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History Film / TheBridgeAtRemagen

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* ChildSoldiers. Rudi, and "Just Plain Tragic" type. Very much TruthInTelevision.

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* NotSoAboveItAll: Hartman, after sneering at Angelo’s looting, stops to pick up Krueger’s dropped gold cigarette case.


Directed by John Guillermin, the film stars George Segal, Creator/RobertVaughn, Ben Gazzara, Bradford Dillman, and E. G. Marshall. The screenplay was heavily influenced by historian Ken Hechler's 1957 narrative account of the same name, with characters heavily fictionalized.

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Directed by John Guillermin, the film stars George Segal, Creator/GeorgeSegal, Creator/RobertVaughn, Ben Gazzara, Bradford Dillman, and E. G. Marshall. The screenplay was heavily influenced by historian Ken Hechler's 1957 narrative account of the same name, with characters heavily fictionalized.


Released in a crowded field of war films in the late 1960s, the movie was a staple of late-night TV bit received little real acclaim. The production was notable for having to displace partway through due to the Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia.

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Released in a crowded field of war films in the late 1960s, the movie was a staple of late-night TV bit but received little real acclaim. The production was notable for having to displace partway through due to the Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia. \n

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* AntiVillain: Major Kreuger may be the German officer trying to defend and if necessary destroy the titular bridge, but he is never shown to be anything but a good man. He reassures the men under his command that reinforcements are on their way, isn't afraid to be near the action and tries to get the job done despite empty promises and inadequate support from the Wehrmacht.

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* CoolGuns: Sergeant Angelo carries a German MP40 throughout the movie, probably also as a character establishing trait.


Directed by John Guillermin, the film stars George Segal, Robert Vaughn, Ben Gazzara, Bradford Dillman, and E. G. Marshall. The screenplay was heavily influenced by historian Ken Hechler's 1957 narrative account of the same name, with characters heavily fictionalized.

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Directed by John Guillermin, the film stars George Segal, Robert Vaughn, Creator/RobertVaughn, Ben Gazzara, Bradford Dillman, and E. G. Marshall. The screenplay was heavily influenced by historian Ken Hechler's 1957 narrative account of the same name, with characters heavily fictionalized.

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The screenplay was heavily influenced by Ken Hechler's book of the same name, with characters heavily fictionalized.

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Directed by John Guillermin, the film stars George Segal, Robert Vaughn, Ben Gazzara, Bradford Dillman, and E. G. Marshall. The screenplay was heavily influenced by historian Ken Hechler's book 1957 narrative account of the same name, with characters heavily fictionalized.


A 1968 historical action film based on a true UsefulNotes/WorldWarII story. The film is a fictionalized telling of the capture of the last standing bridge over the Rhine River in March 1945.

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A 1968 1969 historical action film based on a true UsefulNotes/WorldWarII story. The film is a fictionalized telling of the capture of the last standing bridge over the Rhine River in March 1945.


A 1968 historical action film based on a true WorldWarII story. The film is a fictionalized telling of the capture of the last standing bridge over the Rhine River in March 1945.

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A 1968 historical action film based on a true WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII story. The film is a fictionalized telling of the capture of the last standing bridge over the Rhine River in March 1945.



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* WheresTheKaboom: The perfect example of this trope. German engineers try desperately though much of the movie to destroy the bridge. [[spoiler: when they do finally receive the explosives, plant them, and light the secondary fuze after sabotage and shellfire prevent the main charge from being detonated, the resulting explosion fails to bring the bridge down.]]

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* HighlyConspicuousUniform: the German officers all wear their high peaked forage caps with bright silver cap cords into battle. In actuality, it would have been more common to wear steel helmets or smaller caps without the cap cords.

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* ArtisticLicenseHistory: aspects of the film are fictionalized, probably to add additional characterization possibilities and better permit the more cynical view of the producers to come through.
** The first officer across the bridge was actually Lieutenant Karl Timmermann. He was a German-American officer with a playful side (in the book, it's mentioned he pot-shotted at German power transformers while riding in his jeep) and respect for authority. Lieutenant Hartman in the film is tired and unenthusiastic about the war.
** The first soldier to cross the real bridge was Sergeant Alex Drabik. There is no evidence in the book that he was anything like the fictional Sergeant Angelo, who carried a German weapon, robbed the dead, questioned orders and assaulted his battalion commander.
** Other major details are TruthInTelevision; the Germans really did [[spoiler: try to blow up the bridge and fail]], and really did [[spoiler: execute the major in command of the bridge after it was captured.]]

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* DeathFromAbove: An American air raid on the bridge has terrifying effects on the civilians still trying to use it. Also used to set up the scenes in the nearby Gasthaus.


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** The American airplanes in the air raid, on the other hand, are obvious footage of early war model B-25s in "Doolittle Raid" markings.

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