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* ForWantOfANail: This story diverges from the original series when Laurence is sent away early in ''His Majesty's Dragon'' to allow someone raised in the Aerial Corps to attempt to harness Temeraire. Rather than remaining in the pasture as he did in the books and forcing someone to go fetch Laurence in the middle of dinner with his Navy friends, Temeraire flies off to search for Laurence and finds him openly re-accepting his post in the Navy after having come to accept the loss of Temeraire over dinner. Temeraire becomes fully convinced that Laurence never wanted him in the first place and reluctantly accepts Dayes as captain. Laurence goes to bed on the ''Reliant'' for the night, only to realize the next morning that he's made a horrible mistake about twelve hours too late and is unable to take Temeraire back.

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* ForWantOfANail: This story diverges from the original series when Laurence is sent away early in ''His Majesty's Dragon'' to allow someone raised in the Aerial Corps to attempt to harness Temeraire. Rather than remaining in the pasture as he did in the books and forcing someone to go fetch Laurence in the middle of dinner with his Navy friends, Temeraire flies off to search for Laurence and finds doesn't find him openly re-accepting his post in the Navy until after having dinner, over which he's come to accept the loss of Temeraire over dinner.his dragon and openly re-accepted his post in the Navy. Temeraire becomes fully convinced that Laurence never wanted him in the first place and reluctantly accepts Dayes as captain. Laurence goes to bed on the ''Reliant'' for the night, only to realize the next morning that he's made a horrible mistake about twelve hours too late and is unable to take Temeraire back.


* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a piss-poor captain who snaps at his crew, including his little cadet [[TheSquadette Roland]]. It's very hard to ever feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches Dayes out in his very first appearance in Chapter 1 and later captures him.

to:

* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a piss-poor captain who snaps at his crew, including his little cadet eleven-year-old ensign [[TheSquadette Roland]]. It's very hard to ever feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches Dayes out in his very first appearance in Chapter 1 and later captures him.


* AffablyEvil: Laurence comes to be known as the "Gentleman Pirate", thanks to his respectable clothes and rumors that he's the son of some noble. He's also unfailingly polite at all times, even when he calmly slits a slaver's throat- the same slaver from ''Empire of Ivory'' who would have gone on to sue Laurence for £10,000 in canon for cutting his slaves loose -which serves only to make him all the more terrifying. Although precisely how ''evil'' this makes him is debatable, considering his targets are ''slavers''.

to:

* AffablyEvil: Laurence comes to be known as the "Gentleman Pirate", thanks to his respectable clothes and rumors that he's the son of some noble. He's also unfailingly polite at all times, even when he calmly slits a slaver's throat- the same slaver from ''Empire of Ivory'' who would have gone on to sue Laurence for £10,000 in canon for cutting his slaves loose -which serves only to make him all the more terrifying. Although precisely how ''evil'' "evil" this makes him is debatable, considering his targets are ''slavers''.



* EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas: After Laurence disgraces himself with the Tswana, he goes to bed unhappy and distressed, dreaming of his mother and being carried in her arms when he was a little boy, who he was certain he would never see again.

to:

* EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas: After Laurence disgraces himself with the Tswana, he goes takes to his bed unhappy and distressed, dreaming of his mother and being carried in her arms when he was a little boy, who he was certain he would never see again.



* GreyAndGrayMorality: The aviators are likeable enough as individuals (well, except Dayes), but are acting to prop up a colonialist power and, more directly, the Atlantic slave trade. Laurence might be ruthless, but he's ruthless in the cause of destroying said slave-trade, and has a great many admirable personal qualities.
* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a poor captain to the intelligent Temeraire. It's very hard to feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches Dayes out in his very first appearance in Chapter 1 and later captures him.

to:

* GreyAndGrayMorality: The aviators are likeable enough as individuals (well, except Dayes), [[HateSink Dayes]]), but are acting to prop up a colonialist power and, more directly, the Atlantic slave trade. Laurence might be ruthless, but he's ruthless in the cause of destroying said slave-trade, and has a great many admirable personal qualities.
* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a poor piss-poor captain to the intelligent Temeraire. who snaps at his crew, including his little cadet [[TheSquadette Roland]]. It's very hard to ever feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches Dayes out in his very first appearance in Chapter 1 and later captures him.



