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***People didn't freak out about adults showing up in schools so much back then, especially in smaller places. There might be a sign asking guests to check in at the office, and as noticed, he wouldn't exactly have been a "stranger".


** This wasn't always the case, however. In [=BttF2=], Biff's meddling with the timeline somehow got Richard Nixon elected to at least four terms and the Vietnam War is still going on as of 1983. Though it could be argued his meddling was financial in nature rather then social giving him a lot more room to influence those outside of Hill Valley. After all it really isn't of world changing significance if someone did or did not get laid at the prom but millions upon millions of dollars suddenly ending up in a different set of hands...

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** This wasn't always the case, however. In [=BttF2=], Biff's meddling with the timeline somehow got Richard Nixon elected to at least four terms and the Vietnam War is still going on as of 1983. Though it could be argued his meddling was financial in nature rather then social giving him a lot more room to influence those outside of Hill Valley. After all it really isn't of world changing world-changing significance if someone did or did not get laid at the prom prom, but millions upon millions of dollars suddenly ending up in a different set of hands...



** But Uncle Joey is never mentioned in the improved timeline. It's never said if he's still in prison or not. Though a deleted scene from ''Part II'' shows that Lorainne was expecting Joey to get out of prison again in 2015 (and Marty telling her they should wait until he's been released to celebrate), while the comic book has a storyarc where Joey does get out in 1986.

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** But Uncle Joey is never mentioned in the improved timeline. It's never said if he's still in prison or not. Though a deleted scene from ''Part II'' shows that Lorainne Lorraine was expecting Joey to get out of prison again in 2015 (and Marty telling her they should wait until he's been released to celebrate), while the comic book has a storyarc story arc where Joey does get out in 1986.



They only knew Marty as "Calvin Klein" during most of the week in any case.



* A double example: First, the paralleling color-themed names of the two mayors of Hill Valley in Part I, Red Thomas and Goldie Wilson. Secondly, could their last names be a reference (even unintentional) to Thomas F."Biff Tannen" Wilson?
* I couldn't ever explain why Doc thought asking who the president of the United States was would be a foolproof plan to catching Marty in his lie; after all, how would Doc know if he was lying? But what his reaction to Marty's answer? "The actor?!" He thought that Marty, being just a kid, wouldn't be clever enough to think up a plausible name off the top of his head, and would resort to saying someone remotely famous. The joke becomes that much funnier now.
* I always wondered why Doc Brown can just walk into the high school in the first movie and have absolutely no one question him in any way. Then I realized that in 1955, he wasn't "insane and probably dangerous loner" Doc Brown, he's Emmett L. "local(and slightly eccentric) millionaire who helped out with the Manhattan Project" Brown. He was initially thought up favorably by the people of Hill Valley, until he put everything he had into his work and was shunned as a result.
** He also could've just explained it away that he was showing a relative / new prospective student (or both) around the place, being that handsome and charming young Calvin Klein fellow

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* A double example: First, the paralleling color-themed names of the two mayors of Hill Valley in Part I, Red Thomas and Goldie Wilson. Secondly, could their last names be a reference (even unintentional) to Thomas F. "Biff Tannen" Wilson?
* I couldn't ever explain why Doc thought asking who the president of the United States was would be a foolproof plan to catching Marty in his lie; after all, how would Doc know if he was lying? But what is his reaction to Marty's answer? "The actor?!" He thought that Marty, being just a kid, wouldn't be clever enough to think up a plausible name off the top of his head, and would resort to saying someone remotely famous. The joke becomes that much funnier now.
* I always wondered why Doc Brown can just walk into the high school in the first movie and have absolutely no one question him in any way. Then I realized that in 1955, he wasn't "insane and probably dangerous loner" Doc Brown, he's Emmett L. "local(and "local (and slightly eccentric) millionaire who helped out with the Manhattan Project" Brown. He was initially thought up of favorably by the people of Hill Valley, until he put everything he had into his work and was shunned as a result.
** He also could've just explained it away that he was showing a relative / new relative/new prospective student (or both) around the place, being that handsome and charming young Calvin Klein fellow



* With all the changes Marty made in the first movie, how could he and Doc Brown be sure that the time the lightning struck the clock tower hadn't changed too? By noticing that the "Save the Clock Tower" Flyer doesn't fade like the picture does!
** Marty could not do anything in 1955 that may change ''that'' thing. Mother nature does not care if Lorraine falls in love with George, Biff or someone else, of if Marty vanishes into thin air or not.

