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|| ''VideoGame/BattleArenaToshinden'' (1995) || ''VideoGame/SoulEdge'' (1995) || Early 3D weapons-based fighting games. || Both were released in 1995; ''Toshinden'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation, ''Soul'' for arcades (and ported to Playstation the following year). Although not obvious at first, ''Toshinden'' actually takes place in the (then-) present, while ''Soul'' takes place in the 16th century. ''Toshinden'' also has a clear anime-based style while ''Soul'' went with more stylized realism (similar to its sibling series ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''). || ''Soul Edge'', without a doubt. ''Battle Arena Toshinden'' gained a lot of acclaim and sales at first, thanks to novel features like sidestepping, lots of promotion by Sony and being one of the only fighting games for the Playstation at launch. It became the official pack-in game with the Playstation for a while, was ported to {{PC}}, UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and UsefulNotes/GameBoy and had three sequels, the first of which even got an arcade release. Despite all this, the game was quickly forgotten. There were many internal issues regarding its development, as Takara screwed itself over by having the series developed by an umbrella of smaller developers who were severely underpaid, and that they focused more on merchandise than the actual game. As newer, better and more refined fighting games came out, the series became DeaderThanDisco. Among nostalgic early Playstation owners, the series has gotten a bit of a CultClassic status though. ''Soul Edge'', on the other hand, was very successful both in arcades and on the Playstation, and thanks to the [[EvenBetterSequel awesome]] sequel ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'', managed to keep the momentum going and has become one of the most popular and beloved fighting game series around. ||
|| ''VideoGame/SoulEdge'' (1995) || ''VideoGame/MaceTheDarkAge'' (1997) || Arcade weapons-based fighting games in a HistoricalFantasy setting revolving around a titular ArtifactOfDoom weapon. || East vs. West, ''[[Creator/BandaiNamcoEntertainment Namco]]'' vs. ''[[Creator/MidwayGames Midway]]'', Samurai vs. Knight (literally, in this case). To oversimplify: ''Soul Edge'' is ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'' with swords, ''Mace'' is ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' with swords. It's also worth noting that the home port of each game was released exclusively on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} respectively. || ''Soul Edge'' spawned a very successful franchise still going strong. ''Mace'' was largely overlooked and had no sequel. ||
|| ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' (1996) || ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' (2008) || Established fighting franchise [[IntercontinuityCrossover crossing over]] with established comic universe. Capcom achieved such success with this formula back in TheNineties. ||While Capcom lost the rights to make more games a few years back, they were finally able to convince Marvel to let them make ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3''. Midway's ''Mortal Kombat'' staff, on the other hand was bought by Creator/WarnerBros, DC's parent company, shortly after ''[=MKvsDCU=]'' came out. || No contest. ''Marvel vs. Capcom'', specifically ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'', has been a tournament staple for over a decade now and still sees more serious (and casual) play than [=MKvsDCU=] ever did. In fact, ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' on one side and ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'' on the other are seen as bigger and more comparable rivals to ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'' (though moreso the latter because of release time frames) in the competitive community than [=MKvsDCU=]. ||