* StartOfDarkness: Prior to the start of the story, Laurence was just as he was in canon- an honorable naval captain with a strong moral compass in the service of king and country. But the loss of Temeraire and nearly being brought to partake in penal slavery, and being mutinied against over it, are what turn him over to fighting the slave trade through piracy.

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* StartOfDarkness: Prior to the start of the story, Laurence was just as he was in canon- an honorable naval captain with a strong moral compass in the service of king and country.country, who captured and wound up harnessing a dragon. But the loss of Temeraire and nearly being brought to partake in penal slavery, and being mutinied against over it, are what turn him over to fighting the slave trade through piracy.



* VillainProtagonist: Out of all of the characters, Laurence by far gets the most focus and is treated by the narrative as its protagonist, in light of all of the significant changes to his worldview and lot, while Temeraire and Granby wind up becoming deuteragonists.

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* VillainProtagonist: Out of all of the characters, Laurence by far gets the most focus and is treated by the narrative as its protagonist, in light of all of the significant changes to his worldview and lot, while Temeraire and Granby wind up becoming become narrators as deuteragonists.


* NecessarilyEvil: Laurence is fully aware that his violent methods of capturing ships, burning ports, and destroying livelihoods that benefit from the slave trade are not nice in the least, yet he continues because he feels he has nothing left to offer. There may also be some near-YourAreWhatYouHate-type sentiments in there, considering that he was nearly compelled to take part in penal slavery himself and was almost killed for trying to avoid it.

to:

* NecessarilyEvil: Laurence is fully aware that his violent methods of capturing ships, burning ports, and destroying livelihoods that benefit from the slave trade are not nice in the least, yet he continues because he feels he has nothing left to offer. There may also be some near-YourAreWhatYouHate-type near-YouAreWhatYouHate-type sentiments in there, considering that he was nearly compelled to take part in penal slavery himself and was almost killed for trying to avoid it.


* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a poor captain to the intelligent Temeraire. It's very hard to feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches him out as early as the very first chapter and later captures him.

to:

* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a poor captain to the intelligent Temeraire. It's very hard to feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches him Dayes out as early as the in his very first chapter appearance in Chapter 1 and later captures him.


* AffablyEvil: Laurence comes to be known as the "Gentleman Pirate", thanks to his respectable clothes and rumors that he's the son of some noble. He's also unfailingly polite at all times, even when he calmly slits a slaver's throat- the same slaver from ''Empire of Ivory'' who would have gone on to sue Laurence for £10,000 in canon for cutting his slaves loose -which serves only to make him all the more terrifying. Although precisely how ''evil'' this makes him is debateable.
** Although it is debateable just how 'evil' Laurence actually is, considering his main targets are ''slavers''.

to:

* AffablyEvil: Laurence comes to be known as the "Gentleman Pirate", thanks to his respectable clothes and rumors that he's the son of some noble. He's also unfailingly polite at all times, even when he calmly slits a slaver's throat- the same slaver from ''Empire of Ivory'' who would have gone on to sue Laurence for £10,000 in canon for cutting his slaves loose -which serves only to make him all the more terrifying. Although precisely how ''evil'' this makes him is debateable.
** Although it is debateable just how 'evil' Laurence actually is,
debatable, considering his main targets are ''slavers''.



* HeroAntagonist: The aviators and others who oppose Laurence and his black fleet just want to protect England, and that includes enabling the currently-legal and quite valuable slave trade to continue without him stealing their ships, cutting their slaves loose, and burning slave ports.
** Although how 'heroic' this makes them is deconstructed in later chapters, as Temeraire and Granby are forced to confront the horrors of the slave trade that they have been complicit in by doing so.

to:

* HeroAntagonist: The aviators and others who oppose Laurence and his black fleet just want to protect England, and that includes enabling the currently-legal and quite valuable slave trade to continue without him stealing their ships, cutting their slaves loose, and burning slave ports.
**
ports. Although how 'heroic' this makes them is deconstructed in later chapters, as Temeraire and Granby are forced to confront the horrors of the slave trade that they have been complicit in by doing so.