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* With all the changes Marty made in the first movie, how could he and Doc Brown be sure that the time the lightning struck the clock tower hadn't changed too? By noticing that the "Save the Clock Tower" Flyer doesn't fade like the picture does!
** Marty could not do anything
does! Of course, giving the current a place to travel might have prevented the clock from being damaged, in 1955 that may change ''that'' thing. Mother nature does not care if Lorraine falls in love with George, Biff or someone else, of if Marty vanishes into thin air or not.effect making it a crude lightning rod.



* What exactly WAS Doc's experiment with the clocks all being 25 minutes slow? Well, remember how Einstein's watch was 1 minuet slow because he'd been sent one minute into the future? Doc might be crazy, but he wouldn't put his beloved dog in danger by only testing the time-travel science on him alone. The clocks must have been some prior experiment, possibly testing the time-travel abilities of the Flux Capacitor itself, or maybe just testing sending inorganic matter through time and having it arrive unharmed. It's possible that the Delorean was more of the final stage of the project, when everything was guaranteed to work. He does seem pretty certain that the Delorean won't hit Marty and himself at the mall.

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* What exactly WAS Doc's experiment with the clocks all being 25 minutes slow? Well, remember how Einstein's watch was 1 minuet minute slow because he'd been sent one minute into the future? Doc might be crazy, but he wouldn't put his beloved dog in danger by only testing the time-travel science on him alone. The clocks must have been some prior experiment, possibly testing the time-travel abilities of the Flux Capacitor itself, or maybe just testing sending inorganic matter through time and having it arrive unharmed. It's possible that the Delorean was more of the final stage of the project, when everything was guaranteed to work. He does seem pretty certain that the Delorean won't hit Marty and himself at the mall.



* Marty's original family were a bunch of losers. His brother [[BurgerFool works in a fast food joint]], his sister is apparently completely cynical and jaded and his dad is working some low level white collar grunt job while being bullied by Biff, his superior, into working for him as well, meanwhile his mother's overweight, an alcoholic and has an apparently spiteful attitude to anybody else being even remotely happy. The house is also a craphole. After he returns to 1985 they're completely different. His brother now has some kind of office job, his sister is now more socially outgoing, his parents are HappilyMarried and successful, the house is nicer and now Biff is working as a car cleaner (presumably, George is doing the job he helped Biff into himself). Some people have criticized this ending as being too materialistic, but it's really not. Only one small change in the timeline has led to such a dramatic improvement in the [=McFly=] family, that change being George learned to stand up for himself and to not give up in the face of adversity. If you pay attention, George has only just got his first novel published, even though he presumably has been trying since the 50s. The original George probably wrote his first manuscript, got a rejection, and gave up because he was trampled down and broken. His kids, unconsciously following his example, are the same way. The new George probably wrote his first manuscript, got a rejection, and started work on another better manuscript. That also got rejected, so did the next one and the next one. But he didn't ever give up and by 1985 his persistence has finally been rewarded. In the meantime he was probably doing the job Biff was originally doing because he was clearly good enough to do it. His kids, unconsciously following his example, are the same way.

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* Marty's original family were a bunch of losers. His brother [[BurgerFool works in a fast food joint]], his sister is apparently completely cynical and jaded and his dad is working some low level white collar grunt job while being bullied by Biff, his superior, into working for him doing Biff's own work as well, meanwhile his mother's overweight, an alcoholic and has an apparently spiteful attitude to anybody else being even remotely happy. The house is also a craphole. After he returns to 1985 they're completely different. His brother now has some kind of office job, his sister is now more socially outgoing, his parents are HappilyMarried and successful, the house is nicer and now Biff is working as a car cleaner (presumably, George is doing the job he helped Biff into himself). Some people have criticized this ending as being too materialistic, but it's really not. Only one small change in the timeline has led to such a dramatic improvement in the [=McFly=] family, that change being George learned to stand up for himself and to not give up in the face of adversity. If you pay attention, George has only just got his first novel published, even though he presumably has been trying since the 50s. The original George probably wrote his first manuscript, got a rejection, and gave up because he was trampled down and broken. His kids, unconsciously following his example, are the same way. The new George probably wrote his first manuscript, got a rejection, and started work on another better manuscript. That also got rejected, so did the next one and the next one. But he didn't ever give up and by 1985 his persistence has finally been rewarded. In the meantime he was probably doing the job Biff was originally doing because he was clearly good enough to do it. His kids, unconsciously following his example, are the same way.