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|| ''VideoGame/BattleArenaToshinden'' (1995) || ''VideoGame/SoulEdge'' ''[[VideoGame/SoulSeries Soul Edge]]'' (1995) || Early 3D weapons-based fighting games. || Both were released in 1995; ''Toshinden'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation, ''Soul'' for arcades (and ported to Playstation [=PlayStation=] the following year). year, [[MarketBasedTitle rebranded as]] ''Soul Blade'' for the North American and European markets due to trademark issues). Although not obvious at first, ''Toshinden'' actually takes place in the (then-) present, (then-)present, while ''Soul'' takes place in the 16th century. ''Toshinden'' also has a clear anime-based style while ''Soul'' went with more stylized realism (similar to its sibling series ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''). || ''Soul Edge'', without a doubt. ''Battle Arena Toshinden'' gained a lot of acclaim and sales at first, thanks to novel features like sidestepping, lots of promotion by Sony and being one of the only fighting games for the Playstation [=PlayStation=] at launch. It became the official pack-in game with the Playstation [=PlayStation=] for a while, was ported to {{PC}}, UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and UsefulNotes/GameBoy and had three sequels, the first of which even got an arcade release. Despite all this, the game was quickly forgotten. There were many internal issues regarding its development, as Takara screwed itself over by having the series developed by an umbrella of smaller developers who were severely underpaid, and that they focused more on merchandise than the actual game. As newer, better and more refined fighting games came out, the series became DeaderThanDisco. Among nostalgic early Playstation [=PlayStation=] owners, the series has gotten a bit of a CultClassic status status, though. ''Soul Edge'', on the other hand, was very successful both in arcades and on the Playstation, and [=PlayStation=], and, thanks to the [[EvenBetterSequel awesome]] [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] sequel ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'', ''Soulcalibur'', managed to keep the momentum going and has become one of the most popular and beloved fighting game series around. ||
|| ''VideoGame/SoulEdge'' ''[[VideoGame/SoulSeries Soul Edge]]'' (1995) || ''VideoGame/MaceTheDarkAge'' (1997) || Arcade weapons-based fighting games in a HistoricalFantasy setting revolving around a titular ArtifactOfDoom weapon. || East vs. West, ''[[Creator/BandaiNamcoEntertainment Namco]]'' vs. ''[[Creator/MidwayGames Midway]]'', Samurai vs. Knight (literally, in this case). To oversimplify: ''Soul Edge'' is ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'' with swords, ''Mace'' is ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' with swords. It's also worth noting that the home port of each game was released exclusively on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} respectively. || ''Soul Edge'' spawned a very successful franchise still going strong. ''Mace'' was largely overlooked and had no sequel. ||
|| ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' (1996) || ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' (2008) || Established fighting franchise [[IntercontinuityCrossover crossing over]] with established comic universe. Capcom achieved such success with this formula back in TheNineties. ||While Capcom lost the rights to make more games a few years back, they were finally able to convince Marvel to let them make ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3''. Midway's ''Mortal Kombat'' staff, on the other hand was bought by Creator/WarnerBros, DC's parent company, shortly after ''[=MKvsDCU=]'' came out. || No contest. ''Marvel vs. Capcom'', specifically ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'', has been a tournament staple for over a decade now and still sees more serious (and casual) play than [=MKvsDCU=] ''[=MKvsDCU=]'' ever did. In fact, ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' on one side and ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'' on the other are seen as bigger and more comparable rivals to ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'' (though moreso more so the latter because of release time frames) in the competitive community than [=MKvsDCU=].''[=MKvsDCU=]''. ||


|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||''Smash Bros. Ultimate''. ''While Smash Bros.''' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.

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|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||''Smash Bros. Ultimate''. ''While Smash Bros.''' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, eventually managing to sell over 13.8 million copies by April 2019 and become one of the highest selling fighting games ''of all time'', while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.figures in its launch week and despite a steady stream of DLC, has largely been forgotten by most people.


|| ''VideoGame/SlapCity'' (2018) || ''Icons: Combat Arena'' (2018) || PlatformFighter games developed by independent teams, intended to become a PC alternative for the Nintendo-exclusive VideoGame/SuperSmashBros series, while also appealing to its competetive scene. Both were also first released as Early Access. || ''VideoGame/SlapCity'', much like VideoGame/SuperSmashBros, is a MascotFighter featuring many of the developer's characters. ''Icons'', on the other hand, has its roster entirely composed of original characters. Notably, the latter's development team had people that previously worked on the famous GameMod ''VideoGame/ProjectM''|| ''Slap City'', no contest. Winning fans over with its fresh characters and creative game modes, remaining overwhelmingly praised since its release. ''Icons'', instead, got heavily criticized for aspects such as a roster mostly composed of expies of ''Smash'' fighters, matches being exclusively 1v1, and an abusive microtransaction system. Because of that, the game struggled with a shrinking playerbase, and its servers were put down on November 2018, rendering it unplayable since then.||

