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History Film / TheSongOfBernadette

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* WhamLine: "It may be that there is a sign for you after all," says Bernadette immediately prior to revealing her [[spoiler:crippling leg tumour and tuberculosis of the bone]].
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: The music you hear is by Alfred Newman, but Igor Stravinsky had been the first choice. He had the music for the first apparition already planned before he even saw a screening of the film, and when Perlberg and King asked him to change some of it Stravinsky refused and was released from his contract. Now, put on his "Symphony in Three Movements," second movement, and cue up your DVD to where Bernadette, Marie and Jeanne are running over the hills to Massabielle. This is actually more evocative of a bizarre yet tenderly sacred mood than Newman's more traditionally religious approach.

to:

* WhamLine: "It may be that there is a sign for you after all," says Bernadette immediately prior to revealing her [[spoiler:crippling leg tumour and tuberculosis of the bone]].
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: The music you hear is by Alfred Newman, but Igor Stravinsky had been the first choice. He had the music for the first apparition already planned before he even saw a screening of the film, and when Perlberg and King asked him to change some of it Stravinsky refused and was released from his contract. Now, put on his "Symphony in Three Movements," second movement, and cue up your DVD to where Bernadette, Marie and Jeanne are running over the hills to Massabielle. This is actually more evocative of a bizarre yet tenderly sacred mood than Newman's more traditionally religious approach.
bone]].


* WhamLine: "It may be that there is a sign for you after all," says Bernadette immediately prior to revealing her [[spoiler:crippling leg tumour and tuberculosis of the bone]].

to:

* WhamLine: "It may be that there is a sign for you after all," says Bernadette immediately prior to revealing her [[spoiler:crippling leg tumour and tuberculosis of the bone]].bone]].
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: The music you hear is by Alfred Newman, but Igor Stravinsky had been the first choice. He had the music for the first apparition already planned before he even saw a screening of the film, and when Perlberg and King asked him to change some of it Stravinsky refused and was released from his contract. Now, put on his "Symphony in Three Movements," second movement, and cue up your DVD to where Bernadette, Marie and Jeanne are running over the hills to Massabielle. This is actually more evocative of a bizarre yet tenderly sacred mood than Newman's more traditionally religious approach.


A 1943 classic about the life of [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Soubirous Saint Bernadette Soubirous]], a shepherdess and later nun who saw eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, France when she was a teenager. Adapted from Franz Werfel's novel of the same name, the film is directed by Henry King and stars Creator/JenniferJones in an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward-winning turn as Bernadette. Also in the cast are Charles Bickford, William Eythe, Gladys Cooper, Creator/VincentPrice, Lee J. Cobb, Anne Revere, and Linda Darnell.

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A 1943 classic about the life of [[http://http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Soubirous Saint Bernadette Soubirous]], a shepherdess and later nun who saw eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, France when she was a teenager. Adapted from Franz Werfel's novel of the same name, the film is directed by Henry King and stars Creator/JenniferJones in an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward-winning turn as Bernadette. Also in the cast are Charles Bickford, William Eythe, Gladys Cooper, Creator/VincentPrice, Lee J. Cobb, Anne Revere, and Linda Darnell.


* WaifProphet: Bernadette is an IllGirl who has visions of "a beautiful lady." Bernie tells Antoine and his mother her what happened in the second apparition. It's clear the mother believes her but worries, "Things like that bode no good."

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* WaifProphet: Bernadette is an IllGirl who has visions of "a beautiful lady." Bernie tells Antoine and his mother how the lady spoke about making her what happened happy in "the next world" in the second apparition. It's clear the mother believes her but worries, "Things like that bode no good."


* ChildrenAreInnocent: Aunt Bernarde is one of the first to believe Bernadette, saying she's a "simple, honest child who hasn't the cunning" to invent such a thing.



* InvisibleToAdults: The lady, and to everyone else too, but Bernarde's speech strongly emphasizes this idea: "She sees this lady. No one else does. Who are you to say that she is wrong and you are right?"



