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** The Grissom is named after Gus Grissom, one of the astronauts who died in the Apollo I accident in 1967.

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** The Grissom is named after Gus Grissom, UsefulNotes/GusGrissom, one of the astronauts who died in the Apollo I accident in 1967.

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* RepayingForTheNeedsOfTheOne: This movie is the partial namer for this trope. Kirk and Company sacrifice so much to bring Spock's body and mind back together, [[spoiler:including self-destructing the Enterprise, and David Marcus' death.]] As Kirk explains to Spock when he's whole again:
--->'''Kirk:''' ...Because the needs of the one... outweighed the needs of the many.


* WorfHadTheFlu: The jury-rigged ''Enterprise'' is still badly damaged after the last film, and Scotty didn't anticipate being in a combat situation, thus the ship is disabled by Kruge's bird-of-prey after its circuits overload. Kruge is surprised when he wins, since the ''Enterprise'' outguns him ten-to-one.

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* WorfHadTheFlu: The jury-rigged ''Enterprise'' is still badly damaged after the last film, only running on a skeleton crew, and Scotty didn't anticipate being in a combat situation, thus the ship is disabled by Kruge's bird-of-prey after its circuits overload. Kruge is surprised when he wins, since the ''Enterprise'' outguns him ten-to-one.


* SeriesContinuityError: In an early episode of ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'', Spock tells Uhura "Vulcan has no moon" in response to her flirting. However, ''Star Trek III'' shows a massive "moon" in the Vulcan sky. {{Justified|Trope}} in that it's so big, in fact, that [[FridgeBrilliance Vulcan does not technically have a moon;]] Vulcan is a binary planet. [[ExactWords This specificity]] is quite within [[LiteralMinded Vulcan character.]]

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* SeriesContinuityError: SeriesContinuityError:
**
In an early episode of ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'', Spock tells Uhura "Vulcan has no moon" in response to her flirting. However, ''Star Trek III'' shows a massive "moon" in the Vulcan sky. {{Justified|Trope}} in that it's so big, in fact, that [[FridgeBrilliance Vulcan does not technically have a moon;]] Vulcan is a binary planet. [[ExactWords This specificity]] is quite within [[LiteralMinded Vulcan character.]]]]
** Admiral Morrow mentions that the ''Enterprise'' is 20 years old as justification for its decommissioning. This is more of an out-and-out error in retrospect, with later entries in the franchise putting the ship's age at nearer 45 years at the time of its destruction. However, Morrow's figure is still incongruous with the bits and pieces of the ship's age that have been implied until this point[[note]](Spock having served under Pike for over a decade, followed by at least one, probably two five-year missions under Kirk either side of an 18-month refit, followed by several years as an Academy training vessel. And that's assuming that, as most people did at the time, you file ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'' under CanonDiscontinuity; if you include that series, there's Robert April's captaincy to consider as well)[[/note]], which put the age of the ''Enterprise'' much nearer 30 years than 20.


** After Kruge executes a mook [[YouHaveFailedMe for failing him]], his first officer asks for his attention while he's still in full bloodlust mode.

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** After Kruge executes a mook [[YouHaveFailedMe for failing him]], his first second officer asks for his attention while he's still in full bloodlust mode.


** This film: Spock asks his after being brought back to life, unaware initially that the ''Enterprise'' was destroyed in a gambit against the Klingons. In a way, the answer is yes, as self-destructing the ship prevented it from falling into enemy hands which would've been a far worse fate for it and the Federation.

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** This film: Spock asks his this again after being brought back to life, unaware initially that the ''Enterprise'' was destroyed in a gambit against the Klingons. In a way, the answer is yes, as self-destructing the ship prevented it from falling into enemy hands which would've been a far worse fate for it and the Federation.


* TakingYouWithMe: Not only does Kruge refuse, he grabs Kirk's ankle and earns himself a boot to the face.