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|| ''VideoGame/SlapCity'' (2018) || ''Icons: Combat Arena'' (2018) || PlatformFighter games developed by independent teams, intended to become a PC alternative for the Nintendo-exclusive VideoGame/SuperSmashBros series, while also appealing to its competetive scene. Both were also first released as Early Access. || ''VideoGame/SlapCity'', much like VideoGame/SuperSmashBros, is a MascotFighter featuring many of the developer's characters. ''Icons'', on the other hand, has its roster entirely composed of original characters. Notably, the latter's development team had people that previously worked on the famous GameMod ''VideoGame/ProjectM''|| ''Slap City'', no contest. Winning fans over with its fresh characters and creative game modes, remaining it's remained overwhelmingly praised since its release. ''Icons'', instead, got heavily criticized for aspects such as a roster mostly composed of expies of ''Smash'' fighters, matches being exclusively 1v1, and an abusive microtransaction system. Because of that, the game struggled with a shrinking playerbase, and its servers were put down on November 2018, rendering it unplayable since then.||


|| ''VideoGame/SlapCity'' (2018) || ''Icons: Combat Arena'' (2018) || MascotFighter games developed by independent teams, intended to become a PC alternative for the Nintendo-exclusive VideoGame/SuperSmashBros series, while also appealing to its competetive scene. Both were also first released as Early Access. || ''VideoGame/SlapCity'', much like VideoGame/SuperSmashBros, is a MassiveMultiplayerCrossover of its developer's multiple games. ''Icons'', on the other hand, has its roster entirely composed of original characters. Notably, the latter's development team had people that previously worked on the famous GameMod ''VideoGame/ProjectM''|| ''Slap City'', no contest. Winning fans over with its fresh characters and creative game modes, remaining overwhelmingly praised since its release. ''Icons'', instead, got heavily criticized for aspects such as a roster mostly composed of expies of ''Smash'' fighters, matches being exclusively 1v1, and an abusive microtransaction system. Because of that, the game struggled with a shrinking playerbase, and its servers were put down on November 2018, rendering it unplayable since then.||

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|| ''VideoGame/SlapCity'' (2018) || ''Icons: Combat Arena'' (2018) || MascotFighter PlatformFighter games developed by independent teams, intended to become a PC alternative for the Nintendo-exclusive VideoGame/SuperSmashBros series, while also appealing to its competetive scene. Both were also first released as Early Access. || ''VideoGame/SlapCity'', much like VideoGame/SuperSmashBros, is a MassiveMultiplayerCrossover MascotFighter featuring many of its the developer's multiple games.characters. ''Icons'', on the other hand, has its roster entirely composed of original characters. Notably, the latter's development team had people that previously worked on the famous GameMod ''VideoGame/ProjectM''|| ''Slap City'', no contest. Winning fans over with its fresh characters and creative game modes, remaining overwhelmingly praised since its release. ''Icons'', instead, got heavily criticized for aspects such as a roster mostly composed of expies of ''Smash'' fighters, matches being exclusively 1v1, and an abusive microtransaction system. Because of that, the game struggled with a shrinking playerbase, and its servers were put down on November 2018, rendering it unplayable since then.||

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|| ''VideoGame/SlapCity'' (2018) || ''Icons: Combat Arena'' (2018) || MascotFighter games developed by independent teams, intended to become a PC alternative for the Nintendo-exclusive VideoGame/SuperSmashBros series, while also appealing to its competetive scene. Both were also first released as Early Access. || ''VideoGame/SlapCity'', much like VideoGame/SuperSmashBros, is a MassiveMultiplayerCrossover of its developer's multiple games. ''Icons'', on the other hand, has its roster entirely composed of original characters. Notably, the latter's development team had people that previously worked on the famous GameMod ''VideoGame/ProjectM''|| ''Slap City'', no contest. Winning fans over with its fresh characters and creative game modes, remaining overwhelmingly praised since its release. ''Icons'', instead, got heavily criticized for aspects such as a roster mostly composed of expies of ''Smash'' fighters, matches being exclusively 1v1, and an abusive microtransaction system. Because of that, the game struggled with a shrinking playerbase, and its servers were put down on November 2018, rendering it unplayable since then.||