* AntiHero / AntiVillain: Ultimately, Laurence aims to free as many slaves as he can by capturing slaving ships and attacking slave ports. By Chapter 3, he winds up joining forces with the Tswana, after finding that many of the slaves he's been rescuing originate from their kingdom. Deplorable as the trade may be to us modern readers, it still supports a lot of livelihoods and all of the labor from the trade results in unprecedented agricultural productivity that drives the First Industrial Revolution. This contrast is underscored when Laurence slits a slaver's throat without remorse, prompting Granby's horrified reaction and remark that Laurence just killed a man in cold blood.

to:

* AntiHero / AntiVillain: Ultimately, Laurence aims to free as many slaves as he can by capturing slaving ships and attacking slave ports. By Chapter 3, he winds up joining forces with the Tswana, after finding that many of the slaves he's been rescuing originate from their kingdom. Deplorable as the trade may be to us modern readers, it still supports a lot of livelihoods and all of the labor from the trade results in unprecedented agricultural productivity that drives the First Industrial Revolution. This contrast is underscored when Laurence slits a slaver's throat without remorse, prompting Granby's horrified reaction and remark that Laurence just killed a man in cold blood.


Added DiffLines:

* HateSink: Dayes does pretty much nothing but be a sullen {{Jerkass}} and a poor captain to the intelligent Temeraire. It's very hard to feel any sympathy for him when Laurence punches him out as early as the very first chapter and later captures him.


Added DiffLines:

* NecessarilyEvil: Laurence is fully aware that his violent methods of capturing ships, burning ports, and destroying livelihoods that benefit from the slave trade are not nice in the least, yet he continues because he feels he has nothing left to offer. There may also be some near-YourAreWhatYouHate-type sentiments in there, considering that he was nearly compelled to take part in penal slavery himself and was almost killed for trying to avoid it.

Added DiffLines:

* GreyAndGrayMorality: The aviators are likeable enough as individuals (well, except Dayes), but are acting to prop up a colonialist power and, more directly, the Atlantic slave trade. Laurence might be ruthless, but he's ruthless in the cause of destroying said slave-trade, and has a great many admirable personal qualities.


Added DiffLines:

* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: Predictably, this is what got Laurence disgraced and led to him beginning his career as a pirate captain, after his crew mutinied at his fair treatment of prisoners. In a larger sense, this could describe Laurence's entire piratical career.

Added DiffLines:

** Although how 'heroic' this makes them is deconstructed in later chapters, as Temeraire and Granby are forced to confront the horrors of the slave trade that they have been complicit in by doing so.


* AffablyEvil: Laurence comes to be known as the "Gentleman Pirate", thanks to his respectable clothes and rumors that he's the son of some noble. He's also unfailingly polite at all times, even when he calmly slits a slaver's throat- the same slaver from ''Empire of Ivory'' who would have gone on to sue Laurence for £10,000 in canon for cutting his slaves loose -which serves only to make him all the more terrifying.

to:

* AffablyEvil: Laurence comes to be known as the "Gentleman Pirate", thanks to his respectable clothes and rumors that he's the son of some noble. He's also unfailingly polite at all times, even when he calmly slits a slaver's throat- the same slaver from ''Empire of Ivory'' who would have gone on to sue Laurence for £10,000 in canon for cutting his slaves loose -which serves only to make him all the more terrifying. Although precisely how ''evil'' this makes him is debateable.


* AssholeVictim: Basically all of Laurence's targets, given that they are ''slavers''.



* CulturedBadass: As befitting a man known as the Gentleman Pirate, Laurence still does his best to dress respectably, down to wearing a neckcloth and coat at all times, and maintains the polite manner of speech befitting his noble birth. All while ruthlessly plundering and trying to destroy the Atlantic slave trade.



* WickedCultured: As befitting a man known as the Gentleman Pirate, Laurence still does his best to dress respectably, down to wearing a neckcloth and coat at all times, and maintains the polite manner of speech befitting his noble birth. All while ruthlessly plundering and trying to destroy the Atlantic slave trade.

to:

* WickedCultured: As befitting a man known as the Gentleman Pirate, Laurence still does his best to dress respectably, down to wearing a neckcloth and coat at all times, and maintains the polite manner of speech befitting his noble birth. All while ruthlessly plundering and trying to destroy the Atlantic slave trade.


