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** And then came the 2019 season opener, in which Georgia State paid a visit to Knoxville. On paper, it looked like a Vols blowout in the making, with Vegas sports books installing the Vols as 25-point favorites. The Panthers, out of the Sun Belt Conference, didn't start their football program until ''2010''. And were coming off a 2–10 season, ending with seven straight losses, with only one loss in that streak by less than two touchdowns. ''And'' one of the two wins was over an FCS team. On top of that, GSU had never beaten a Power Five team in its history. Final score: Georgia State 38, Tennessee 30. [[http://www.coacheshotseat.com A website]] that tracks FBS coaches that it sees as being on the proverbial "hot seat" (most likely to be fired) immediately elevated Pruitt to its #1 ranking.

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** *** And then came the 2019 season opener, in which Georgia State paid a visit to Knoxville. On paper, it looked like a Vols blowout in the making, with Vegas sports books installing the Vols as 25-point favorites. The Panthers, out of the Sun Belt Conference, didn't start their football program until ''2010''. And were coming off a 2–10 season, ending with seven straight losses, with only one loss in that streak by less than two touchdowns. ''And'' one of the two wins was over an FCS team. On top of that, GSU had never beaten a Power Five team in its history. Final score: Georgia State 38, Tennessee 30. [[http://www.coacheshotseat.com A website]] that tracks FBS coaches that it sees as being on the proverbial "hot seat" (most likely to be fired) immediately elevated Pruitt to its #1 ranking.


** The start of Frost's Nebraska tenure didn't look good at all. The Huskers were ''0–6'' at the halfway mark of the 2018 season, the worst start in school history. That said, two of those losses were by less than a touchdown, and a third was in overtime. Another loss later in the season, at highly-ranked Ohio State, was also by less than a TD. It's still too soon to tell how much of the blame belongs to Frost, since most neutral accounts indicate that Riley left the cupboard almost totally bare.

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** The start of Frost's Nebraska tenure didn't look good at all. The Huskers were ''0–6'' at the halfway mark of the 2018 season, the worst start in school history. history, and ended 4–8, their worst record since ''1958''. That said, two three of those losses were by less than a touchdown, and a third another was in overtime. Another loss later in the Most members of Husker Nation gave Frost a pass for that first season, at highly-ranked Ohio State, was also by less than a TD. It's still too soon to tell how much of the blame belongs to Frost, since (1) most neutral accounts indicate that Riley left the cupboard almost totally bare.bare, and (2) a few small breaks could have gotten them into a bowl.


** And then came the 2019 season opener, in which Georgia State paid a visit to Knoxville. On paper, it looked like a Vols blowout in the making, with Vegas sports books installing the Vols as 25-point favorites. The Panthers, out of the Sun Belt Conference, didn't start their football program until ''2010''. And were coming off a 2–10 season, ending with seven straight losses, with only one loss in that streak by less than two touchdowns. ''And'' one of the two wins was over an FCS team. On top of that, GSU had never beaten a Power Five team in its history. Final score: Georgia State 38, Tennessee 30.

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** And then came the 2019 season opener, in which Georgia State paid a visit to Knoxville. On paper, it looked like a Vols blowout in the making, with Vegas sports books installing the Vols as 25-point favorites. The Panthers, out of the Sun Belt Conference, didn't start their football program until ''2010''. And were coming off a 2–10 season, ending with seven straight losses, with only one loss in that streak by less than two touchdowns. ''And'' one of the two wins was over an FCS team. On top of that, GSU had never beaten a Power Five team in its history. Final score: Georgia State 38, Tennessee 30. [[http://www.coacheshotseat.com A website]] that tracks FBS coaches that it sees as being on the proverbial "hot seat" (most likely to be fired) immediately elevated Pruitt to its #1 ranking.


* Swedish men's tennis is in an even worse state than American and Australian men's tennis. While the U.S. and Australia still at least have multiple male players ranked in the top 100, Sweden has struggled to produce even ''one'' top 100-caliber player ever since Robin Söderling's career was tragically cut short by mononucleosis in 2011 -- in May 2019, the highest-ranked Swede in the ATP rankings was Elias Ymer at No. 115. That's quite a steep fall from relevance for a country who used to be a tennis powerhouse with Hall of Fame-worthy players like Björn Borg, Mats Wilander, and Stefan Edberg in the 1970-90s.

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* Swedish men's tennis is in an even worse state than American and Australian men's tennis. While the U.S. and Australia still at least have multiple male players ranked in the top 100, Sweden has struggled to produce even ''one'' top 100-caliber player ever since Robin Söderling's career was tragically cut short by mononucleosis in 2011 -- in May September 2019, the highest-ranked Swede only two Swedes were even in the ATP rankings was top 200, with brothers Mikael (younger) and Elias Ymer (older) respectively at No. 115.107 and 116. That's quite a steep fall from relevance for a country who used to be a tennis powerhouse with Hall of Fame-worthy players like Björn Borg, Mats Wilander, and Stefan Edberg in the 1970-90s.


* There was the seismic collapse of the Chicago Bulls after their second three-peat. Michael Jordan retired for the second time. Phil Jackson sat out the next season and resurfaced as the new head coach of the Lakers. Luc Longley, Scottie Pippen, Steve Kerr, and Dennis Rodman all left as well. Chicago wouldn't see the playoffs again until 2005.
* The New York Knicks have been in a Dork Age since 1973, the last year they won the championship, especially since they have only made the NBA Finals twice in the more than 40 years. But the years following that last Finals trip in 1999 have been especially lean. The Knicks have only made it past the first round of the playoffs once since 2001, missing the playoffs 10 times in that span. They have brought in the likes of Lenny Wilkens, Larry Brown, Isiah Thomas and even Phil Jackson to turn things around, and yet things just seem to get worse and worse. Jackson’s first year as team president saw them hit rock bottom, as their 17 wins in 2014–15 were the fewest in franchise history - for a team that dates back to the NBA’s founding, including the early years where they played at least 20 games fewer in a season than they do now. Not helping is Jackson's BornInTheWrongCentury attitude, as he repeatedly made statements on how teams could not win titles if their offense revolves around three-point shooting. Knicks fans facepalmed as four of the top five 3-point shooting teams made the conference finals (with the fifth team, the Clippers, knocked out the previous round) with the title going to the Golden State Warriors, led by MVP UsefulNotes/StephenCurry, who broke his own record for most 3s made in a season, as well as setting a new playoff record.