|| ''VideoGame/BattleArenaToshinden'' (1995) || ''VideoGame/SoulEdge'' (1995) || Early 3D weapons-based fighting games. || Both were released in 1995; ''Toshinden'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation, ''Soul'' for arcades (and ported to Playstation the following year). Although not obvious at first, ''Toshinden'' actually takes place in the (then-) present, while ''Soul'' takes place in the 16th century. ''Toshinden'' also has a clear anime-based style while ''Soul'' went with more stylized realism (similar to its sibling series ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''). || ''Soul Edge'', without a doubt. ''Battle Arena Toshinden'' gained a lot of acclaim and sales at first, thanks to novel features like sidestepping, lots of promotion by Sony and being one of the only fighting games for the Playstation at launch. It became the official pack-in game with the Playstation for a while, was ported to {{PC}}, UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and GameBoy and had three sequels, the first of which even got an arcade release. Despite all this, the game was quickly forgotten. There were many internal issues regarding its development, as Takara screwed itself over by having the series developed by an umbrella of smaller developers who were severely underpaid, and that they focused more on merchandise than the actual game. As newer, better and more refined fighting games came out, the series became DeaderThanDisco. Among nostalgic early Playstation owners, the series has gotten a bit of a CultClassic status though. ''Soul Edge'', on the other hand, was very successful both in arcades and on the Playstation, and thanks to the [[EvenBetterSequel awesome]] sequel ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'', managed to keep the momentum going and has become one of the most popular and beloved fighting game series around. ||

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|| ''VideoGame/BattleArenaToshinden'' (1995) || ''VideoGame/SoulEdge'' (1995) || Early 3D weapons-based fighting games. || Both were released in 1995; ''Toshinden'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation, ''Soul'' for arcades (and ported to Playstation the following year). Although not obvious at first, ''Toshinden'' actually takes place in the (then-) present, while ''Soul'' takes place in the 16th century. ''Toshinden'' also has a clear anime-based style while ''Soul'' went with more stylized realism (similar to its sibling series ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''). || ''Soul Edge'', without a doubt. ''Battle Arena Toshinden'' gained a lot of acclaim and sales at first, thanks to novel features like sidestepping, lots of promotion by Sony and being one of the only fighting games for the Playstation at launch. It became the official pack-in game with the Playstation for a while, was ported to {{PC}}, UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and GameBoy UsefulNotes/GameBoy and had three sequels, the first of which even got an arcade release. Despite all this, the game was quickly forgotten. There were many internal issues regarding its development, as Takara screwed itself over by having the series developed by an umbrella of smaller developers who were severely underpaid, and that they focused more on merchandise than the actual game. As newer, better and more refined fighting games came out, the series became DeaderThanDisco. Among nostalgic early Playstation owners, the series has gotten a bit of a CultClassic status though. ''Soul Edge'', on the other hand, was very successful both in arcades and on the Playstation, and thanks to the [[EvenBetterSequel awesome]] sequel ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'', managed to keep the momentum going and has become one of the most popular and beloved fighting game series around. ||


|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s. || ||As of this writing, Granblue has not been released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.

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|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s. || ||As of this writing, Granblue ''Granblue'' has not been released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.


|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s. || ||As of this writing, neither game has released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.

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|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s. || ||As of this writing, neither game Granblue has not been released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.


|| ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcomInfinite'' (2017) || ''VideoGame/BlazblueCrossTagBattle'' (2018) || 2v2 tag-team tournament-competitive fighting games featuring ensemble casts of super-powered characters from multiple different properties || Coming onto the scene a month before EVO 2018 is due and with ''[=FighterZ=]'' is still hugely popular, ''BBTAG'' is the second Creator/ArcSystemWorks game to be competing with ''[=MvCI=]''. ''BBTAG'' is also a 2v2 crossover fighter featuring an ensemble cast from four popular anime franchises: ''Blazblue'', ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', ''VideoGame/UnderNightInBirth'' and the highly popular Creator/RoosterTeeth anime-styled web animation series ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''[[note]](''RWBY's'' [[Creator/MontyOum sadly now late creator]] and ''Blazblue'''s creator Toshimichi Mori were big fans of each others' work and the two planned for an eventual crossover, and here the four heroines of ''RWBY'' make their fighting game debut)[[/note]]. || The announcement that ''BBTAG'' would be present at Evo 2018 and ''MvCI'' would not when the former hadn't even been released came as a massive shock to the [=FGC=]. Though early hype for ''BBTAG'' was damaged by a controversy surrounding [=DLC=] practices, reception to early release builds and demos has been highly positive with players praising the new ''RWBY'' characters, the netcode and online play, the combat system (which is said to be very easy to pick up for new players but offers a surprising degree of depth to veterans due to character interplay) and the voice acting[[note]]with the casts of ''Blazblue'', ''Persona 4'' and ''RWBY'' reprising their roles and a slew of recognized anime and video game voice actors lending their talents to the ''[=UNIEL=]'' cast who have never before had English voices[[/note]]. In the end though, while both series underperformed, the fact that ''Cross Tag Battle'' got better reception a having a bit more sales than ''Infinite'' makes it the clear winner, even if it was an AcclaimedFlop.||

