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* TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt: The ''Final'' in the franchise title gradually begins to refer to how each game deals with an apocalypse descending upon their respective settings.


* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' (1994): FF continues its steady march toward cyberpunk with this {{steampunk}} adventure, set in the aftermath of a world-destroying magical war. A quasi-fascist Emperor has discovered a way to replicate magic through artificial means, which can only mean trouble. The job system is shelved, yet again, though the character classes themselves have been rolled into 14 unique player characters. The most aesthetically and musically stunning FF of its time, pushing the SNES to its limits. This marks the point where Square became a god-tier developer.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' (1994): FF continues its steady march toward cyberpunk with this {{steampunk}} adventure, set in the aftermath of a world-destroying magical war. A quasi-fascist Emperor has discovered a way to replicate revive the lost power of magic through artificial means, which can only mean trouble. The job system is shelved, yet again, though the character classes themselves have been rolled into 14 unique player characters. The most aesthetically and musically stunning FF of its time, pushing the SNES to its limits. This marks the point where Square became a god-tier developer.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' (2000): [[WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles No school like the old-school]]. IX is a throwback to the NES/SNES titles, right down to the SuperDeformed characters, a four-man party, and endless {{call back}}s to past games. The story involves a roguish thief who tries to kidnap a princess, who turns out to want to be kidnapped to escape her inexplicably [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen tyrant mother]] who recently came under the influence of a mysterious arms dealer. A world-spanning adventure follows as the thief, princess, her loyal knight, a young boy struggling with his existence, and several others fight to prevent a war from ensuing. Also aliens. Notable for seeming bright and cheery but being one of the darker entries in the series.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' (2000): [[WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles No school like the old-school]]. IX is a throwback to the NES/SNES titles, right down to the SuperDeformed characters, a four-man party, a medieval fantasy world, and endless {{call back}}s to past games. The story involves a roguish thief who tries to kidnap a princess, who turns out to want to be kidnapped to escape her inexplicably [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen tyrant mother]] who recently came under the influence of a mysterious arms dealer. A world-spanning adventure follows as the thief, princess, her loyal knight, a young boy struggling with his existence, and several others fight to prevent a war from ensuing. Also aliens. Notable for seeming bright and cheery but being one of the darker entries in the series.



** Released on [=PS2=], [=PS3=], Vita, [=PS4=], PC
** Set for release on: Switch, [=XB1=]

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** Released on [=PS2=], [=PS3=], Vita, [=PS4=], PC
** Set for release on:
PC, Switch, [=XB1=]



** Released on: [=PS2=], [=PS4=], PC
** Set for release on: Switch, [=XB1=]

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** Released on: [=PS2=], [=PS4=], PC
** Set for release on:
PC, Switch, [=XB1=]



** ''Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren'': Midgar has fallen into decay, a virus known as Geostigma is scourging the population, and a band of fanatics have styled themselves as Sephiroth's disciples. All in all, things might have been better with Shinra still in charge. Everyone from the game reunites for this CG animated movie, [[HesJustHiding even the dead ones]].

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** ''Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren'': Two years following the original game, Midgar has fallen into decay, a virus known as Geostigma is scourging the population, and a band of fanatics have styled themselves as Sephiroth's disciples. All in all, things might have been better with Shinra still in charge. Everyone from the game reunites for this CG animated movie, [[HesJustHiding even the dead ones]].

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** ''Final Fantasy XI: Rhapsodies of Vana'diel''


** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is an UrbanFantasy game that looks otherwise indistinguishable from contemporary reality, with massive cities, cars and highways, and everything that comes with existing alongside VancianMagic, SummonMagic, [[EldritchAbomination daemons]], and TheEmpire using magitek.

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'' is an UrbanFantasy game that looks otherwise indistinguishable from contemporary reality, with massive cities, cars and highways, and everything that comes with existing alongside VancianMagic, SummonMagic, [[EldritchAbomination daemons]], and TheEmpire using magitek.


** ''Final Fantasy XIV: Stormblood'' (2017) was the second expansion and was released on PC and [=PS4=]. It continued the story in another new region and introduced the Red Mage and Samurai playable Jobs. FFXIV's [=PS3=] service was closed upon Stormblood's release.
** ''Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers'' (2019) is the third expansion and will be released on PC and [=PS4=]. It will take the story to Garlemald and will introduce the Viera as a playable race and at least two playable Jobs, including the Blue Mage (which was released prior the expansion) and the Gunbreaker. Set to be released July 2nd, 2019.