* WaifProphet: Bernadette is an IllGirl who has visions of "a beautiful lady."

to:

* WaifProphet: Bernadette is an IllGirl who has visions of "a beautiful lady." Bernie tells Antoine and his mother her what happened in the second apparition. It's clear the mother believes her but worries, "Things like that bode no good."

Added DiffLines:

* LargeAndInCharge: Aunt Bernarde, having listened to Louise and Francois' excuses on why they just ''can't'' let Bernadette return to the grotto, gives them a brief, sensible NoSympathy QuitYourWhining speech. She believes Bernadette, and declares that the women in the family must stand by her and and accompany her every day. Blanche Yurka was almost six feet tall, and when she stands up at this moment the camera angles up to make her look even more impressive:
--> "I'll come -- and when I walk with her -- ''let anyone dare to laugh.''"


* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Prosecutor Vital Dutour gets one as he plays a vaguely sinister ObstructiveBureaucrat who is disdainful of religion while still maintaining it publicly. In real-life, he was a devout Catholic who didn't believe in Bernadette's visions (he believed she was hallucinating instead).

to:

* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Prosecutor Vital Dutour gets one as he plays a vaguely sinister (he is, after all, played by Creator/VincentPrice!) ObstructiveBureaucrat who is disdainful of religion while still maintaining it publicly. In real-life, he was a devout Catholic who didn't believe in Bernadette's visions (he believed she was hallucinating instead).

Added DiffLines:

--> '''Eugénie.''' You're an ATHEIST, Louis!!!
--> '''Louis.''' (calmly) That's the most stupid thing a sovereign could be.


* FlatEarthAtheist: A zig-zagged trope version as the skepticism of many individuals to the miracles is disapproved of by the film but mostly treated sympathetically with the exception of Vital Dutour the Imperial prosecutor. It is an accusation thrown at him, though, by his own wife no less.

to:

* FlatEarthAtheist: A zig-zagged trope version as the skepticism of many individuals to the miracles is disapproved of by the film but mostly treated sympathetically with the exception of Vital Dutour the Imperial prosecutor. It is an The Emperor Louis Napoleon gets this accusation thrown at him, though, by his own wife no less.



* WhatTheHellHero: Sister Vauzous gives Bernadette one at the tail end of the film about how she has never known real suffering, only for Bernadette to reveal that she has been living with the impossibly painful condition tuberculosis of the bone in her legs for years.
* WhamLine: "Maybe there is something I can do," says Bernadette immediately prior to revealing her [[spoiler:crippling leg tumour and tuberculosis of the bone]].

to:

* WhatTheHellHero: Sister Vauzous gives Bernadette one at the tail end of the film about how she has never known real suffering, suffering. She begs Bernadette for a "sign" that would prove her worthy of the visitations, only for Bernadette to reveal that she has been living with the impossibly painful condition tuberculosis of the bone in her legs for years.
years.
* WhamLine: "Maybe "It may be that there is something I can do," a sign for you after all," says Bernadette immediately prior to revealing her [[spoiler:crippling leg tumour and tuberculosis of the bone]].

Added DiffLines:

* DrivenByEnvy: Sister Vauzous is this, though she projects a lot. Effectively, she's upset despite having devoted her life to God that someone else was chosen to be the recipient of miracles. [[spoiler: She gets better.]]



* ArtisticLicenseHistory: Quite a few points like inventing a romance between Bernadette and her childhood friend Antoine (he was already married in real life and they were JustFriends). There is also the merging of a number of individuals, inventing new ones, and changing around motivations. Generally, the real life story amounts to "a devout Catholic village is skeptical of the fact it's a site of a genuine miracle before enthusiastically embracing this fact."
* BreakTheHaughty: Prosecutor Dutour goes through one of these as he's the most respected man in the village but goes through a HumiliationConga as the evidence of miracles continues to pile up. He also gets throat cancer in what is implied to be divine retribution (this did not happen in real life). He ends up on his knees, praying to Saint Bernadette for forgiveness.