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|| ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcomInfinite'' (2017) || ''VideoGame/BlazblueCrossTagBattle'' (2018) || 2v2 tag-team tournament-competitive fighting games featuring ensemble casts of super-powered characters from multiple different properties || Coming onto the scene a month before EVO 2018 is due and with ''[=FighterZ=]'' is still hugely popular, ''BBTAG'' is the second Creator/ArcSystemWorks game to be competing with ''[=MvCI=]''. ''BBTAG'' is also a 2v2 crossover fighter featuring an ensemble cast from four popular anime franchises: ''Blazblue'', ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', ''VideoGame/UnderNightInBirth'' and the highly popular Creator/RoosterTeeth anime-styled web animation series ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''[[note]](''RWBY's'' [[Creator/MontyOum sadly now late creator]] and ''Blazblue'''s creator Toshimichi Mori were big fans of each others' work and the two planned for an eventual crossover, and here the four heroines of ''RWBY'' make their fighting game debut)[[/note]]. || The announcement that ''BBTAG'' would be present at Evo 2018 and ''MvCI'' ''[=MvCI=]'' would not when the former hadn't even been released came as a massive shock to the [=FGC=]. Though early hype for ''BBTAG'' was damaged by a controversy surrounding [=DLC=] practices, reception to early release builds and demos has been highly positive with players praising the new ''RWBY'' characters, the netcode and online play, the combat system (which is said to be very easy to pick up for new players but offers a surprising degree of depth to veterans due to character interplay) and the voice acting[[note]]with the casts of ''Blazblue'', ''Persona 4'' and ''RWBY'' reprising their roles and a slew of recognized anime and video game voice actors lending their talents to the ''[=UNIEL=]'' cast who have never before had English voices[[/note]]. In the end though, while both series underperformed, the fact that ''Cross Tag Battle'' got better reception a having a bit more sales than ''Infinite'' makes it the clear winner, even if it was an AcclaimedFlop.||



|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||''Smash Bros. Ultimate''. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.

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|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||''Smash Bros. Ultimate''. While ''While Smash Bros.' ''' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.


|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||Smash Bros. Ultimate. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.

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|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||Smash ||''Smash Bros. Ultimate.Ultimate''. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.


|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s || ||As of this writing, neither game has released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.

to:

|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s 2000s. || ||As of this writing, neither game has released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.


|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||Smash Bros. Ultimate. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.

to:

|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||Smash Bros. Ultimate. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.figures.
|| ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' (2019) || ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasyVersus'' (2019) || 2D fighting games that return to a more classically grounded style with high damage, stricter movement and shorter combos compared to the "anime" fighting games that have dominated the genre since the late 2000s || ||As of this writing, neither game has released yet, so a winner cannot be determined. However, both games have allowed players to get an early hands on in the form of demo builds and betas, leading to positive impressions to both from players that have tried them. Despite this, ''Granblue'' seems to have mounted a very slight lead thanks to the gorgeous graphics from ''Creator/ArcSystemWorks'' and the now-beloved characters and universe of ''VideoGame/GranblueFantasy.'' Additionally, ''Shodown'' and other games from ''Creator/SNKPlaymore'' tend to have more of a cult following compared to the mainstream success of ''Arc System Works'' titles.