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** ''Final Fantasy XIV: Stormblood'' (2017) was the second expansion and was released on PC and [=PS4=]. It continued the story in another new region and introduced the Red Mage, Samurai, and Blue Mage and Samurai as playable Jobs. FFXIV's [=PS3=] service was closed upon Stormblood's release.
** ''Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers'' (2019) is the third expansion and will be released on PC and [=PS4=]. It will take the story to Garlemald and will introduce the Viera and Hrothgar as a playable race races, and at least two playable Jobs, including the Blue Mage (which was released prior the expansion) Jobs: Gunbreaker and the Gunbreaker.Dancer. Set to be released July 2nd, 2019.

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* ScienceFantasy: While the first games were predominantly medieval fantasy, the series began to dabble more with mixing sci-fi trappings in later titles:
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' featured light sci-fi elements later in the game, including a prototypical SuperBoss in the form of the Warmech.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' remains largely medieval fantasy throughout, but also features a starship that takes the heroes to the moon, which was home to a long-lost technologically-gifted civilization.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' introduced the concept of {{Magitek}} to the series, with TheEmpire (which has a strong SteamPunk vibe) employing magically-empowered supersoldiers and outfitting their rank-and-file soldiers with [[MiniMecha magitek armors]]. One of your party members, Edgar, also makes extensive use of technological "tools" while also being king of a high-tech castle.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' is set in an UrbanFantasy world with modern infrastructure and cars, motorcycles, and robots powered by TheLifestream.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' has a strong CyberPunk aesthetic, with the game's resident high-tech society of Cocoon being powered by magically-empowered fal'Cie.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has MagicVersusTechnology in its setting, with the city-states of Eorzea, technologically lagging yet magically gifted, in a war against the Garlean Empire, whose people are physically incapable of using magic and compensate by making extensive use of magitek.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' is an UrbanFantasy game that looks otherwise indistinguishable from contemporary reality, with massive cities, cars and highways, and everything that comes with existing alongside VancianMagic, SummonMagic, [[EldritchAbomination daemons]], and TheEmpire using magitek.


* FireIceLightning: There are many recurring types of elemental attacks, but these three are by far the most prominent in the overwhelming majority of ''Final Fantasy'' games. FFX puts Water on an equal footing with these three.

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* FireIceLightning: There are many recurring types of elemental attacks, but these three are by far the most prominent in the overwhelming majority of ''Final Fantasy'' games. FFX puts Water on an equal footing with these three.''Final Fantasy II'' adds [[PoisonousPerson Poison]] as a fourth element to the set, opposed to Lightning in a similar manner to Fire and Ice's obvious dichotomy. ''Final Fantasy X'' adds [[MakingASplash Water]] to the mix, similarly set in opposition to Lightning.


* BossBonanza: Pretty much common in ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games as a rule for the series. Perhaps the only semi-aversion is ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' because ''all'' of the bosses in the FinalDungeon save for the Emperor himself were sealed in chests.

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* BossBonanza: Pretty much common in The ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games as a rule for the series. series' favorite leadup to its final boss battles. Perhaps the only semi-aversion is ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' because ''all'' of the bosses in the FinalDungeon FinalDungeon, save for the Emperor himself himself, were sealed in chests.chests and therefore optional to fight.


* {{BFS}}: Swords that in real life would be very difficult if not impossible to wield "properly".

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* {{BFS}}: Swords The series has an amplitude of swords that in real life would be very difficult difficult, if not impossible outright impossible, to wield "properly".''at all,'' let alone with any semblance of efficacy.


* AnyoneCanDie: So far, no ''Final Fantasy'' game has gotten to the end without the death of at least one major character. Usually this is done via HeroicSacrifice, but not always. Hit full force in ''VII''; Aerith's death was seen as shocking at the time because it came out of nowhere, and WordOfGod is she was chosen as the one to die because she didn't fit the mold of the "hard-boiled last-man-standing warrior" that had been the sacrificial lamb in earlier games. A few games even kill off the main protagonist, though usually not until the end of the story. II is especially notable as the player is treated to the deaths of a whole third of the playable cast. It and IV basically used it as justification to make room in the party, although, in the latter. [[DisneyDeath most characters turn out to be alive in the end]].

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* AnyoneCanDie: So far, no ''Final Fantasy'' game has gotten to the end without the death of at least one major character. Usually this is done via HeroicSacrifice, but not always. Hit full force in ''VII''; Aerith's death was seen as shocking at the time because it came out of nowhere, and WordOfGod is she was chosen as the one to die because she didn't fit the mold of the "hard-boiled last-man-standing warrior" that had been the sacrificial lamb in earlier games. A few games even kill off the main protagonist, though usually not until the end of the story. II ''II'' is especially notable as the player is treated to the deaths of a whole third of the playable cast. It and IV ''IV'' basically used it as justification to make room in the party, although, in the latter. [[DisneyDeath most characters turn out to be alive in the end]].