* In the "Time Served" storyarc from the ''[[ComicBook/BackToTheFuture comic book]]'' series, Linda seems to have a poor opinion of Biff, even though he's appeared to be nice to the whole family since George knocked him out (and the kids at least shouldn't have experienced mean Biff). But Lorraine probably told the kids the story of how she and George got together many times (like she did in the original timeline), and while Lorainne and George are now on good terms with Biff despite the AttemptedRape, Linda likely thinks of it as the serious issue that it is.

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* In the "Time Served" storyarc from the ''[[ComicBook/BackToTheFuture comic book]]'' series, Linda seems to have a poor opinion of Biff, even though he's appeared to be nice to the whole family since George knocked him out (and the kids at least shouldn't have experienced mean Biff). But Lorraine probably told the kids the story of how she and George got together many times (like she did in the original timeline), and while Lorainne Lorraine and George are now on good terms with Biff despite the AttemptedRape, Linda likely thinks of it as the serious issue that it is.



* Shortly after meeting Marty, Lorraine's father calls him an idiot. Now this could be due to him letting slip stuff about the future which doesn't make sense to them. But then, think about it. If Marty had any idea what he was doing, he would have been watching what he was saying from the beginning. His acting without thinking even kick started the whole issue with changing the past in the first place, even though he knew that George getting hit with the car was what brought his parents together. Finally, we learn in the sequals he effectively ruins his life TWICE due to his pride. Lorraine's father had it right. Marty is an idiot.

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* Shortly after meeting Marty, Lorraine's father calls him an idiot. Now this could be due to him letting slip stuff about the future which doesn't make sense to them. But then, think about it. If Marty had any idea what he was doing, he would have been watching what he was saying from the beginning. His acting without thinking even kick started the whole issue with changing the past in the first place, even though he knew that George getting hit with the car was what brought his parents together. Finally, we learn in the sequals sequels he effectively ruins his life TWICE due to his pride. Lorraine's father had it right. Marty is an idiot.



** How is that fridge brilliance?
*** It's not, it's FridgeHorror. (And HypocriticalHumor.)

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* Shortly after meeting Marty, Lorraine's father calls him an idiot. Now this could be due to him letting slip stuff about the future which doesn't make sense to them. But then, think about it. If Marty had any idea what he was doing, he would have been watching what he was saying from the beginning. His acting without thinking even kick started the whole issue with changing the past in the first place, even though he knew that George getting hit with the car was what brought his parents together. Finally, we learn in the sequals he effectively ruins his life TWICE due to his pride. Lorraine's father had it right. Marty is an idiot.

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*** Doc being the BunglingInventor that he is, it's very likely that the Time Machine (and its miniature) are not the only creations of his that are MadeOfIncendium, especially if his track record is consistent failure; he need not be successful to have burned off all his hair, and may in fact be surprised that he managed not to lose the rest of it for the next 30 years.


Actually, they only knew Marty as "Calvin Klein" throughout the entire 1955 sequence?

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Actually, they They only knew Marty as "Calvin Klein" throughout during most of the entire 1955 sequence?week in any case.

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Actually, they only knew Marty as "Calvin Klein" throughout the entire 1955 sequence?


* If Marty was so influential to George and Lorraine that they named a kid after this guy they met, how come it's the name of their third child instead of their first? Simple, he really ''wasn't'' that influential by the time their first child was born (8 years or so after they got romantic). Whatever inspiration that made them come up with the name Marty in the original timeline (friend, celebrity, name from a baby book, etc.) ''is still the inspiration for them'' in 1967 or so when Marty is born, albeit with a little extra emphasis "Oh, that's the same name as that guy who helped us meet each other, wasn't it?"