* FlatEarthAtheist: A zig-zagged trope version as the skepticism of many individuals to the miracles is disapproved of by the film but mostly treated sympathetically with the exception of Vital Dutour the Imperial prosecutor. It is an accusation thrown at him, though, by his own wife no less.



* HeelRealization: Sister Vauzous, along with her MyGodWhatHaveIDone.

to:

* HeelRealization: Sister Vauzous, along with her MyGodWhatHaveIDone. Prosecutor Dutour has one of these as well.
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Prosecutor Vital Dutour gets one as he plays a vaguely sinister ObstructiveBureaucrat who is disdainful of religion while still maintaining it publicly. In real-life, he was a devout Catholic who didn't believe in Bernadette's visions (he believed she was hallucinating instead).


A 1943 classic about the life of [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Soubirous Saint Bernadette Soubirous]], a shepherdess and later nun who saw eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, France when she was a teenager. Adapted from Franz Werfel's novel of the same name, the film is directed by Henry King and stars Creator/JenniferJones in an AcademyAward-winning turn as Bernadette. Also in the cast are Charles Bickford, William Eythe, Gladys Cooper, Creator/VincentPrice, Lee J. Cobb, Anne Revere, and Linda Darnell.

to:

A 1943 classic about the life of [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Soubirous Saint Bernadette Soubirous]], a shepherdess and later nun who saw eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, France when she was a teenager. Adapted from Franz Werfel's novel of the same name, the film is directed by Henry King and stars Creator/JenniferJones in an AcademyAward-winning UsefulNotes/AcademyAward-winning turn as Bernadette. Also in the cast are Charles Bickford, William Eythe, Gladys Cooper, Creator/VincentPrice, Lee J. Cobb, Anne Revere, and Linda Darnell.


* BeamMeUpScotty: Bernadette never spoke the words in the trope quote: they were written by Franz Werfel for his book. In fact, Bernadette while a nun at Nevers did ask for water from the Lourdes Spring and drank it to cure a life-threatening attack of asthma. She never had another one.


A 1943 classic about the life of [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Soubirous Saint Bernadette Soubirous]], a shepherdess and later nun who saw eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes when she was a teenager. Adapted from Franz Werfel's novel of the same name, the film is directed by Henry King and stars Creator/JenniferJones in an AcademyAward-winning turn as Bernadette. Also in the cast are Charles Bickford, William Eythe, Gladys Cooper, Creator/VincentPrice, Lee J. Cobb, Anne Revere, and Linda Darnell.

to:

A 1943 classic about the life of [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Soubirous Saint Bernadette Soubirous]], a shepherdess and later nun who saw eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes Lourdes, France when she was a teenager. Adapted from Franz Werfel's novel of the same name, the film is directed by Henry King and stars Creator/JenniferJones in an AcademyAward-winning turn as Bernadette. Also in the cast are Charles Bickford, William Eythe, Gladys Cooper, Creator/VincentPrice, Lee J. Cobb, Anne Revere, and Linda Darnell.




to:

* BeamMeUpScotty: Bernadette never spoke the words in the trope quote: they were written by Franz Werfel for his book. In fact, Bernadette while a nun at Nevers did ask for water from the Lourdes Spring and drank it to cure a life-threatening attack of asthma. She never had another one.


From Website/IMDb: "In 1858 France, Bernadette, an adolescent peasant girl, has a vision of "" in the city dump. She never claims it to be anything other than this, but the townspeople all assume it to be the Virgin Mary. The pompous government officials think she is nuts, and do their best to suppress the girl and her followers, and the church wants nothing to do with the whole matter. But as Bernadette attracts wider and wider attention, the phenomenon overtakes everyone in the town, and transforms their lives."

to:

From Website/IMDb: "In 1858 France, Bernadette, an adolescent peasant girl, has a vision of "" "a beautiful lady" in the city dump. She never claims it to be anything other than this, but the townspeople all assume it to be the Virgin Mary. The pompous government officials think she is nuts, and do their best to suppress the girl and her followers, and the church wants nothing to do with the whole matter. But as Bernadette attracts wider and wider attention, the phenomenon overtakes everyone in the town, and transforms their lives."

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