle as a whole is apparently wiped from the reality or at least the minds of the villagers, and that seasons don't seem to sync up between the worlds (snow at Belle's house while the castle shows springtime conditions), the windows are totally covered when Maurice appears. Sunlight does not venture in and there are no calendars. The servants in the castle have no means to tell the passing of the days, or even the passage of minutes--except, of course, for Cogsworth, who hardly ever moves the hands of his face and is often seen being overwound or losing gears. By all accounts, it appears that Cogsworth is attempting to judge the passage of time by his own 'heart'beats, and that is subject to any number of variations in tempo and his own attention. If the castle is always as quiet and boring as it is when Maurice enters, scarce wonder that, if even if the times around the castle and in the town are synced up, the servants think that a much more significant amount of time has passed than they realize.
** I think that once the curse hit, they were ageless. The appliances/servants obviously can't age anymore, and since their fate is linked with that of their master's it would make sense that he didn't age either. It also can mean that the Enchantress was at least a little kind and didn't take physical years away from them.
** Or even easier, Lumiere was speaking in metaphors, and the curse hasn't lasted a decade but a couple years.
* Given that a significant amount of the castle's furnishings are enchanted servants, do they have to replace all the items that get turned back into living beings?
** They were turned into what they were using or love; they probably just merged with the already-standing appliance and when the curse was broken everything turned back to normal and the tools were restored. Think about how the outside of the castle also changed to show everything was truly back to the way it was before.
* Does the Beast really deserve his punishment? Sure, let's be clear -- as we see from the sequel, he ''is'' an absolute douchebag, but he's a teen and it's either douchebaggery or angst. But the first thing parents do -- hell, even the servants would do it if they raised him -- is to tell him "don't let people in, they could try and kill you or poison you or have the plague and infect and kill us all!" so in sending her away, the Beast is ''not'' being a douchebag; he's ''protecting everyone else in the castle from plague, poison or a possible killer'' and the Enchantress curses him because he turned her away (not knowing she was an enchantress) and because she could. And, ironically, the servants ''were'' right; she ''did'' poison them -- with her curse, which led to ''him'' dying and, eventually, ''them'' dying as inanimate objects forever.
** That wasn't his motivation, and she looked like a harmless old woman who would surely have died of exposure if turned away.
** Not to mention, before reliable transportation, hospitality was an incredibly important thing, especially in more rural and remote areas, like the heavily forested castle. In these days, it would be absolutely unthinkable to turn away a guest.
*** This isn't the Middle Ages, there's no damn way into the castle. Also why didn't she ask one of the guards to let her stay in the stable or something.
** If I were Prince Adam I'd be a little more concerned about the fact that some old woman has ''mysteriously'' gotten past the palace guards, ''mysteriously'' managed to acquire a rose (Those things were '''expensive''' during those days), meaning that she possibly stole one and most importantly, I'd be wondering wow did she get a rose in winter! In ''Winter''! Everyone who has a passing knowledge on botany knows that roses do not bloom in winter, they go dormant and lose their flowers and leaves in order to prepare for the coming springtime. Basically it's highly possible that he ''knew'' that she was an Enchantress and thats why he didn't let her in, in fact in the 'Enchanted Christmas' flashback he isn't all that surprised to learn that she was an Enchantress. Honestly, though, if a strange old woman came to YOUR home or apartment and asked to stay the night, would you EVER let her in, regardless of her appearance or the type of flower she offered? That'd be like me going up to the White House and saying, "Please give me shelter from the cold! In exchange, I humbly offer you this single 'Mets 2014 Season Schedule' refrigerator magnet. NO?? THERE IS NO LOVE IN YOUR HEART AND YOU MUST LEARN A LESSON!"
* Where did the food in the Beast's castle come fromů?
** According to "Belle's Magical World" there's regular deliveries to the castle.
* Did the villagers really forget all about the local prince in those ten short years?
** The live-action adaptation explains this with forgetting being part of the curse.