|| ''VideoGame/SoulcaliburVI'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive6'' (2019) || 3D fighting games from series that are ''very'' well-known for {{fanservice}}, coming off a SequelGap with both having their last mainline installment in 2012, and set to be the big comeback for both franchises. || Both games feature new graphics, new gameplay mechanics, and are the sixth numbered sequel of their respective series, but a major difference in terms of execution is how they go about their trademark fanservice -- Whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' is choosing to [[TamerAndChaster severely cut back on the sex appeal in hopes of being taken more seriously]], ''Soulcalibur VI'' has decided to [[HotterAndSexier fully embrace it as a core part of its identity]]. || ''Soulcalibur VI''. Upon release, ''Soulcalibur VI'' received positive reviews across the board and became widely celebrated by fans, and having practically no real controversy to deter it, whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' had considerably less favorable reviews and all the way up to launch was OvershadowedByControversy over many things including the tamer fanservice, the constant FlipFlopOfGod, the shady tactics used to drive sales (including a ''93 dollar season pass'' at launch), and missing core features, among others, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks while changing very little in any positive way]]. ''Soulcalibur VI'' got an easy ticket to [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity EVO 2019]], whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' was completely passed up by EVO despite specifically aiming for it, effectively killing its tournament scene before it could begin, and sales were not good as it debuted at a mere ''#21'' on the UK charts alone, compared to ''SCVI'' reaching #5 and ''[=DOA6=]'''s direct predecessor selling over twice as much. Japan was slightly more favorable, as ''[=DOA6=]'' launched at #1 but only at just over 26,000 retail copies (considerably lower than past games), and only 2,000 more than what ''SCVI'' launched with, but the difference is very negligible overall as digital isn't counted in the equation. Ultimately, ''SCVI'' performed far better than ''[=DOA6=]'', selling over 400,000 units in the first week and over a million after a month. In comparison, ''[=DOA6=]'' merely ''shipped'' 350,000 units within nearly ''two months'' after the game's release.

to:

|| ''VideoGame/SoulcaliburVI'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive6'' (2019) || 3D fighting games from series that are ''very'' well-known for {{fanservice}}, coming off a SequelGap with both having their last mainline installment in 2012, and set to be the big comeback for both franchises. || Both games feature new graphics, new gameplay mechanics, and are the sixth numbered sequel of their respective series, but a major difference in terms of execution is how they go about their trademark fanservice -- Whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' is choosing to [[TamerAndChaster severely cut back on the sex appeal in hopes of being taken more seriously]], ''Soulcalibur VI'' has decided to [[HotterAndSexier fully embrace it as a core part of its identity]]. || ''Soulcalibur VI''. Upon release, ''Soulcalibur VI'' received positive reviews across the board and became widely celebrated by fans, and having practically no real controversy to deter it, whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' had considerably less favorable reviews and all the way up to launch was OvershadowedByControversy over many things including the tamer fanservice, the constant FlipFlopOfGod, the shady tactics used to drive sales (including a ''93 dollar season pass'' at launch), and missing core features, among others, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks while changing very little in any positive way]]. ''Soulcalibur VI'' got an easy ticket to [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity EVO 2019]], whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' was completely passed up by EVO despite specifically aiming for it, effectively killing its tournament scene before it could begin, and sales were not good as it debuted at a mere ''#21'' on the UK charts alone, compared to ''SCVI'' reaching #5 and ''[=DOA6=]'''s direct predecessor selling over twice as much. The US wasn't much kinder, either -- whereas ''SCVI'' placed at #8 on the monthly NPD Top 10 chart for October, ''[=DOA6=]'' failed to even make the Top 10 at all. Japan was slightly more favorable, as ''[=DOA6=]'' launched at #1 but only at just over 26,000 retail copies (considerably lower than past games), and only 2,000 more than what ''SCVI'' launched with, but the difference is very negligible overall as digital isn't counted in the equation. Ultimately, ''SCVI'' performed far better than ''[=DOA6=]'', selling over 400,000 units in the first week and over a million after a month. In comparison, ''[=DOA6=]'' merely ''shipped'' 350,000 units within nearly ''two months'' after the game's release.