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* There was the seismic collapse of the Chicago Bulls after their second three-peat. Michael Jordan retired for the second time. Phil Jackson sat out the next season and resurfaced as the new head coach of the Lakers. Luc Longley, Scottie Pippen, Steve Kerr, UsefulNotes/SteveKerr, and Dennis Rodman all left as well. Chicago wouldn't see the playoffs again until 2005.
* The New York Knicks have been in a Dork Age since 1973, the last year they won the championship, especially since they have only made the NBA Finals twice in the more than 40 years. But the years following that last Finals trip in 1999 have been especially lean. The Knicks have only made it past the first round of the playoffs once since 2001, missing the playoffs 10 times in that span. They have brought in the likes of Lenny Wilkens, Larry Brown, Isiah Thomas and even Phil Jackson to turn things around, and yet things just seem to get worse and worse. Jackson’s first year as team president saw them hit rock bottom, as their 17 wins in 2014–15 were the fewest in franchise history - for a team that dates back to the NBA’s NBA's founding, including the early years where they played at least 20 games fewer in a season than they do now. Not helping is Jackson's BornInTheWrongCentury attitude, as he repeatedly made statements on how teams could not win titles if their offense revolves around three-point shooting. Knicks fans facepalmed as four of the top five 3-point shooting teams made the conference finals (with the fifth team, the Clippers, knocked out the previous round) with the title going to the Golden State Warriors, led by MVP UsefulNotes/StephenCurry, who broke his own record for most 3s made in a season, as well as setting a new playoff record.



** The Golden State Warriors underwent a drastic style change after being purchased by Chris Cohan in 1997, abandoning the Blue and Yellow they had worn since they moved to the Bay and utilizing an Orange and Navy Blue color scheme. Unsurprisingly, fans cheered when new owner Joe Lacob announced the return of Blue and Yellow in 2010 [[note]] The Warriors' improved fortunes after the return of the new colors probably helped as well [[/note]]. That being said, the second iteration (worn from 2001-2010) of the Orange-and-Navy jerseys (nicknamed the "We Believe" Jerseys due to their association with the Dubs' upset of the Mavericks in the 2007 playoffs) [[NostalgiaFilter has been viewed more favorably among the fanbase]]; so much so that the Warriors revived said jerseys during Golden State's last game at Oracle Arena. [[note]] The first iteration (1997-2001) has less fans, in part due to a gaudy, thunderbolt-filled design that just screams "Screen Fever" [[/note]].
** After their 1995 Championship, the Houston Rockets replaced the plain red, white, and yellow look that the team sported during most of their history with an drastically different Red and Dark Gray aesthetic that featured weirdly pinstriped Jerseys and a logo that featured a snarling cartoon rocket. Fans didn't miss that look very much after the team introduced a more stylish red and white look during the Yao Ming era.

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** The Golden State Warriors underwent a drastic style change after being purchased by Chris Cohan in 1997, abandoning the Blue and Yellow they had worn since they moved to the Bay and utilizing an Orange and Navy Blue color scheme. Unsurprisingly, fans cheered when new owner Joe Lacob announced the return of Blue and Yellow in 2010 [[note]] The Warriors' improved fortunes after the return of the new colors probably helped as well [[/note]]. That being said, the second iteration (worn from 2001-2010) of the Orange-and-Navy jerseys (nicknamed the "We Believe" Jerseys due to their association with the Dubs' upset of the Mavericks in the 2007 playoffs) [[NostalgiaFilter has been viewed more favorably among the fanbase]]; so much so that the Warriors revived said jerseys during Golden State's last game at Oracle Arena. [[note]] The first iteration (1997-2001) has less fans, in part due to a gaudy, thunderbolt-filled design that just screams "Screen Fever" [[/note]].
Fever".[[/note]]
** After their 1995 Championship, championship, the Houston Rockets replaced the plain red, white, and yellow look that the team sported during most of their history with an drastically different Red and Dark Gray aesthetic that featured weirdly pinstriped Jerseys and a logo that featured a snarling cartoon rocket. Fans didn't miss that look very much after the team introduced a more stylish red and white look during the Yao Ming era.



** Cleveland Cavaliers fans weren't too keen on the team changing their colors from red and gold to orange and blue in 1983. The 1995 switch to black and light blue was received more poorly, in part due to the horrible uniforms that the Cavs wore during that time period. The return of red was celebrated in 2003, although the arrival of UsefulNotes/LebronJames may have played a factor into that.

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** Cleveland Cavaliers fans weren't too keen on the team changing their colors from red and gold to orange and blue in 1983. The 1995 switch to black and light blue was received more poorly, in part due to the horrible uniforms that the Cavs wore during that time period. The return of red was celebrated in 2003, although the arrival of UsefulNotes/LebronJames UsefulNotes/LeBronJames may have played a factor into that.



* The storied Boston Celtics also had quite the dark age of their own once the star-studded Larry Bird-led teams of the 80's fell apart. The DorkAge began on a tragic note, as Bird's [[WhatCouldHaveBeen would-be successor]] Len Bias [[AuthorExistenceFailure died of a cocaine overdose]]. The Celtics would still remain competitive for a while, but Larry Bird's [[GameBreakingInjury numerous back and foot issues]] would start to plague the team as they fell from a Title Contender to an also-ran. Boston would drop like a stone once TheNineties started rolling: Larry Bird retired in 1992, promising young star Reggie Lewis [[AuthorExistenceFailure died in 1993 due to heart issues]], aging stars Kevin [=McHale=] and Robert Parish left the team, and a gutted Celtics team would miss the playoffs for the first time in 1994. The Celtics then spent the middle part of the decade retooling their roster with younger players, with some panning out (Dino Radja, Dee Brown, Davis Wesley, Rick Fox) and some flopping (Eric Montross, Eric Williams, Dana Barros), but could never quite get over the hump in a stacked Eastern Conference, culminating in the team losing a franchise-record 67 games in 1996. While the playoff misses continued as the 90's drew to a close, the Celtics seemed to be on the way to renewed glory under renowned college coach Rick Pitino, sporting younger stars like Paul Pierce, Chauncey Billups, and Antoine Walker. While the likes of Pitino and Billups ended up as relative disappointments, Pierce would end up becoming the Celtics' newest franchise player. His rise to stardom coincided with the team crawling back to respectability in the 2000's, culminating in Boston [[EarnYourHappyEnding finally winning their 17th Championship in 2008]] once Kevin Garnett, Rajon Rondo, and Ray Allen arrived.

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* The storied Boston Celtics also had quite the dark age of their own once the star-studded Larry Bird-led teams of the 80's fell apart. The DorkAge began on a tragic note, as Bird's [[WhatCouldHaveBeen would-be successor]] Len Bias [[AuthorExistenceFailure died of a cocaine overdose]]. The Celtics would still remain competitive for a while, but Larry Bird's [[GameBreakingInjury numerous back and foot issues]] would start to plague the team as they fell from a Title Contender to an also-ran. Boston would drop like a stone once TheNineties started rolling: Larry Bird retired in 1992, promising young star Reggie Lewis [[AuthorExistenceFailure died in 1993 due to heart issues]], aging stars Kevin [=McHale=] and Robert Parish left the team, and a gutted Celtics team would miss the playoffs for the first time in 1994. The Celtics then spent the middle part of the decade retooling their roster with younger players, with some panning out (Dino Radja, Dee Brown, Davis Wesley, Rick Fox) and some flopping (Eric Montross, Eric Williams, Dana Barros), but could never quite get over the hump in a stacked Eastern Conference, culminating in the team losing a franchise-record 67 games in 1996. While the playoff misses continued as the 90's drew to a close, the Celtics seemed to be on the way to renewed glory under renowned college coach Rick Pitino, sporting younger stars like Paul Pierce, Chauncey Billups, and Antoine Walker. While the likes of Pitino and Billups ended up as relative disappointments, Pierce would end up becoming the Celtics' newest franchise player. His rise to stardom coincided with the team crawling back to respectability in the 2000's, culminating in Boston [[EarnYourHappyEnding finally winning their 17th Championship championship in 2008]] once Kevin Garnett, Rajon Rondo, and Ray Allen arrived.