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* TakingYouWithMe: TakingYouWithMe:
** The ''Enterprise'' self-destructs on its senior officers' command (don't worry, they beam away from the ship), killing a bunch of Klingons that tried to capture said officers.
**
Not only does Kruge refuse, he grabs Kirk's ankle and earns himself a boot to the face.

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* IronicEcho: "Ship, out of danger?":
** ''The Wrath of Khan'': Spock asks this with his dying breath to Kirk, having just done a repair job that exposed him to lethal amounts of radiation in order to save the ''Enterprise'' and all of its crew.
** This film: Spock asks his after being brought back to life, unaware initially that the ''Enterprise'' was destroyed in a gambit against the Klingons. In a way, the answer is yes, as self-destructing the ship prevented it from falling into enemy hands which would've been a far worse fate for it and the Federation.

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* LargeHam: Christopher Lloyd in full ChewingTheScenery mode. So much so that Dom Irrera in his standup act thought that Lloyd was doing his other famous role: "Kirk, you don't want to give me the Genesis device? ''[[Series/{{Taxi}} Hokey-doke!]]''"


** Kruge's Bird of Prey has more in common style-wise with a Romulan ship (bird-like) versus a Klingon ship (boxy and utilitarian). As a way to use PropRecycling in the original series an episode suggested a brief Klingon–Romulan treaty where they shared technology and ship designs; it allowed them to represent the Romulans by using a (previously made) Klingon D-7 cruiser. This brief alliance (the two factions are later very antagonistic to each other) is also the source of Klingon cloaking technology and the Bird of Prey ship design first seen in this movie. Incidentally, that ship style became far more recognizable as a Klingon vessel later in the franchise.

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** Kruge's Bird of Prey has more in common style-wise with a Romulan ship (bird-like) versus a Klingon ship (boxy and utilitarian). As a way to use PropRecycling [[invoked]]PropRecycling in the original series an episode suggested a brief Klingon–Romulan treaty where they shared technology and ship designs; it allowed them to represent the Romulans by using a (previously made) Klingon D-7 cruiser. This brief alliance (the two factions are later very antagonistic to each other) is also the source of Klingon cloaking technology and the Bird of Prey ship design first seen in this movie. Incidentally, that ship style became far more recognizable as a Klingon vessel later in the franchise.


[[TheOneWith The one where]] the CoolStarship ''Enterprise'' is destroyed.

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[[TheOneWith The one where]] the original CoolStarship ''Enterprise'' is destroyed.
KilledOffForReal.


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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_stiii.png]]

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.[[quoteright:275:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_stiii.png]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/45c6817e_00bf_4a48_af13_6a9f943274b9.png]]


* ComicBookAdaptation: Creator/DCComics adapted the film, though fans would have to wait until the 2010s for the first part of the trilogy (''Wrath of Khan'') to be made into a comic book.

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* ComicBookAdaptation: Creator/DCComics adapted the film, though fans would have to wait until the 2010s for the first part of the trilogy (''Wrath of Khan'') to be made into a comic book.[[labelnote:Explanation]]Creator/MarvelComics first had the license to the franchise when ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'' was released, but the last issue was released four months before ''Khan'' debuted. DC picked it up in 1984, just before ''Search'' debuted.[[/labelnote]]


* BilingualDialogue: Upon his detection of [=McCoy=]'s life signs in Spock's quarters, Chekov exclaims, "I'm not crazy!" in Russian ("Я не сумасшедший!").



** Kirk's "how many fingers am I holding up" comment to McCoy while making a Vulcan Salute could be seen as one to "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E10JourneyToBabel Journey to Babel]]", in which McCoy has trouble making one.

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** Kirk's "how many fingers am I holding up" comment to McCoy [=McCoy=] while making a Vulcan Salute could be seen as one to "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E10JourneyToBabel Journey to Babel]]", in which McCoy which[= McCoy=] has trouble making one.

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