|| ''VideoGame/SoulcaliburVI'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive6'' (2019) || 3D fighting games from series that are ''very'' well-known for {{fanservice}}, coming off a SequelGap with both having their last mainline installment in 2012, and set to be the big comeback for both franchises. || Both games feature new graphics, new gameplay mechanics, and are the sixth numbered sequel of their respective series, but a major difference in terms of execution is how they go about their trademark fanservice -- Whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' is choosing to [[TamerAndChaster severely cut back on the sex appeal in hopes of being taken more seriously]], ''Soulcalibur VI'' has decided to [[HotterAndSexier fully embrace it as a core part of its identity]]. || ''Soulcalibur VI''. Upon release, ''Soulcalibur VI'' received positive reviews across the board and became widely celebrated by fans, and having practically no real controversy to deter it, whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' had considerably less favorable reviews and all the way up to launch was OvershadowedByControversy over many things including the tamer fanservice, the constant FlipFlopOfGod, the shady tactics used to drive sales (including a ''93 dollar season pass'' at launch), and missing core features, among others, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks while changing very little in any positive way]]. ''Soulcalibur VI'' sold over a million units after a month with the launch being reported as successful, and got an easy ticket to [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity EVO 2019]], whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' was completely passed up by EVO despite specifically aiming for it, effectively killing its tournament scene before it could begin, and sales were not good as it debuted at a mere ''#21'' on the UK charts alone, compared to ''SCVI'' reaching #5 and ''[=DOA6=]'''s direct predecessor selling over twice as much. Japan was slightly more favorable, as ''[=DOA6=]'' launched at #1 but only at just over 26,000 retail copies (considerably lower than past games), and only 2,000 more than what ''SCVI'' launched with, but the difference is very negligible overall as digital isn't counted in the equation.

to:

|| ''VideoGame/SoulcaliburVI'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive6'' (2019) || 3D fighting games from series that are ''very'' well-known for {{fanservice}}, coming off a SequelGap with both having their last mainline installment in 2012, and set to be the big comeback for both franchises. || Both games feature new graphics, new gameplay mechanics, and are the sixth numbered sequel of their respective series, but a major difference in terms of execution is how they go about their trademark fanservice -- Whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' is choosing to [[TamerAndChaster severely cut back on the sex appeal in hopes of being taken more seriously]], ''Soulcalibur VI'' has decided to [[HotterAndSexier fully embrace it as a core part of its identity]]. || ''Soulcalibur VI''. Upon release, ''Soulcalibur VI'' received positive reviews across the board and became widely celebrated by fans, and having practically no real controversy to deter it, whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' had considerably less favorable reviews and all the way up to launch was OvershadowedByControversy over many things including the tamer fanservice, the constant FlipFlopOfGod, the shady tactics used to drive sales (including a ''93 dollar season pass'' at launch), and missing core features, among others, [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks while changing very little in any positive way]]. ''Soulcalibur VI'' sold over a million units after a month with the launch being reported as successful, and got an easy ticket to [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity EVO 2019]], whereas ''Dead or Alive 6'' was completely passed up by EVO despite specifically aiming for it, effectively killing its tournament scene before it could begin, and sales were not good as it debuted at a mere ''#21'' on the UK charts alone, compared to ''SCVI'' reaching #5 and ''[=DOA6=]'''s direct predecessor selling over twice as much. Japan was slightly more favorable, as ''[=DOA6=]'' launched at #1 but only at just over 26,000 retail copies (considerably lower than past games), and only 2,000 more than what ''SCVI'' launched with, but the difference is very negligible overall as digital isn't counted in the equation. Ultimately, ''SCVI'' performed far better than ''[=DOA6=]'', selling over 400,000 units in the first week and over a million after a month. In comparison, ''[=DOA6=]'' merely ''shipped'' 350,000 units within nearly ''two months'' after the game's release.


|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||Smash Bros. Ultimate. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighter, Ridley, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]].

to:

|| ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' (2018) || ''VideoGame/JumpForce'' (2019) || Crossover fighting games in which characters from Nintendo's history (Smash Bros.) or multiple Magazine/ShonenJump franchises (Jump Force) come together to fight against each other. || ||Smash Bros. Ultimate. While Smash Bros.' roster welcomed back everyone included in the series, past and present, including long-awaited fighter, Ridley, fighters like Ridley and King K. Rool, Jump Force's roster was divisive from the moment that the game was finalized. This included the divisive Created Character, which people have grown tired of now, as well as original characters, Kane and Galena, which are mainly seen as expies of [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse Mira and Towa]]. In terms of sales (at least in Japan), despite ''Ultimate'' being a Switch exclusive and ''Jump Force'' coming out on every console that isn't the Switch (namely [=PS4=], Xbox One and PC), the former managed to blow the competition out of the water by selling 1.2 million copies during its first week, while the latter could only muster barely a tenth of those figures.

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