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* If Marty was so influential to George and Lorraine that they named a kid after this guy they met, how come it's the name of their third child instead of their first? Simple, he really ''wasn't'' that influential by the time their first child was born (8 years or so after they got romantic). Whatever inspiration that made them come up with the name Marty in the original timeline (friend, celebrity, name from a baby book, etc.) ''is still the inspiration for them'' in 1967 or so when Marty is born, albeit with a little extra emphasis "Oh, that's the same name as that guy who helped us meet each other, wasn't it?"

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* If Marty was so influential to George and Lorraine that they named a kid after this guy they met, how come it's the name of their third child instead of their first? Simple, he really ''wasn't'' that influential by the time their first child was born (8 years or so after they got romantic). Whatever inspiration that made them come up with the name Marty in the original timeline (friend, celebrity, name from a baby book, etc.) ''is still the inspiration for them'' in 1967 or so when Marty is born, albeit with a little extra emphasis "Oh, that's the same name as that guy who helped us meet each other, wasn't it?"


* People often complain that Marty didn't conquer his fears or do what his dad did and get extra confidence to get his dream career. I thought the same until I thought of it, Marty was terrified that people were going to reject his music, and only did the audition in front of a few teachers, but he got over it and managed to do it in front of hundreds of people. Sure they didn't like the end of it, but he is so confident by the end of "Johnny B. Goode" that he says "I guess you guys aren't ready for that yet. But your kids are gonna love it!" He might not just be talking about Rock & Roll but about his music as well.
** That's good, but there's another (perhaps complementary) explanation. At the beginning of the film, Marty's rant about "I don't think I could take that kind of a rejection" is said almost word for word by George in 1955 (and Marty even says in 1985 that "I sound like my old man"). Seeing that, with just the courage to take the risk, his father made good on his creative ambitions may have shown Marty that he can do exactly the same thing.
** Plus in Part 2 he sees himself playing "Johnny B. Goode" and figures he's pretty good. It's there in his nod/smirk.
** In a deleted scene set just after the [=McFly=] family dinner in 1985, we saw Marty put his demo tape in an envelope, addressed to a record company, but he just put it down and decided not to go and post it. At the end of the film, once he's back from 1955 and wakes up in his bed, before he even realises his family have changed, you can see him carrying the envelope, implying he's going to post it after all. His trip to the past did teach him to be more confident, and he's actually doing exactly what Jennifer suggested he do: send his tape to a record company and see what happens next.
* People love to bring up how nonsensical it is that George, no matter how rage-fuelled, was somehow able to knock out Biff in a single punch. But look at the punch closer, George originally tries to hit Biff with his right hand, only for Biff to grab him and put him in an arm-lock, and it's only when Lorraine is pushed to the ground that George spins round and smacks Biff with his LEFT hand. Now earlier in the film we see George writing his sci-fi stories in the lunch-room, and he's using his right hand. But even back in the 50s, it was commonplace for schools to insist on right-handedness even if a person was born a lefty. In this case, it's possible that George was born left-handed, forced to pretend he was right-handed by school (since we see him writing with his right-hand) but still managed to maintain a degree of dominant strength in his left hand. As such, when he went up against Biff, of course his right hand was useless, whereas his left hand was basically a WMD against Biff's smug face
* In Real Life, the early model DMC-12s were plagued with alternator issues. The battery was infamously unreliable when several appliances were running, leaving drivers stranded (most famously, Johnny Carson was a victim of the DMC-12's poor battery performance). The frequent stalling of the [=DeLorean=] in Part 1 could be plot convenience... Or it could be a reference to the [=Delorean=]'s reputation for unreliability.