** After Wilt Chamberlain was traded to the Lakers in 1967, the Sixers spiraled downhill as star players Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham followed suit, which led to the team missing the playoffs for the first time ever in 1972. Next season saw the team reach new lows, as a depleted Sixers squad containing a past-it Hal Greer and a bunch of nobodies posted a 9-73 record, which stood for the longest time as the worst ever season record in NBA history. Philly bounced back to playoff contention shortly afterwards, signing George [=McGinnis=], drafting Darryl Dawkins, and hiring Gene Shue as coach. The Sixers then acquired Julius Erving from the Nets after 1976's ABA-NBA merger, which brought the team back into the ranks of the NBA's elite.

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** After Wilt Chamberlain UsefulNotes/WiltChamberlain was traded to the Lakers in 1967, the Sixers spiraled downhill as star players Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham followed suit, which led to the team missing the playoffs for the first time ever in 1972. Next season saw the team reach new lows, as a depleted Sixers squad containing a past-it Hal Greer and a bunch of nobodies posted a 9-73 record, which stood for the longest time as the worst ever season record in NBA history. Philly bounced back to playoff contention shortly afterwards, signing George [=McGinnis=], drafting Darryl Dawkins, and hiring Gene Shue as coach. The Sixers then acquired Julius Erving from the Nets after 1976's ABA-NBA merger, which brought the team back into the ranks of the NBA's elite.



* The Portland Trailblazers' "Jail Blazer" era of the early to mid-2000's is considered to be this by Blazers fans. At the start of the "Jail Blazers" era, the Trailblazers played host to players with frequent off-the-court troubles such as Rasheed Wallace, Qyntel Woods, Zach Randolph, Darius Miles, Bonzi Wells, Ruben Patterson, and Damon Stoudamire. While the team remained successful at first, fans weren't receptive to the frequent legal troubles of the teams' stars. Portland attempted to improve the team's image by trading away the troublesome Wallace and Wells in 2003, but that only served to mire the Trailblazers in mediocrity while the on-and-off the court issues of the remaining "Jail Blazers" (e.g. Patterson, Randolph, Miles) continued to alienate fans. It wasn't until the latter part of the decade that Portland's fortunes improved; by that time, many of the "Jail Blazers" had left, and the Blazers would proceed to build around talented AND relatively trouble-free young stars such as LaMarcus Aldridge and Brandon Roy [[note]] That being said, the Blazers did commit one of the most infamous Draft day fuck-ups around that time, selecting Greg Oden over Kevin Durant in 2007 [[/note]] .

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* The Portland Trailblazers' Trail Blazers' "Jail Blazer" era of the early to mid-2000's is considered to be this by Blazers fans. At the start of the "Jail Blazers" era, the Trailblazers played host to players with frequent off-the-court troubles such as Rasheed Wallace, Qyntel Woods, Zach Randolph, Darius Miles, Bonzi Wells, Ruben Patterson, and Damon Stoudamire. While the team remained successful at first, fans weren't receptive to the frequent legal troubles of the teams' stars. Portland attempted to improve the team's image by trading away the troublesome Wallace and Wells in 2003, but that only served to mire the Trailblazers in mediocrity while the on-and-off the court issues of the remaining "Jail Blazers" (e.g. Patterson, Randolph, Miles) continued to alienate fans. It wasn't until the latter part of the decade that Portland's fortunes improved; by that time, many of the "Jail Blazers" had left, and the Blazers would proceed to build around talented AND relatively trouble-free young stars such as LaMarcus Aldridge and [=LaMarcus=] Aldridge, Brandon Roy Roy, and most notably Damian Lillard.[[note]] That being said, the Blazers did commit one of the most infamous Draft day fuck-ups around that time, selecting Greg Oden over Kevin Durant in 2007 [[/note]] .2007.[[/note]]



** Thankfully, hiring Mississippi State head coach Dan Mullen for the 2018 season seems to have done Florida a world of good, as the Gators managed to stay consistently ranked in the latter half of the season, even upsetting #5 LSU and avenging their loss to South Carolina. But they were still upset by Missouri and Kentucky (admittedly, the latter had its best season in ''decades''), signaling it's too soon to call whether this Dork Age has truly ended or not.

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** Thankfully, hiring Mississippi State head coach Dan Mullen for the 2018 season seems to have done Florida a world of good, as the Gators managed to stay consistently ranked in the latter half of the season, even upsetting #5 LSU and avenging their loss to South Carolina. But they were still upset by Missouri and Kentucky (admittedly, the latter had its best season in ''decades''), since ''the '70s''), signaling it's too soon to call whether this Dork Age has truly ended or not.


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** And then came the 2019 season opener, in which Georgia State paid a visit to Knoxville. On paper, it looked like a Vols blowout in the making, with Vegas sports books installing the Vols as 25-point favorites. The Panthers, out of the Sun Belt Conference, didn't start their football program until ''2010''. And were coming off a 2–10 season, ending with seven straight losses, with only one loss in that streak by less than two touchdowns. ''And'' one of the two wins was over an FCS team. On top of that, GSU had never beaten a Power Five team in its history. Final score: Georgia State 38, Tennessee 30.


** Leeds United have been in one for so long that most would argue that it's ceased to be a Dork Age and simply become their new status quo. After being a highly successful club in the 1960s, 1970s and 1990s, they were nearly sent into bankruptcy by massive financial mismanagement in the early 2000s, getting them relegated from the Premier League in 2004 and then from the division below it, the Championship in 2007. This nearly resulted in them being sent out of business altogether, only avoiding do so thanks to some LoopholeAbuse due to the Football Association's insolvency laws being so ill-defined at the time.[[note]](had they tried it nowadays they'd have been demoted to the Northern Premier League, ''six divisions'' below the Premier League)[[/note]] They eventually got back into the Championship three years later, but have since been mostly floundering around trying to avoid being relegated again. Worse still, their reputation had been rendered so utterly toxic that no reputable owner would go within ten miles of the club, resulting in them ending up with a succession of shady owners who further wrecked their already-appalling reputation until a ''somewhat'' respectable owner ended up buying them in 2017. Adding insult to injury, between 2004 and 2016, Leeds was the largest city in ''Europe'' not to have a team in the top-flight of their domestic league, and can't even boast that distinction any more (Birmingham took it over following Aston Villa's relegation from the Premier League in 2016).