*** If you pay attention to the very lyrics of Gaston's song, Gaston considers the best values in a man to be: ''being big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair,'' [[CaptainObvious Now who else in the film fits that very description?]] [[spoiler:That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's [[HoistByHisOwnPetard own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him!]]

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*** If you pay attention to the very lyrics of Gaston's song, Gaston considers the best values in a man to be: ''being big, brawny, a strong fighter and covered in hair,'' [[CaptainObvious Now who else in the film fits that very description?]] [[spoiler:That's right, [[{{Irony}} even by Gaston's Gaston's]] [[HoistByHisOwnPetard own personal standards]], the Beast is a better man than him!]]


If you are looking to the likeness of the prince in his torn portrait, I do see cause for confusion because [[OlderThanHeLOoks he looks to be nearly the same age in the portrait]] as he does when he becomes human again ([[YoungerThanHeLooks but maybe also slightly younger]]. Let's say . . . um . . . 17). This could possibly be a simple mistake on the portrait artist's part! There are many portraits in which the sitter is portrayed noticeably older (sometimes younger) than they actually are when the portrait is painted. This may be because the prince wished for it (which would give him even more reason for ripping it; he thought he would never be able to live up to the expectations he created for himself when he ordered the portraitist to depict him in such a handsome, noble, striking way) or simply because the portraitist was not perfect in his craft and had a hard time depicting age.

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If you are looking to the likeness of the prince in his torn portrait, I do see cause for confusion because [[OlderThanHeLOoks [[OlderThanHeLooks he looks to be nearly the same age in the portrait]] as he does when he becomes human again ([[YoungerThanHeLooks but maybe also slightly younger]]. Let's say . . . um . . . 17). This could possibly be a simple mistake on the portrait artist's part! There are many portraits in which the sitter is portrayed noticeably older (sometimes younger) than they actually are when the portrait is painted. This may be because the prince wished for it (which would give him even more reason for ripping it; he thought he would never be able to live up to the expectations he created for himself when he ordered the portraitist to depict him in such a handsome, noble, striking way) or simply because the portraitist was not perfect in his craft and had a hard time depicting age.


** If you are looking at the stained glass in order to discern the prince's true age, you are looking in the wrong place. Depictions of people in stained glass are typically more symbolic rather than literal about a person's status. Besides, the attire worn by the prince in the stained glass seems to be more reflective of Medieval times rather than 18th century France (when the events of the film take place). I think the likeness of the prince, seen in the stained glass, is more of a symbol of his societal standing than of his actual appearance. If you are looking to the likeness of the prince in his torn portrait, I do see cause for confusion because he looks to be nearly the same age in the portrait as he does when he becomes human again (but maybe also slightly younger. Let's say . . . um . . . 17). This could possibly be a simple mistake on the portrait artist's part. There are many portraits in which the sitter is portrayed noticeably older (sometimes younger) than they actually are when the portrait is painted. This may be because the prince wished it (which would give him even more reason for ripping it; he thought he would never be able to live up to the expectations he created for himself when he ordered the portraitist to depict him in such a handsome, noble, striking way) or simply because the portraitist was not perfect in his craft and had a hard time depicting age. If you are also trying to figure out Chip's age, it is very possible that he is ten at the end of the story. This means that he was born human just before the spell was cast. This explains why he seems so comfortable being a little teacup and never mentions how much he misses being human, unlike the adult servants. In "Enchanted Christmas" Adam and Belle present Chip with a storybook, much like the one Lumiere presented Adam when he was only a year older than Chip. Maybe Adam sees this as a minor right of passage for Chip. Maybe Adam saw more in Lumiere's gift than he let on and this is why he thinks a storybook to be a good present for a pre-teen boy. I think the servants had been trying to calm Adam when he found his parents would be spending yet another Christmas in Paris instead of home with him. When none of them promised that they would make sure his parents would come home, he became stubborn and refused to show any thanks for the gifts offered to him. He chose to act out as a spoiled brat. However, this is only my opinion; the prince's behaviour is up for interpretation. No matter what age the prince was when he was cursed, the animators did wish him to be 21 at the end of the story. This means that the Beast is 20 years (i.e. on their 21st year) of age by this point. This has been confirmed by Glen Keane, and also in the filmmakers commentary for the extended edition, where it is specifically stated that the Beast's/Prince'Adams 21st birthday would occur at some point after the enchanted rose has lost all of it's petals and the curse had either been broken, or else become permanent. One of the Disney animators described the beast as a normal 21 year old male- unsure of himself, nervous about love, and even with a hint of childish innocence- trapped in a hideous, formidable form.