** Two other possibilities. One: the Libyans actually managed to hit the [=DeLorean=] during the parking lot chase and damaged the starter and engine. This might also explain the short circuit from Part II. Two: Each time the car stalls, another [=DeLorean=] is about to time travel. When Marty stalls just before returning to 1985, the Marty and Doc from Part II are across town, burning the Sports Almanac, and sending Doc back to 1885. When the car stalls upon Marty's return to 1985, his other self is about to time travel back to 1955. It seems only one [=DeLorean=] can time travel at any given point.
*** Well, Marty did watch himself go back to 1955. Another time travel did occur shortly before he reached the mall on foot, however; Einstein was sent forward in time one minute. The last short-out could, by your theory, be attributed to that.
** That's really good. It could also be that the [=DeLorean=] stalls as a way of time itself trying subtly to prevent paradoxes. The most notable stall is Marty when he finally returns to 1985, and he has to run to the mall on foot, where he arrives basically just in time to see his past self travel back to 1955. The stall not only prevented two Marty's from being in exactly the same place at the same time, but also prevented Marty from interfering with the event of him going back to 1955 in the first place (which would have been an almost unavoidable side-effect of trying to warn Doc.)
** There is a third possibility. Just after arriving in 1955, Marty is forced to escape the Peabody farm after Old Man Peabody mistakes him for an alien and shot at him. In the confusion, Marty accidentally ran over a pine tree. A branch may have snagged some electrical wiring, causing an intermittent short circuit or caused some sort of damage to the electrical system. Marty even told 1955 Doc that there was something wrong with the starter, so 1955 Doc probably repaired the damage later on (the car's rear end was jacked up--probably to examine why it wouldn't start), didn't do a good enough job and it was 1985 Doc (who knew the car) that finished repairs. Notably, between that point in the film and after Marty returns to 1985 is the only time when the car stalls or fails to start. The only other time the engine failed was simply due to lack of gasoline and no suitable substitute fuel in Part III.
* One may wonder why 1955 Lorraine/her family would take Marty's pants off while he was knocked out. Then he realized that since the car hit Marty in his leg/shin/thigh area, they probably took his pants off in order to check for bruises or any other serious injuries. Obviously he wasn't injured, so they just forgot to put his pants back on or had a hard time doing so.
* When Marty first shows up at 1955 Doc Brown's house in the first installment, he's testing a thought reading device. He makes a series of guesses as to why Marty is there, ending with noticing Marty's jacket and asking if he's looking for donations for the coast guard. Running gag, OR, did Doc actually pick up the memory of Marty being asked if he's with the Coast Guard earlier in the day?
** He sure did. "You come from a great distance?" refers to how Marty traveled 30 years from 1985 to 1955. Next, "You want me to buy a subscription to the Saturday Evening Post?" refers to how Marty [[NewspaperDating uses a newspaper to verify that he's in the past]]. Lastly, "You want me to make a donation to the Coast Guard Youth Auxiliary?" refers to both the woman who wanted donations to save the clock tower in 1985, and the fact that a few people in 1955 (Lou the cafe owner, Skinhead the gang member, and Stella Baines) thought Marty was a sailor judging from his vest.
*** On the other hand, Doc is touching Marty's vest before he says the stuff about the Coast Guard, so he clearly isn't getting this one from his machine. Later, he himself says that the Time Machine is his first invention that actually worked.
*** While several characters from the '50s naturally assume Marty's vest is a life preserver, it is Marty who tells Lorraine's mom that he works for the Coast Guard. Doc doesn't know Marty said that, yet he's the only other person that day who associates Marty's jacket specifically with "Coast Guard." That seems a funny coincidence, and does lend support to the idea that the mind-reading device really is picking up something.
*** I just figured that Doc was too distracted by the apparent failure to notice that he had achieved a partial success.
*** To be fair, after Marty explained what happened, Doc says that the thought-reading device "doesn't work at all!" Maybe Doc considered it one of his few working inventions in Twin Pines' 1985!
*** Plus, Marty's probably not in the best state of mind anyways, so his head's gotta be all over the place even before Doc suddenly hooked him up to the crazy hat without explanation.