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** Leeds United have been in one for so long that most would argue that it's ceased to be a Dork Age and simply become their new status quo. After being a highly successful club in the 1960s, 1970s and 1990s, they were nearly sent into bankruptcy by massive financial mismanagement in the early 2000s, getting them relegated from the Premier League in 2004 and then from the division below it, the Championship in 2007. This nearly resulted in them being sent out of business altogether, only avoiding do so thanks to some LoopholeAbuse due to the Football Association's insolvency laws being so ill-defined at the time.[[note]](had they tried it nowadays they'd have been demoted to the Northern Premier League, ''six divisions'' below the Premier League)[[/note]] They eventually got back into the Championship three years later, but have since been mostly floundering around trying to avoid being relegated again. Worse still, their reputation had been rendered so utterly toxic that no reputable owner would go within ten miles of the club, resulting in them ending up with a succession of shady owners who further wrecked their already-appalling reputation until a ''somewhat'' respectable owner ended up buying them in 2017. Adding insult to injury, between 2004 and 2016, Leeds was Then, just when it looked like they had turned the largest city in ''Europe'' not to have a team corner in the top-flight 2018-19 season, most of their domestic league, which they spent at the top of the Championship, they utterly imploded in the final months, missed out on automatic promotion, and can't even boast that distinction any more (Birmingham took it over following Aston Villa's relegation from then got thrashed in the Premier League in 2016).promotion play-offs.



** As soon as Eriksson left, however, England fell straight back into a Dork Age that lasted a full decade. Assistant coach Steve [=McClaren=] was appointed as Eriksson's replacement, but a thoroughly disastrous Euro 2008 qualifying campaign in which England never once looked like qualifying saw him sacked after barely a year. Another foreign coach, Fabio Capello was then hired, and oversaw a much stronger performance in the 2010 World Cup qualifiers, only for the side to just barely stumble through an easy group and promptly be obliterated 4-1 by Germany in the first knock-out match. Despite most of the press demanding that he be sacked and replaced by Tottenham Hotspur manager Harry Redknapp, Capello remained in charge for the Euro 2012 qualifiers, which again saw England win their group, only for Capello to be sacked a few months before the tournament for mouthing off against the Football Association. The FA replaced him not with Redknapp, but with experienced journeyman Roy Hodgson, who managed a surprisingly decent performance at Euro 2012, only to oversee disastrous performances at both the 2014 World Cup (in which they failed to win a single goal and finished bottom of their group) and Euro 2016 (where they again struggled through a theoretically easy group, and promptly lost in the knock-out rounds to ''Iceland'', the smallest team in the competition), resigning after the latter tournament. Sam Allardyce was next to take on the job, only to be forced out after just ''67 days'' following a corruption scandal, leading to youth coach Gareth Southgate[[note]](whose only other managerial experience was managing Middlesbrough a decade previously, where he took over a team that had actually been doing well under the aforementioned Steve [=McClaren=], promptly got them relegated, and was sacked shortly into the following season)[[/note]] being thrown the job as basically the only person who wanted it. Under Southgate, however, England surpassed rock-bottom expectations to make the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup, leaving a glimmer of hope that the Dork Age may be at an end.

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** As soon as Eriksson left, however, England fell straight back into a Dork Age that lasted a full decade. Assistant coach Steve [=McClaren=] was appointed as Eriksson's replacement, but a thoroughly disastrous Euro 2008 qualifying campaign in which England never once looked like qualifying saw him sacked after barely a year. Another foreign coach, Fabio Capello was then hired, and oversaw a much stronger performance in the 2010 World Cup qualifiers, only for the side to just barely stumble through an easy group and promptly be obliterated 4-1 by Germany in the first knock-out match. Despite most of the press demanding that he be sacked and replaced by Tottenham Hotspur manager Harry Redknapp, Capello remained in charge for the Euro 2012 qualifiers, which again saw England win their group, only for Capello to be sacked a few months before the tournament for mouthing off against the Football Association. The FA replaced him not with Redknapp, but with experienced journeyman Roy Hodgson, who managed a surprisingly decent performance at Euro 2012, only to oversee disastrous performances at both the 2014 World Cup (in which they failed to win a single goal game and finished bottom of their group) and Euro 2016 (where they again struggled through a theoretically easy group, and promptly lost in the knock-out rounds to ''Iceland'', the smallest team in the competition), resigning after the latter tournament. Sam Allardyce was next to take on the job, only to be forced out after just ''67 days'' following a corruption scandal, leading to youth coach Gareth Southgate[[note]](whose only other managerial experience was managing Middlesbrough a decade previously, where he took over a team that had actually been doing well under the aforementioned Steve [=McClaren=], promptly got them relegated, and was sacked shortly into the following season)[[/note]] being thrown the job as basically the only person who wanted it. Under Southgate, however, England surpassed rock-bottom expectations to make the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup, leaving a glimmer of hope that the Dork Age may be at an end.



Folder has been alphabetized by city. Please add new examples in the appropriate order.



* The entire Jimmy Johnson era and legacy is in turn a dork age for the Dolphins. Johnson's insistence that it would be his team, built his way, meant clashes with Marino (particularly over Johnson's attempts to trade him), the team's best player; and Johnson used high picks on running backs such as John Avery and James Johnson (no relation), who ended up as role players at best. And he brought in Cecil "the Diesel" Collins, who went to prison for probation violations before even playing a season (he was only a fifth-round pick, but the embarrassment was still strong). Johnson resigned in 1999, and hand-selected Wannstedt as his successor, and the Dolphins have been ordinary (at best) ever since.
** If that was bad, however, their 2007 season, with Cam Cameron behind the wheel, was even worse. They were literally a hair away from going 0-16 the year before Detroit did, and managed to eke out one win, in being in Week 15 against the Baltimore Ravens in overtime. He was thankfully fired once the disaster of a season was through, but since then they've only had winning seasons twice (2008 and 2016), and both times would lose in the Wild Card round of the playoffs.
* The San Diego Chargers were in a Dork Age from 1996 through 2003, where they failed to make the playoffs and never won more than half of their games. The Ryan Leaf era (1998 and 2000) deserves a special mention, as he threw more interceptions than touchdowns and became one of the worst draft picks of all time. Leaf's 2000 campaign saw the Chargers go 1-15, they replaced him with Drew Brees at quarterback, and the rest is history. And they left San Diego for their original home of Los Angeles after the 2016 season.
* The first five years of Jerry Jones owning the Dallas Cowboys netted two Super Bowl championships. Then Jones fired coach Jimmy Johnson for daring to demand credit for the championships, thus establishing Jones as the only man in charge - and the Cowboys have suffered ever since. They had enough talent for one more championship in 1995, but have won two playoff games since, with the wins 13 years apart. Why? As one of the few sole general manager-owners in the league, Jones cannot draft fundamentals (like an offensive line) to save his life, frequently takes chances on players who had injury problems in college like [=DeMarco=] Murray (that have carried over into injury-plagued NFL seasons) and has on at least two occasions traded away multiple draft picks for underachievers like Joey Galloway and Roy Williams. While they eventually found some good skill players like linebacker/defensive end [=DeMarcus=] Ware and wide receiver Dez Bryant, management's inability to draft the basics for a team has cost the Cowboys multiple chances at returning to prominence, especially since the advent of Tony Romo and later Dak Prescott becoming the starting quarterback.

