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* BalefulPolymorph: Taken literally, "Doll on a Music Box" claims that the doll (actually Truly in disguise) was once human and cursed to become a mechanical object of amusement. [[RuleOfSymbolism However, it can also refer to Truly feeling restricted by the position and expectations associated with her social stature.]]

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* BalefulPolymorph: Taken literally, "Doll on a Music Box" claims that the doll (actually Truly in disguise) was once human and cursed to become a mechanical object of amusement.amusement, and that only [[TrueLovesKiss love's first kiss]] can break the spell. [[RuleOfSymbolism However, it can also refer to Truly feeling restricted by the position and expectations associated with her social stature.]]


The book it's based on was written by Creator/IanFleming. [[Literature/JamesBond Yes, THAT Ian Fleming]]. The movie itself was produced by Albert Broccoli [[Film/JamesBond of the same fame]]. Creator/GertFrobe, who played the Baron, also played [[RuleOfThree Auric]] Film/{{Goldfinger}}. Creator/DesmondLlewelyn played Coggins. Creator/BennyHill was the Toymaker. Oh, and the screenwriter was Creator/RoaldDahl (who, to continue the ''Bond'' allusions, wrote the screenplay to ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice''). Seriously, you can't make this stuff up.

Received a ScreenToStageAdaptation in 2002.

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The book it's based on was written by Creator/IanFleming. [[Literature/JamesBond Yes, THAT Ian Fleming]]. The movie itself was produced by Albert Broccoli Creator/AlbertRBroccoli, [[Film/JamesBond of the same fame]]. Creator/GertFrobe, who played the Baron, also played [[RuleOfThree Auric]] Film/{{Goldfinger}}. Creator/DesmondLlewelyn played Coggins. Creator/BennyHill was the Toymaker. Oh, and the screenwriter was Creator/RoaldDahl (who, to continue the ''Bond'' allusions, wrote the screenplay to ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice''). Seriously, you can't make this stuff up.

Received Creator/BarbaraBroccoli produced a ScreenToStageAdaptation in 2002.
2002.

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* DarkReprise: "Hushabye Mountain", the gentle lullaby sung by Potts to his children early in the film, is reprised later as he tries to reassure the captive Vulgarian children, only to remind himself in doing so that his ''own'' children are still missing. Potts is so overcome with emotion that he stops, only for Truly to take up the song in his place.


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* ParentalLoveSong: "We Three".


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* PatterSong: "Me Ol' Bamboo"


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* SidekickSong: "Posh!" for Grandpa Potts.


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* VillainSong: In addition to the above-mentioned "Chu-Chi Face", the stage version adds "The Bombie Samba".


* AdaptationExpansion: While the original film relegates the Vulgarian subplot to [[AllJustADream a story Potts tells his children while they're at the seaside]], it gets expanded in the stage version; Vulgaria and all its denizens (evil or otherwise) are real, and they're introduced at the beginning of the show, as opposed to roughly halfway through.
* AltoVillainess: Baroness Bomburst.



* CounterpointDuet: "Doll on a Music Box" and "Truly Scrumptious (reprise)" at Baron Bomburst's birthday party.
* CurbStompBattle: The Vulgarian Army is ''very'' easily taken down by the escaped children.

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* CounterpointDuet: "Doll on a Music Box" and "Truly Box/Truly Scrumptious (reprise)" at Baron Bomburst's birthday party.
** Exclusive to the stage version, "Act English".
* CurbStompBattle: The Vulgarian Army is ''very'' easily taken down by the escaped children.children, including the infamous Child Catcher.


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* ElevenOClockNumber: "Doll On a Music Box", for the film.
** "Teamwork", exclusive to the stage version, is a near-perfect example of this trope aside from the fact that it's followed up by another two numbers before the climax (including the aforementioned number from the film).


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* LadyMacbeth: The Baroness takes on this role in the stage adaptation (unlike in the film, where she comes across as more airheaded and is less actively antagonistic). It is she who orders the Vulgarian spies to bring the car to Vulgaria, albeit all to please her darling husband.


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* SetSwitchSong: "Hushabye Mountain", in the stage version, which transitions almost immediately into the funfair.


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** It's played straight in the ScreenToStageAdaptation, where they Baron and Baroness's relationship is rewritten so that their love for one another is entirely mutual.


* The big guy whose nerves Caractacus gets on [[EstablishingCharacterMoment is seen winning at one of these.]]

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* TestYourStrengthGame: The big guy whose nerves Caractacus gets on [[EstablishingCharacterMoment is seen winning at one of these.]]

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* The big guy whose nerves Caractacus gets on [[EstablishingCharacterMoment is seen winning at one of these.]]


* TeenWasteland: Vulgaria has outlawed children of all ages, forcing the townspeople to hide them in a ghetto. Some of these exiled children are teenagers, who mostly look after the infants.

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* TeenWasteland: TeenageWasteland: Vulgaria has outlawed children of all ages, forcing the townspeople to hide them in a ghetto. Some of these exiled children are teenagers, who mostly look after the infants.

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* TeenWasteland: Vulgaria has outlawed children of all ages, forcing the townspeople to hide them in a ghetto. Some of these exiled children are teenagers, who mostly look after the infants.

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* HowTheMightyHaveFallen: Chitty's backstory; she was once a prestigious racing car but a rather unfortunate incident in her final race involving a young girl and her runaway dog led to the car's untimely destruction as it veered to avoid a collision. It would sit in Mister Coggins' shop until it was bought and fully restored by Caractacus.

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* SameLanguageDub: Like his previous role in ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}'', because of his thick German accent, Creator/GertFrobe's dialogue as the baron was looped in post, only this time by Roger C. Carmel.


* MeanCharacterNiceActor: Believe it or not, Robert Helpmann, who played the terrifying Child Catcher, was extremely kind, especially towards the children.

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* OneBookAuthor: This was child actress Heather Ripley's only feature film.

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* KidsPlayMatchmaker: Mr. Potts' kids try to match him up with Lady Truly, doing so pretty unsubtly by ending his story to them with "then Daddie and Truly got married! Yeah!"


* CreatorThumbprint: Roald Dahl's hand in adapting the story is rather clear, with such aspects as not one, but two new ChildHater antagonists, one of whom is directly involved in harming them, and conversely, two adults who really care about children, and dark comedy like a couple singing a loving duet while one tries to kill the other.

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* CreatorThumbprint: Roald Dahl's hand in adapting the story is rather clear, with such aspects as not one, but two new ChildHater antagonists, one of whom is directly involved in harming them, and conversely, two adults who really care about children, and dark comedy like a couple singing a loving duet while one tries to kill the other. There's also the fact that Truly's father is a confectionery manufacturer, owing to Dahl's love of sweets.


* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: The episode of the two spies dressed as "English gentlemen" ''may'' be based on a UsefulNotes/WorldWarII story in which two German spies were apprehended in the fen-country of Norfolk because (having been misled by Creator/PGWodehouse and other similar English authors) they had attempted to pass as Englishmen by wearing spats and top-hats, both unsuitable to the terrain and hopelessly out of fashion by the 1940s. Caractacus is reputed to be partially based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_M._Leland Henry M. Leland]].

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* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: The episode of the two spies dressed as "English gentlemen" ''may'' be based on a UsefulNotes/WorldWarII story in which two German spies were apprehended in the fen-country of Norfolk because (having been misled by Creator/PGWodehouse and other similar English authors) they had attempted to pass as Englishmen by wearing spats and top-hats, both unsuitable to the terrain and hopelessly out of fashion by the 1940s. Caractacus is reputed to be partially based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_M._Leland Henry M. Leland]].Leland.]]

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