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* People often complain that Marty didn't conquer his fears or do what his dad did and get extra confidence to get his dream career. I thought the same until I thought of it, But Marty was terrified that people were going to reject his music, and only did the audition in front of a few teachers, but he got over it and managed to do it in front of hundreds of people. Sure they They didn't like the end of it, but he is so confident by the end of "Johnny B. Goode" that he says "I guess you guys aren't ready for that yet. But your kids are gonna love it!" He might not just be talking about Rock & Roll but about his music as well.
** That's good, but there's another (perhaps complementary) explanation. At the beginning of the film, Marty's rant about "I don't think I could take that kind of a rejection" is said almost word for word by George in 1955 (and Marty even says in 1985 that "I sound like my old man"). Seeing that, with just the courage to take the risk, his father made good on his creative ambitions may have shown Marty that he can do exactly the same thing.
** Plus in Part 2 he sees himself playing "Johnny B. Goode" and figures he's pretty good. It's there in his nod/smirk.
** In a deleted scene set just after the [=McFly=] family dinner in 1985, we saw Marty put his demo tape in an envelope, addressed to a record company, but he just put it down and decided not to go and post it. At the end of the film, once he's back from 1955 and wakes up in his bed, before he even realises his family have changed, you can see him carrying the envelope, implying he's going to post it after all. His trip to the past did teach him to be more confident, and he's actually doing exactly what Jennifer suggested he do: send his tape to a record company and see what happens next.
* People love to bring up how nonsensical it is It seems inconceivable that George, no matter how rage-fuelled, was somehow able to knock out Biff in a single punch. But look looking at the punch closer, George originally tries to hit Biff with his right hand, only for Biff to grab him and put him in an arm-lock, and it's only when Lorraine is pushed to the ground that George spins round and smacks Biff with his LEFT hand. Now earlier in the film we see George writing his sci-fi stories in the lunch-room, and he's using his right hand. But even back in the 50s, it was commonplace for schools to insist on right-handedness even if a person was born a lefty. In this case, it's possible that George was born left-handed, forced to pretend he was right-handed by school (since we see him writing with his right-hand) but still managed to maintain a degree of dominant strength in his left hand. As such, when he went up against Biff, of course his right hand was useless, whereas his left hand was basically a WMD against Biff's smug face
stronger.
* In Real Life, the early model DMC-12s were plagued with alternator issues. The battery was infamously unreliable when several appliances were running, leaving drivers stranded (most famously, Johnny Carson was a victim of the DMC-12's poor battery performance). The frequent stalling of the [=DeLorean=] in Part 1 could be plot convenience... Or convenience or it could be a reference to the [=Delorean=]'s reputation for unreliability.
** Two other possibilities. One: the Libyans actually managed to hit the [=DeLorean=] during the parking lot chase and damaged the starter and engine. This might also explain the short circuit from Part II. Two: Each time the car stalls, another [=DeLorean=] is about to time travel. When Marty stalls just before returning to 1985, the Marty and Doc from Part II are across town, burning the Sports Almanac, and sending Doc back to 1885. When the car stalls upon Marty's return to 1985, his other self is about to time travel back to 1955. It seems only one [=DeLorean=] can time travel at any given point.
*** Well, Marty did watch himself go back to 1955. Another time travel did occur shortly before he reached the mall on foot, however; Einstein was sent forward in time one minute. The last short-out could, by your theory, be attributed to that.
** That's really good. It could also be that the [=DeLorean=] stalls as a way of time itself trying subtly to prevent paradoxes. The most notable stall is Marty when he finally returns to 1985, and he has to run to the mall on foot, where he arrives basically just in time to see his past self travel back to 1955. The stall not only prevented two Marty's from being in exactly the same place at the same time, but also prevented Marty from interfering with the event of him going back to 1955 in the first place (which would have been an almost unavoidable side-effect of trying to warn Doc.)
** There is a third possibility. Just after arriving in 1955, Marty is forced to escape the Peabody farm after Old Man Peabody mistakes him for an alien and shot at him. In the confusion, Marty accidentally ran over a pine tree. A branch may have snagged some electrical wiring, causing an intermittent short circuit or caused some sort of damage to the electrical system. Marty even told 1955 Doc that there was something wrong with the starter, so 1955 Doc probably repaired the damage later on (the car's rear end was jacked up--probably to examine why it wouldn't start), didn't do a good enough job and it was 1985 Doc (who knew the car) that finished repairs. Notably, between that point in the film and after Marty returns to 1985 is the only time when the car stalls or fails to start. The only other time the engine failed was simply due to lack of gasoline and no suitable substitute fuel in Part III.
unreliability.
* One may wonder why 1955 Lorraine/her family would take Marty's pants off while he was knocked out. Then he realized that since Since the car hit Marty in his leg/shin/thigh area, they probably took his pants off in order to check for bruises or any other serious injuries. Obviously he wasn't injured, so they just forgot to put his pants back on or had a hard time doing so.
* When Marty first shows up at 1955 Doc Brown's house in the first installment, he's testing a thought reading thought-reading device. He makes a series of guesses as to why Marty is there, ending with noticing Marty's jacket and asking if he's looking for donations for the coast guard. Running gag, OR, did Doc actually pick up the memory of Marty being asked if he's with the Coast Guard earlier in the day?
** He sure did. "You come from a great distance?" refers to how Marty traveled 30 years from 1985 to 1955. Next, "You want me to buy a subscription to the Saturday Evening Post?" refers to how Marty [[NewspaperDating uses a newspaper to verify that he's in the past]]. Lastly, "You want me to make a donation to the Coast Guard Youth Auxiliary?" refers to both the woman who wanted donations to save the clock tower in 1985, and the fact that a few people in 1955 (Lou the cafe owner, Skinhead the gang member, and Stella Baines) thought Marty was a sailor judging from his vest.
*** On the other hand, Doc is touching Marty's vest before he says the stuff about the Coast Guard, so he clearly isn't getting this one from his machine. Later, he himself says that the Time Machine is his first invention that actually worked.
*** While several characters from the '50s naturally assume Marty's vest is a life preserver, it is Marty who tells Lorraine's mom that he works for the Coast Guard. Doc doesn't know Marty said that, yet he's the only other person that day who associates Marty's jacket specifically with "Coast Guard." That seems a funny coincidence, and does lend support to the idea that the mind-reading device really is picking up something.
*** I just figured that Doc was too distracted by the apparent failure to notice that he had achieved a partial success.
*** To be fair, after Marty explained what happened, Doc says that the thought-reading device "doesn't work at all!" Maybe Doc considered it one of his few working inventions in Twin Pines' 1985!
*** Plus, Marty's probably not in the best state of mind anyways, so his head's gotta be all over the place even before Doc suddenly hooked him up to the crazy hat without explanation.