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** If you are looking at the stained glass in order to discern the prince's true age, you are looking in the wrong place.''wrong place''. Depictions of people in stained glass are typically more symbolic rather than literal about a person's status. Besides, the attire worn by the prince in the stained glass seems to be more reflective of Medieval times rather than 18th century France (when the events of the film take place). I think the likeness of the prince, seen in the stained glass, is more of a symbol of his societal standing than of his actual appearance.

If you are looking to the likeness of the prince in his torn portrait, I do see cause for confusion because [[OlderThanHeLOoks he looks to be nearly the same age in the portrait portrait]] as he does when he becomes human again (but ([[YoungerThanHeLooks but maybe also slightly younger.younger]]. Let's say . . . um . . . 17). This could possibly be a simple mistake on the portrait artist's part. part! There are many portraits in which the sitter is portrayed noticeably older (sometimes younger) than they actually are when the portrait is painted. This may be because the prince wished for it (which would give him even more reason for ripping it; he thought he would never be able to live up to the expectations he created for himself when he ordered the portraitist to depict him in such a handsome, noble, striking way) or simply because the portraitist was not perfect in his craft and had a hard time depicting age. age.

If you are also trying to figure out Chip's true age, it is [[VagueAge very possible that he is ten was ten]] at the end of the story. story... This means that he little Chip was born as a human just before ''just before'' the spell {{curse}} was cast. cast! This explains why he Chip seems so comfortable being a little teacup and never mentions how much he misses being human, human- unlike the adult servants. In "Enchanted Christmas" Adam and Belle present presented Chip with a storybook, much like the one that Lumiere presented Adam when he was only a year older than Chip. Maybe Adam sees this as a minor right rite of passage for Chip. Chip? Maybe Adam saw more in Lumiere's gift than he let on and this is why he thinks a storybook to be a good present for a pre-teen boy. boy...

I think the servants had been trying to calm Adam when he found his parents would be spending yet another Christmas in Paris instead of home with him. When none of them promised that they would make sure his parents would come home, he became stubborn and refused to show any thanks for the gifts offered to him. He chose to act out as a spoiled brat. However, this is only my opinion; the prince's behaviour is up for interpretation. No matter what age the prince was when he was cursed, the animators did wish him to be 21 at the end of the story.

This means that the Beast is 20 years (i.e. on their 21st year) of age by this point. This has been confirmed by Glen Keane, and also in the filmmakers commentary for the extended edition, where it is specifically stated that the Beast's/Prince'Adams 21st birthday would occur at some point after the enchanted rose has lost all of it's petals and the curse had either been broken, or else become permanent.permanent... One of the Disney animators described the beast as a normal 21 year old male- unsure of himself, nervous about love, and even with a hint of childish innocence- trapped in a hideous, formidable form.



** Besides that, turning the servants into non-humans would ensure they couldn't just quit and leave and stop any servant girl from breaking the spell herself.

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** Besides that, turning the servants into non-humans would ensure they couldn't just quit and leave and stop [[TakeAThirdOption any servant girl from breaking the spell herself.herself]]!

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