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* When it comes to the Dork Age of Sports, Who Dey! Who Dey! Who Dey think gonna beat dem Cincinnati Bengals?! 25 years without a playoff win. Seven playoff games = seven embarrassing losses; the last five, in a franchise-record playoffs streak from 2011–15, resulted in an NFL record for consecutive first round losses, including two squandered division titles (2013, 2015). A Who's Who List of Draft Busts and Questionable-at-Best Free Agent Pickups. A scouting department and coaching staffs full of {{yes m|an}}en. A tortured fanbase ''foaming at the mouth'' for a better team. And the one constant string-puller in the last two decades of debacles? Mike Brown.
* The entire Jimmy Johnson era and legacy is in turn a dork age for the Dolphins. Johnson's insistence that it would be his team, built his way, meant clashes with Marino (particularly over Johnson's attempts to trade him), the team's best player; and Johnson used high picks on running backs such as John Avery and James Johnson (no relation), who ended up as role players at best. And he brought in Cecil "the Diesel" Collins, who went to prison for probation violations before even playing a season (he was only a fifth-round pick, but the embarrassment was still strong). Johnson resigned in 1999, and hand-selected Wannstedt as his successor, and the Dolphins have been ordinary (at best) ever since.
Cleveland Browns:
** If A once-successful franchise that was bad, however, their 2007 season, with Cam Cameron behind the wheel, was even worse. They home of legendary running back Jim Brown and a long history that included four NFL championships, and three titles when they were literally a hair away from going 0-16 part of the year All-America Football Conference before Detroit did, that league folded and managed the Browns jumped to eke out the NFL itself. Though they never won a championship in the "Super Bowl" era (1967 to present) they did have 14 playoff appearances and were, at worst, a respectable team. Then, in 1995, owner Art Modell controversially uprooted the franchise and moved them to Baltimore. The city of Cleveland filed a lawsuit and were allowed to hold on to the Browns name and history, in hopes of one win, in being in Week 15 against day returning to play under a new franchise, which they were eventually awarded, and after a three-year hiatus, the Baltimore Ravens in overtime. He was thankfully fired once Browns returned to the disaster of a season was through, but since then NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Since then, they've been a disaster, posting a 88–216 record through the 2017 season. They have had only had two winning seasons twice (2008 (2002, 2007), and 2016), and both times would lose in the Wild Card round of the playoffs.
* The San Diego Chargers were in a Dork Age from 1996 through 2003, where they failed to make
only made the playoffs once as a wild card team. The reason for the continued ineptitude are multiple, and include a revolving-door at both the head coach and Quarterback positions they can never seem to fix, years of bad draft picks, injuries, and embarrassing legal problems with the ownership. Playing in a tough division opposite Baltimore, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh hasn't helped, either. To add salt to the wound, the "old" Cleveland Browns (now Baltimore Ravens) have since won two Super Bowls, while the "new" Browns are widely viewed as the league's ButtMonkey franchise.
** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johnny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2018 season, the team has had 30 starting quarterbacks in 20 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had ''five'' starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Creator/TomBrady, Brady fill-ins Matt Cassel and Jimmy Garoppolo, plus Jacoby Brissett, who filled in when Garoppolo was hurt and Brady suspended for Deflategate -- over the same period of time. And given the woes of all starting Quarterbacks since then "draft bust" Tim Couch (who was not worth a first overall pick, granted, but he was not ''that'' bad) starts to look pretty good for a Browns QB. That said, it does look like 2018 top pick Baker Mayfield, who took over as the starter in Week 3, is the real deal, seeing that he led the Browns to 7 wins,
more than half of their games. they had in the previous three seasons combined. Though you never know with the Browns...
** Entering the 2019 season, the quarterback who has won the most regular-season games in Cleveland since the Browns returned to the league is Ben Roethlisberger. Who has spent his entire NFL career with the ''Steelers''.
**
The Ryan Leaf era (1998 and 2000) deserves a special mention, as he threw more interceptions than touchdowns and became one "new" Browns went on to share NFL infamy with the 2008 Lions in 2017, when they cratered all the way to 0-16. Any hope of improvement was dashed, however, when coach Hue Jackson, who has gone 1-31 since taking the helm of the worst draft picks of all time. Leaf's 2000 campaign saw the Chargers go 1-15, they replaced him with Drew Brees at quarterback, and the rest is history. And they left San Diego team in 2016, was retained for a third year.[[note]]At least until he was fired after their original home of Los Angeles after week 8 loss to the 2016 season.
Pittsburgh Steelers.[[/note]] That, combined with the fact that the current owner (since 2012), Pilot Flying J head Jimmy Haslam, seems more concerned with lining his pockets and/or trying to keep his truck stop chain afloat[[note]]he was raided by an IRS/FBI joint strike team at one point![[/note]] than building a good front office, has led many a Browns fan to consider the current state of the Lions[[note]]an occasional playoff entrant with a capable QB, a few other good pieces and enough holes for any other playoff-caliber team to drive a tractor-trailer through[[/note]] a wistful fantasy.
* Dallas Cowboys:
**
The first five years of Jerry Jones owning the Dallas Cowboys netted two Super Bowl championships. Then Jones fired coach Jimmy Johnson for daring to demand credit for the championships, thus establishing Jones as the only man in charge - and the Cowboys have suffered ever since. They had enough talent for one more championship in 1995, but have won two playoff games since, with the wins 13 years apart. Why? As one of the few sole general manager-owners in the league, Jones cannot draft fundamentals (like an offensive line) to save his life, frequently takes chances on players who had injury problems in college like [=DeMarco=] Murray (that have carried over into injury-plagued NFL seasons) and has on at least two occasions traded away multiple draft picks for underachievers like Joey Galloway and Roy Williams. While they eventually found some good skill players like linebacker/defensive end [=DeMarcus=] Ware and wide receiver Dez Bryant, management's inability to draft the basics for a team has cost the Cowboys multiple chances at returning to prominence, especially since the advent of Tony Romo and later Dak Prescott becoming the starting quarterback.



* Green Bay was known as "NFL Siberia" from 1968, the year after Vince Lombardi retired as head coach, and 1992 when General Manager Ron Wolf brought in Mike Holmgren to coach, traded for Brett Favre, and signed Reggie White following the season. To give some perspective, they [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome won five championships in Lombardi's final seven years]] and made the playoffs six straight times after signing Reggie White, including two NFC titles and a Super Bowl.

to:

* The Denver Broncos...Nine of the ten American Football League teams have points of pride they can point to from the league's ten-year history. Six of the original eight (Houston, Dallas/Kansas City, San Diego, Buffalo, Oakland, New York) won championships, Boston (now New England) had a Championship appearance in 1963 and sported several future Hall-of-Famers, Miami was the first AFL expansion team and brought pro football to Florida, and Cincinnati brought Paul Brown back to pro football. And then there's the Broncos, who were the league's perennial doormat. The only team of the original eight to never post a winning season, they also had the additional stigma of sporting one of the [[http://blog.heritagesportsart.com/2010/08/denver-broncos-uniform-and-team-history.html all-time ugliest uniforms in all of pro sports]] for their first three years. Broncos fans tend not to EVER bring up their AFL years, though things did get much better post-NFL/AFL merger, with the "Orange Crush" defense driving the Broncos' success in the '70s, and John Elway leading the team to more success in the '80s and '90s.
* The Detroit Lions fell into a long, mostly uninterrupted Dork Age since "The Curse of Bobby Layne" set in in 1958. Before this point, they had four NFL championships, including three in six seasons. Since then, the team has accumulated twelve total playoff games, one total playoff win (in 1991), zero Super Bowl appearances (the only franchise in the NFC as of 2017) and the worst overall winning percentage of any team in the NFL. Barry Sanders, the team's longtime running back, retired before the 1999 season (at the top of his game!) because he was sick of playing for a lackluster team. "Sub-mediocre" is sometimes a generous description of the team's "prowess", never more so than [[EpicFail the infamous "imperfect record" (0–16) season in 2008]]. The curse is supposedly over now (since Layne said "they wouldn't win for 50 years" when departing for Pittsburgh), but even in their following playoff appearances (2011, 2014, 2016, all first round losses) they haven't really played like the Lions of old.
* Green Bay:
**
Green Bay was known as "NFL Siberia" from 1968, the year after Vince Lombardi retired as head coach, and 1992 when General Manager Ron Wolf brought in Mike Holmgren to coach, traded for Brett Favre, and signed Reggie White following the season. To give some perspective, they [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome won five championships in Lombardi's final seven years]] and made the playoffs six straight times after signing Reggie White, including two NFC titles and a Super Bowl.



* The Tampa Bay Buccaneers may be the kings of this trope in sports. Their image was cemented when they were winless for their entire inaugural season and almost all of the second, an NFL-record 26-game losing streak from 1976 to 1977. This was partially due to a horrendous rash of injuries, as they were not provided medical information on players prior to the expansion draft, but also largely due to coach John [=McKay=]'s decision to use younger players with potential, rather than older players who would be ready to retire by the time the team was good.
** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (brothers Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon, both rookie defensive linemen out of Oklahoma) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several other ex-USC players coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].
** Eventually, [=McKay=]'s youth-first strategy was successful: they made the playoffs in their fourth season, the quickest of any American major professional sports franchise to that point. But the 1982 players' strike divided the team and destroyed [=McKay=]'s enthusiasm for coaching. Then a series of unproductive drafts coincided with the veteran players' aging and the emergence of the USFL, so the team went very quickly from being a championship contender to the worst team in the league. They finished with losing records for each of the 14 seasons from 1983 to 1996, and their constant coaching turnover resulted also in a constant turnover of players, with nobody ever in place for long enough to finish the rebuilding job. This streak included selecting Bo Jackson with the first pick in the 1986 draft, only to see him refuse to sign with the team and instead sign a baseball contract; and trading a 1992 first-round pick (which became the second-overall pick in the draft) for Chris Chandler, who played for less than one full season with the team. It was not until Rich [=McKay=] and Tony Dungy improved the team's personnel selection and coaching in the mid-1990s that their situation improved.
** One bad draft that stands out was the 1982 draft, where the Bucs wanted to select [[http://www.si.com/longform/nfl-draft-82/ Booker Reese]], a super-athletic, yet extremely raw defensive end, with the 17th overall pick. A communications snafu led Tampa Bay to mistakenly use that pick on their second choice Sean Farrell, a talented and polished offensive tackle who ended up having a good NFL career. The Bucs, wanting to have their cake and eat it too, wanted to trade up for Reese in the second round, and were so desperate for a deal that they sent their first-round pick in the 1983 draft to Chicago for the rights to Reese. Reese was a huge, drug-addled bust in the pros, while the Bears used that pick (18th overall) to select Willie Gault, who had a successful pro career at wide receiver. Much worse, ''Dan Freaking Marino'' was still on the board at that time, and the Bucs needed a quarterback in the worst way possible.[[note]] Marino's draft prospects had taken a hit after a weak final year at the University of Pittsburgh and allegations of drug problems, but he was still regarded as a potential generational talent, and the Miami Dolphins used their first round pick (27th overall) to draft him.[[/note]]
* The Washington Redskins are enduring one right now, and have been ever since [[ExecutiveMeddling executive meddler extraordinaire]] Daniel [[TyrantTakesTheHelm Snyder]] took over. Despite being the most profitable team in the league, the team has perennially underperformed due to Snyder's interference: the team has had seven head coaches in 12 years, posted a losing record through 2000–10 (86–106) and has constantly favored flashy style over substance on the field. Moreover, Snyder's moneygrubbing and intolerance of dissent has ''definitely'' rubbed fans the wrong way; Washington fans are the only fans in the nation charged to see their team in preseason, and since 2009 banned all signs from the stadium. Many Redskins fans eagerly await Snyder's departure, to put it lightly. It's gotten much worse eventually with the controversy over the team's name being offensive. Even longtime Redskins fans are now turning against the team and its institution for its refusal to change anything at all with a negative connotation towards American Indians. By 2016, once-unheralded Kirk Cousins had stepped up as an elite quarterback and erased bad memories of two horrible seasons and onetime potential Hall of Famer Robert Griffin III's injury- and attitude-fueled descent to mediocrity. Unfortunately for Redskins fans, Cousins' rise just meant the Redskins found an entirely new way to screw up: franchise-tagging Cousins twice instead of giving him a long-term deal, which resulted in him defecting in free agency to Minnesota after the 2017 season. The Redskins have replaced him with Alex Smith, who is at least a competent quarterback, but the trade cost the team a draft pick, a promising young cornerback, and a large extension for Smith that's probably not much smaller than the long-term deal they could have given Cousins after the 2016 season.
** And ''then'', midway through the 2018 season, Smith [[GameBreakingInjury broke his leg in a gruesome manner similar to Joe Theismann.]] This probably cost the Redskins a playoff berth, and with Smith's playing status unlikely for 2019 forced a trade for middling veteran Case Keenum. The team just ''cannot'' catch a break.
* The NFL's St. Louis/Los Angeles Rams' downward spiral.

to:

* The Tampa Bay Buccaneers may be the kings of this trope Los Angeles (formerly San Diego) Chargers were in sports. Their image was cemented when a Dork Age from 1996 through 2003, where they were winless for their entire inaugural season and almost all of the second, an NFL-record 26-game losing streak from 1976 failed to 1977. This was partially due to a horrendous rash of injuries, as they were not provided medical information on players prior to the expansion draft, but also largely due to coach John [=McKay=]'s decision to use younger players with potential, rather than older players who would be ready to retire by the time the team was good.
** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (brothers Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon, both rookie defensive linemen out of Oklahoma) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several other ex-USC players coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].
** Eventually, [=McKay=]'s youth-first strategy was successful: they made
make the playoffs in and never won more than half of their fourth season, the quickest of any American major professional sports franchise to that point. But the 1982 players' strike divided the team games. The Ryan Leaf era (1998 and destroyed [=McKay=]'s enthusiasm for coaching. Then 2000) deserves a series of unproductive drafts coincided with the veteran players' aging special mention, as he threw more interceptions than touchdowns and the emergence became one of the USFL, so the team went very quickly from being a championship contender to the worst team in the league. They finished with losing records for each of the 14 seasons from 1983 to 1996, and their constant coaching turnover resulted also in a constant turnover of players, with nobody ever in place for long enough to finish the rebuilding job. This streak included selecting Bo Jackson with the first pick in the 1986 draft, only to see him refuse to sign with the team and instead sign a baseball contract; and trading a 1992 first-round pick (which became the second-overall pick in the draft) for Chris Chandler, who played for less than one full season with the team. It was not until Rich [=McKay=] and Tony Dungy improved the team's personnel selection and coaching in the mid-1990s that their situation improved.
** One bad
draft that stands out was picks of all time. Leaf's 2000 campaign saw the 1982 draft, where the Bucs wanted to select [[http://www.si.com/longform/nfl-draft-82/ Booker Reese]], a super-athletic, yet extremely raw defensive end, with the 17th overall pick. A communications snafu led Tampa Bay to mistakenly use that pick on their second choice Sean Farrell, a talented and polished offensive tackle who ended up having a good NFL career. The Bucs, wanting to have their cake and eat it too, wanted to trade up for Reese in the second round, and were so desperate for a deal that Chargers go 1-15, they sent their first-round pick in the 1983 draft to Chicago for the rights to Reese. Reese was a huge, drug-addled bust in the pros, while the Bears used that pick (18th overall) to select Willie Gault, who had a successful pro career at wide receiver. Much worse, ''Dan Freaking Marino'' was still on the board at that time, and the Bucs needed a quarterback in the worst way possible.[[note]] Marino's draft prospects had taken a hit after a weak final year at the University of Pittsburgh and allegations of drug problems, but he was still regarded as a potential generational talent, and the Miami Dolphins used their first round pick (27th overall) to draft him.[[/note]]
* The Washington Redskins are enduring one right now, and have been ever since [[ExecutiveMeddling executive meddler extraordinaire]] Daniel [[TyrantTakesTheHelm Snyder]] took over. Despite being the most profitable team in the league, the team has perennially underperformed due to Snyder's interference: the team has had seven head coaches in 12 years, posted a losing record through 2000–10 (86–106) and has constantly favored flashy style over substance on the field. Moreover, Snyder's moneygrubbing and intolerance of dissent has ''definitely'' rubbed fans the wrong way; Washington fans are the only fans in the nation charged to see their team in preseason, and since 2009 banned all signs from the stadium. Many Redskins fans eagerly await Snyder's departure, to put it lightly. It's gotten much worse eventually with the controversy over the team's name being offensive. Even longtime Redskins fans are now turning against the team and its institution for its refusal to change anything at all with a negative connotation towards American Indians. By 2016, once-unheralded Kirk Cousins had stepped up as an elite quarterback and erased bad memories of two horrible seasons and onetime potential Hall of Famer Robert Griffin III's injury- and attitude-fueled descent to mediocrity. Unfortunately for Redskins fans, Cousins' rise just meant the Redskins found an entirely new way to screw up: franchise-tagging Cousins twice instead of giving him a long-term deal, which resulted in him defecting in free agency to Minnesota after the 2017 season. The Redskins have
replaced him with Alex Smith, who is Drew Brees at least a competent quarterback, but and the trade cost the team a draft pick, a promising young cornerback, and a large extension for Smith that's probably not much smaller than the long-term deal rest is history. And they could have given Cousins left San Diego for their original home of Los Angeles after the 2016 season.
** And ''then'', midway through the 2018 season, Smith [[GameBreakingInjury broke his leg in a gruesome manner similar to Joe Theismann.]] This probably cost the Redskins a playoff berth, and with Smith's playing status unlikely for 2019 forced a trade for middling veteran Case Keenum. The team just ''cannot'' catch a break.
season.
* The NFL's St. Louis/Los Los Angeles Rams' downward spiral.(formerly St. Louis) Rams:



* Miami Dolphins:
** The entire Jimmy Johnson era and legacy is in turn a dork age for the Dolphins. Johnson's insistence that it would be his team, built his way, meant clashes with Marino (particularly over Johnson's attempts to trade him), the team's best player; and Johnson used high picks on running backs such as John Avery and James Johnson (no relation), who ended up as role players at best. And he brought in Cecil "the Diesel" Collins, who went to prison for probation violations before even playing a season (he was only a fifth-round pick, but the embarrassment was still strong). Johnson resigned in 1999, and hand-selected Wannstedt as his successor, and the Dolphins have been ordinary (at best) ever since.
** If that was bad, however, their 2007 season, with Cam Cameron behind the wheel, was even worse. They were literally a hair away from going 0-16 the year before Detroit did, and managed to eke out one win, in being in Week 15 against the Baltimore Ravens in overtime. He was thankfully fired once the disaster of a season was through, but since then they've only had winning seasons twice (2008 and 2016), and both times would lose in the Wild Card round of the playoffs.
* New York Giants:
** The giants have had great success in multiple eras -- the late-'50s and early-'60s with Y.A. Tittle, Frank Gifford, and Sam Huff, the mid-'80s to early-'90s with Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor, and, in subsequent years, their two Eli Manning-led Super Bowl teams. But they've also had about just as many Dork Ages.
** The first Dork Age of Giants football came in 1946, when star quarterback Frank Filchock and fullback Merle Hapes were banned from the NFL for their roles in a betting scandal, where a gambler allegedly paid them off to fix the 1946 championship against the Chicago Bears. Post-betting scandal, the Giants dropped from 7–3–1 in 1946 to 2–8–2 in 1947, and didn't recover until QB Charlie Conerly's rise to stardom in the early '50s.
** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime [=QBs=] Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik (he of the infamous fumble that led to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_at_the_Meadowlands Miracle at the Meadowlands]]) at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
** After winning Super Bowl XXV, the rough, gruff, yet brilliant and successful Bill Parcells retired from football, with his head coaching job going to Ray Handley. One of his first moves was to have a gimpy, yet still capable Simms battle it out for starting QB with Super Bowl XXV hero Jeff Hostetler, who was a capable fill-in, but not franchise QB material. And while he seemed at first to be a nicer guy than Parcells, media, and ultimately players, didn't see him that way, as he refused to take accountability for the Giants' descent "from the Super Bowl to the toilet bowl". Handley was gone after going 14-18 in two seasons (1991-92), and while Dan Reeves led the Giants to an 11-5 record in 1993, the team turned over the QB reins to the disappointing Dave Brown in 1994. And Danny Kanell in 1997 when Brown wasn't cutting it. And while their record under those two [=QBs=] (a combined 38-41-1) isn't ''that'' bad, it can be said that the Giants achieved such a record despite, and not because of, their quarterbacks.
* The New York Jets went through this from the 1994 to the 1996 seasons, which started with the Fake Spike Game between the Dolphins and Jets, that resulted in them losing their last four games and the firing of Pete Carroll. The following season, the Jets hired Rich Kotite as the new head coach and general manager. Kotite notoriously passed up highly-touted defensive tackle Warren Sapp for tight end Kyle Brady in the 1995 draft, despite the Jets already drafting one three years ago. During Kotite's tenure, the Jets finished 3–13 and 1–15, and eventually, Kotite resigned at the end of the season.
* After years of success in Oakland and Los Angeles, the Oakland Raiders entered a Dork Age after their 2003 curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII (Who were led by Jon Gruden, the head coach Al Davis practically gave away with contempt). Since then, their playoff drought lasted until 2016, and they only finished better than 5-11 four times, in 2010 and 2011 with 8–8 records, 2015 at 7–9, and 2016 with a 12-4 record. All but the most apologetic NFL fans point to Al Davis' waning health and mental capabilities late in life, and his stubborn refusal step down as General Manager. Some fans think it actually started with Davis' falling out and eventual acrimonious split with running back Marcus Allen in 1993 (Allen left as a free agent and signed with the Raiders' bitter rival, Kansas City). Things have started to turn around with Davis' son, Mark Davis, in control.