** It's also a neat metaphor. When you're in the [=DeLorean=], you don't need to ''look'' back, because you can always ''go'' back.
* If the Libyans knew jack squat about building a nuke, they never would have gone to Doc Brown in the first place.

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** It's also a neat metaphor. When you're in the [=DeLorean=], you don't need to ''look'' back, because you can always ''go'' back.
* If the Libyans knew jack squat anything about building a nuke, they never would have gone to Doc Brown in the first place.



*** What's horrifying about this is that Doc had been told in 1955 that he invents a time machine by 1985, 1955 Doc must have reached a revelation that he has thirty years to invent a working time machine or the universe gets torn apart by the paradox if he fails. This explains a lot about why he spends the next thirty years of his life pouring his entire family fortune into his research, his willingness to deal with Libyan terrorists and his rejection of being told any more about future events by Marty citing that he refuses to take the "responsibility" as a lot is already riding on him. No pressure, right?



** Alternatively, Marty simply has "no concept of time". Marty could have wasted his only opportunity to go back to the future because he felt he needed to change his clothes. Moreover, at the beginning of the film, he arrives late to school for the ''fourth'' day in a row. Granted, the Doc set his clocks back 25 minutes on the fourth day, but why was Marty late the other three days? Maybe he's just a habitually late person. The reason he only gave himself ten minutes to warn the Doc was because Marty completely underestimated the amount of time required to tell him, with or without the car.
*** This is further reinforced by the fact that Marty ''has a freaking watch''.
*** It's also worth noting that, possibly as a mistake in the film, Marty says he'll go back by 10 minutes, but actually dials 11 minutes into the time-circuits. Maybe the kid just REALLY doesn't know a damn thing about time in general, never mind time-TRAVEL
** Another in the first film: Doc says he's calculated the exact time Marty has to start to hit the cable the instant the lightening hits. Marty misses the start time, but still gets there in time. Why was Doc wrong? He miscalculated the [=DeLorean=]'s more advanced acceleration compared to the contemporary cars he was familiar with.
*** Worth noting the [=DeLorean=] hits 88 miles an hour well before it hits the cable.
** Marty's plan was really kind of dumb. Even if he had arrived in time to warn Doc, his very appearance would have probably screwed up time again, because it would have prevented 1985 Marty from being sent back--thus generating a new paradox. Marty wasn't thinking clearly when he came up with the "10 minutes early" plan, because he was desperate to save Doc's life, and he was already a reckless and impulsive teen who still didn't fully understand the consequences of meddling with time.
*** Consider for a moment that he wouldn't even need to muck up his other self from going back to 1985. ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'' has a central theme based around not seeing your other self (to avoid a paradox). In Jennifer's case in the aforementioned film the "best" scenario conveniently happens. Of course, who's to say that Marty would be so fortunate? If Marty had made it in time and his past self had seen his future self that alone might have been enough to create a galaxy/universe destroying paradox. The only reason that Biff seemed to be immune is because he was probably too stupid to realize that he was with his future self or something. Of course this assume that Doc's musing on paradoxes is even correct (though would you really want to take the risk?)