* AntiHero/AntiVillain: Ultimately, Laurence aims to free as many slaves as he can by capturing slaving ships and attacking slave ports. By Chapter 3, he winds up joining forces with the Tswana, after finding that many of the slaves he's been rescuing originate from their kingdom. Deplorable as the trade may be to us modern readers, it still supports a lot of livelihoods and all of the labor from the trade results in unprecedented agricultural productivity that drives the First Industrial Revolution. This contrast is underscored when Laurence slits a slaver's throat without remorse, prompting Granby's horrified reaction and remark that Laurence just killed a man in cold blood.

to:

* AntiHero/AntiVillain: AntiHero / AntiVillain: Ultimately, Laurence aims to free as many slaves as he can by capturing slaving ships and attacking slave ports. By Chapter 3, he winds up joining forces with the Tswana, after finding that many of the slaves he's been rescuing originate from their kingdom. Deplorable as the trade may be to us modern readers, it still supports a lot of livelihoods and all of the labor from the trade results in unprecedented agricultural productivity that drives the First Industrial Revolution. This contrast is underscored when Laurence slits a slaver's throat without remorse, prompting Granby's horrified reaction and remark that Laurence just killed a man in cold blood.


** Although it is debateable just how 'evil' Laurence actually is, considering his main targets are ''slavers''.



* AntiVillain: Ultimately, Laurence aims to free as many slaves as he can by capturing slaving ships and attacking slave ports. By Chapter 3, he winds up joining forces with the Tswana, after finding that many of the slaves he's been rescuing originate from their kingdom. Deplorable as the trade may be to us modern readers, it still supports a lot of livelihoods and all of the labor from the trade results in unprecedented agricultural productivity that drives the First Industrial Revolution. This contrast is underscored when Laurence slits a slaver's throat without remorse, prompting Granby's horrified reaction and remark that Laurence just killed a man in cold blood.

to:

* AntiVillain: AntiHero/AntiVillain: Ultimately, Laurence aims to free as many slaves as he can by capturing slaving ships and attacking slave ports. By Chapter 3, he winds up joining forces with the Tswana, after finding that many of the slaves he's been rescuing originate from their kingdom. Deplorable as the trade may be to us modern readers, it still supports a lot of livelihoods and all of the labor from the trade results in unprecedented agricultural productivity that drives the First Industrial Revolution. This contrast is underscored when Laurence slits a slaver's throat without remorse, prompting Granby's horrified reaction and remark that Laurence just killed a man in cold blood.

Added DiffLines:

* AmazonBrigade: As Laurence's pirate crew attracts more and more women, he takes to sequestering them on a ship led by Mary Carver, one of the original prisoners and part of his inner circle. Carver with her ship, the ''Lioness'', becomes one of Laurence's fiercest and most eager fighters.


* HopeSpot: In Chapter 4, Temeraire rescues Laurence and his boarding crew from arrest, and carries them back to their ships, moving Laurence to tears at finally being with Temeraire again. The two spend a few moments on one of Laurence's captured dragon-transports just saying hello to each other again, and Laurence marvels at how the dragonet he had to untangle from a hammock has grown into this beautiful glossy beast. But... he believes that if Temeraire joins him, Temeraire will almost certainly be executed alongside him, or at the very least have his potential as an intellectual, heavy-combat dragon wasted. So he urges Temeraire to return to Dayes, unable to watch the dragon leave his ship.

to:

* HopeSpot: In Chapter 4, Temeraire rescues Laurence and his boarding crew from arrest, and carries them back to their ships, moving Laurence to tears at finally being with Temeraire again. The two spend a few moments on one of Laurence's captured dragon-transports just saying hello to each other again, and Laurence marvels at how the dragonet he had to untangle from a hammock has grown into this beautiful glossy beast. But... he believes that if Temeraire joins him, Temeraire will almost certainly be executed alongside him, or at the very least have his potential as an intellectual, heavy-combat dragon wasted. So he urges Temeraire to return to Dayes, unable to watch the dragon leave his ship. The author even apologized at the end of the chapter.

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