* AttackBackfire: ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' introduced the idea of monsters absorbing certain elemental attacks to regain health. More directly, the Reflect spell also causes spells to bounce back.

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* AttackBackfire: ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' introduced the idea of monsters absorbing damage from certain elemental attacks to regain health. elements and recovering health; particularly nasty is that draining spells ''work in reverse'' against enemies that absorb them, harming the caster as well as healing the target. More directly, the Reflect spell also causes incoming spells to bounce back.


* AnyoneCanDie: So far, no ''Final Fantasy'' game has gotten to the end without the death of at least one major character. Usually this is done via HeroicSacrifice, but not always. Hit full force in ''VII''; Aerith's death was seen as shocking at the time because it came out of nowhere, and WordOfGod is she was chosen as the one to die because she didn't fit the mold of the "hard-boiled last-man-standing warrior" that had been the sacrificial lamb in earlier games. A few games even kill off the main protagonist, though usually not until the end of the story. 2 is especially notable as the player is treated to the deaths of a whole third of the playable cast. It and 4 basically used it as justification to make room in the party, though in the latter most characters turn out to be alive in the end.

to:

* AnyoneCanDie: So far, no ''Final Fantasy'' game has gotten to the end without the death of at least one major character. Usually this is done via HeroicSacrifice, but not always. Hit full force in ''VII''; Aerith's death was seen as shocking at the time because it came out of nowhere, and WordOfGod is she was chosen as the one to die because she didn't fit the mold of the "hard-boiled last-man-standing warrior" that had been the sacrificial lamb in earlier games. A few games even kill off the main protagonist, though usually not until the end of the story. 2 II is especially notable as the player is treated to the deaths of a whole third of the playable cast. It and 4 IV basically used it as justification to make room in the party, though although, in the latter latter. [[DisneyDeath most characters turn out to be alive in the end.end]].


* AnyoneCanDie: So far, no ''Final Fantasy'' game has gotten to the end without the death of at least one major character. Usually this is done via HeroicSacrifice, but not always. Hit full force in ''VII''; Aerith's death was seen as shocking at the time because it came out of nowhere, and WordOfGod is she was chosen as the one to die because she didn't fit the mold of the "hard-boiled last-man-standing warrior" that had been the sacrificial lamb in earlier games. A few games even kill off the main protagonist, though usually not until the end of the story. 2 is especially notable as the player is treated to the deaths of almost half of the playable cast. It and 4 basically used it as justification to make room in the party, though in the latter most characters turn out to be alive in the end.

to:

* AnyoneCanDie: So far, no ''Final Fantasy'' game has gotten to the end without the death of at least one major character. Usually this is done via HeroicSacrifice, but not always. Hit full force in ''VII''; Aerith's death was seen as shocking at the time because it came out of nowhere, and WordOfGod is she was chosen as the one to die because she didn't fit the mold of the "hard-boiled last-man-standing warrior" that had been the sacrificial lamb in earlier games. A few games even kill off the main protagonist, though usually not until the end of the story. 2 is especially notable as the player is treated to the deaths of almost half a whole third of the playable cast. It and 4 basically used it as justification to make room in the party, though in the latter most characters turn out to be alive in the end.


* RecurringElement: Cid, people named Highwind, moogles, chocobos, summons such as Ifrit and Bahamut, monsters such as Bomb and Cactuar, Ultima and Omega Weapons, Gilgamesh, and crystals.

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* RecurringElement: Cid, people named Highwind, moogles, chocobos, summons such as Ifrit and Bahamut, monsters such as Bomb and Cactuar, Ultima and Omega Weapons, Gilgamesh, Genji equipment, and crystals.

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* AcidAttack: The recurring ability Acid, an enemy-exclusive attack that douses the target in corrosive liquid and can inflict status ailments. In some games, [[PowerCopying Blue Mages]] can learn it by withstanding the attack.


* AlliterativeTitle
* AltumVidetur: The series has always loved putting in gratuitous Latin in places, but in recent years game titles have been subject to this as well (''Dissidia'', ''Dissidia Duodecim'' and ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'', among others). An increased usage of Latin in later games may or may not have been due to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'''s FinalBoss theme.

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* AlliterativeTitle
* AltumVidetur: The series has always loved putting in gratuitous Latin in places, but in recent years game titles have been subject to this as well (''Dissidia'', ''Dissidia Duodecim'' and ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'', among others). An increased usage of Latin in later games may or may not have been due to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'''s FinalBoss theme.
%%* AlliterativeTitle


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* GratuitousLatin: The series has always loved putting in gratuitous Latin in places, but in recent years game titles have been subject to this as well (''Dissidia'', ''Dissidia Duodecim'' and ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'', among others). An increased usage of Latin in later games may or may not have been due to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'''s FinalBoss theme.

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