** It may also be that after the events of the first movie, Marty's father now has a reputation for bravery and standing up to bullies, that Marty may feel now obligated to live up to.
** The whole "chicken thing" may actually be from the original timeline. Remember Marty originally never liked being compared to his father because he thought of his old man as a ''coward''. Even after the timeline was changed, that habit still lingered.
*** Not to mention he does seem slightly hot-blooded to begin with in Part 1 (nearly starting a fistfight with Biff in the cafeteria until Strickland shows up) even though nobody calls him chicken, perhaps as a result of this. After part 1, he's doing his best to avoid messing with the timeline more by not getting into fights like when he walked away from Biff after retrieving the almanac and when he planned not to be anywhere ''near'' Hill Valley when he and Buford were supposed to fight, since fighting is what got his mom ''really'' hot for him back in Part 1. But calling him a coward still gets under his skin.
** He had 5 minutes with his new dad before Doc picked him up. My guess is that it's the ripple effect. In the ideal 1985, Marty has grown up with his cool dad and has become a bit cocky about it, and his new traits are slowly replacing his old ones of original 1985.

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** We've seen how terrible Biff treats Marty's mother in 1985A, and it's heavily implied that she's being raped by Biff. It's horrible in on itself, and then you remember that Marty has a ''sister''. Given that Biff has complete power over the [=McFlys=], imagine what Biff could be doing to Marty's sister.


** Additionally, in that same arc, Lorraine still sees good in Joey despite having gone to jail, saying that when people make mistakes they become better people. It's possible she had this mindset towards Biff after he got knocked out - he was a horrible person but was taught a lesson and became a better person (at least to George and Larraine).

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** Additionally, in that same arc, Lorraine still sees good in Joey despite having gone to jail, saying that when people make mistakes they become better people. It's possible she had this mindset towards Biff after he got knocked out - he was a horrible person but was taught a lesson and became a better person (at least to George and Larraine).Lorraine).

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* In the "Time Served" storyarc from the ''[[ComicBook/BackToTheFuture comic book]]'' series, Linda seems to have a poor opinion of Biff, even though he's appeared to be nice to the whole family since George knocked him out (and the kids at least shouldn't have experienced mean Biff). But Lorraine probably told the kids the story of how she and George got together many times (like she did in the original timeline), and while Lorainne and George are now on good terms with Biff despite the AttemptedRape, Linda likely thinks of it as the serious issue that it is.
** Additionally, in that same arc, Lorraine still sees good in Joey despite having gone to jail, saying that when people make mistakes they become better people. It's possible she had this mindset towards Biff after he got knocked out - he was a horrible person but was taught a lesson and became a better person (at least to George and Larraine).


* Biff noticing the cars "blindspot" in he beginning of the movie is explained by him being a car expert later on. However, consider the possibility that Marty's dad ''did'' know about it and was trying to secretly murder his boss, or he was ''suicidal''. Or both.


* In the first film, Marty experiences what should be a terrible fear of many people: watching a close friend (Doc Brown) die and being unable to do anything to stop it. What could be worse? How about seeing that friend (seemingly) die a second time, again being unable to do anything, and this time knowing it's going to happen?


* Biff noticing the cars "blindspot" in he beginning of the movie is explained by I'm being a car expert later on. However, consider the possibility that Marty's dad ''did'' know about it and was trying to secretly murder his boss, or he was ''suicidal''. Or both.

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* Biff noticing the cars "blindspot" in he beginning of the movie is explained by I'm him being a car expert later on. However, consider the possibility that Marty's dad ''did'' know about it and was trying to secretly murder his boss, or he was ''suicidal''. Or both.

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