* When it comes to the Dork Age of Sports, Who Dey! Who Dey! Who Dey think gonna beat dem Cincinnati Bengals?! 25 years without a playoff win. Seven playoff games = seven embarrassing losses; the last five, in a franchise-record playoffs streak from 2011–15, resulted in an NFL record for consecutive first round losses, including two squandered division titles (2013, 2015). A Who's Who List of Draft Busts and Questionable-at-Best Free Agent Pickups. A scouting department and coaching staffs full of {{yes m|an}}en. A tortured fanbase ''foaming at the mouth'' for a better team. And the one constant string-puller in the last two decades of debacles? Mike Brown.
* After years of success in Oakland and Los Angeles, the Oakland Raiders entered a Dork Age after their 2003 curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII (Who were led by Jon Gruden, the head coach Al Davis practically gave away with contempt). Since then, their playoff drought lasted until 2016, and they only finished better than 5-11 four times, in 2010 and 2011 with 8–8 records, 2015 at 7–9, and 2016 with a 12-4 record. All but the most apologetic NFL fans point to Al Davis' waning health and mental capabilities late in life, and his stubborn refusal step down as General Manager. Some fans think it actually started with Davis' falling out and eventual acrimonious split with running back Marcus Allen in 1993 (Allen left as a free agent and signed with the Raiders' bitter rival, Kansas City). Things have started to turn around with Davis' son, Mark Davis, in control.
* The Detroit Lions fell into a long, mostly uninterrupted Dork Age since "The Curse of Bobby Layne" set in in 1958. Before this point, they had four NFL championships, including three in six seasons. Since then, the team has accumulated twelve total playoff games, one total playoff win (in 1991), zero Super Bowl appearances (the only franchise in the NFC as of 2017) and the worst overall winning percentage of any team in the NFL. Barry Sanders, the team's longtime running back, retired before the 1999 season (at the top of his game!) because he was sick of playing for a lackluster team. "Sub-mediocre" is sometimes a generous description of the team's "prowess", never more so than [[EpicFail the infamous "imperfect record" (0–16) season in 2008]]. The curse is supposedly over now (since Layne said "they wouldn't win for 50 years" when departing for Pittsburgh), but even in their following playoff appearances (2011, 2014, 2016, all first round losses) they haven't really played like the Lions of old.
* The "new" Cleveland Browns.
** A once-successful franchise that was the home of legendary running back Jim Brown and a long history that included four NFL championships, and three titles when they were part of the All-America Football Conference before that league folded and the Browns jumped to the NFL itself. Though they never won a championship in the "Super Bowl" era (1967 to present) they did have 14 playoff appearances and were, at worst, a respectable team. Then, in 1995, owner Art Modell controversially uprooted the franchise and moved them to Baltimore. The city of Cleveland filed a lawsuit and were allowed to hold on to the Browns name and history, in hopes of one day returning to play under a new franchise, which they were eventually awarded, and after a three-year hiatus, the Browns returned to the NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Since then, they've been a disaster, posting a 88–216 record through the 2017 season. They have had only two winning seasons (2002, 2007), and only made the playoffs once as a wild card team. The reason for the continued ineptitude are multiple, and include a revolving-door at both the head coach and Quarterback positions they can never seem to fix, years of bad draft picks, injuries, and embarrassing legal problems with the ownership. Playing in a tough division opposite Baltimore, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh hasn't helped, either. To add salt to the wound, the "old" Cleveland Browns (now Baltimore Ravens) have since won two Super Bowls, while the "new" Browns are widely viewed as the league's ButtMonkey franchise.
** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johnny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2018 season, the team has had 30 starting quarterbacks in 20 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had ''five'' starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Creator/TomBrady, Brady fill-ins Matt Cassel and Jimmy Garoppolo, plus Jacoby Brissett, who filled in when Garoppolo was hurt and Brady suspended for Deflategate -- over the same period of time. And given the woes of all starting Quarterbacks since then "draft bust" Tim Couch (who was not worth a first overall pick, granted, but he was not ''that'' bad) starts to look pretty good for a Browns QB. That said, it does look like 2018 top pick Baker Mayfield, who took over as the starter in Week 3, is the real deal, seeing that he led the Browns to 7 wins, more than they had in the previous three seasons combined. Though you never know with the Browns...
** Entering the 2019 season, the quarterback who has won the most regular-season games in Cleveland since the Browns returned to the league is Ben Roethlisberger. Who has spent his entire NFL career with the ''Steelers''.
** The "new" Browns went on to share NFL infamy with the 2008 Lions in 2017, when they cratered all the way to 0-16. Any hope of improvement was dashed, however, when coach Hue Jackson, who has gone 1-31 since taking the helm of the team in 2016, was retained for a third year.[[note]]At least until he was fired after their week 8 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.[[/note]] That, combined with the fact that the current owner (since 2012), Pilot Flying J head Jimmy Haslam, seems more concerned with lining his pockets and/or trying to keep his truck stop chain afloat[[note]]he was raided by an IRS/FBI joint strike team at one point![[/note]] than building a good front office, has led many a Browns fan to consider the current state of the Lions[[note]]an occasional playoff entrant with a capable QB, a few other good pieces and enough holes for any other playoff-caliber team to drive a tractor-trailer through[[/note]] a wistful fantasy.
* The New York Jets went through this from the 1994 to the 1996 seasons, which started with the Fake Spike Game between the Dolphins and Jets, that resulted in them losing their last four games and the firing of Pete Carroll. The following season, the Jets hired Rich Kotite as the new head coach and general manager. Kotite notoriously passed up highly-touted defensive tackle Warren Sapp for tight end Kyle Brady in the 1995 draft, despite the Jets already drafting one three years ago. During Kotite's tenure, the Jets finished 3–13 and 1–15, and eventually, Kotite resigned at the end of the season.
* Nine of the ten American Football League teams have points of pride they can point to from the league's ten-year history. Six of the original eight (Houston, Dallas/Kansas City, San Diego, Buffalo, Oakland, New York) won championships, Boston (now New England) had a Championship appearance in 1963 and sported several future Hall-of-Famers, Miami was the first AFL expansion team and brought pro football to Florida, and Cincinnati brought Paul Brown back to pro football. And then there's the Denver Broncos, who were the league's perennial doormat. The only team of the original eight to never post a winning season, they also had the additional stigma of sporting one of the [[http://blog.heritagesportsart.com/2010/08/denver-broncos-uniform-and-team-history.html all-time ugliest uniforms in all of pro sports]] for their first three years. Broncos fans tend not to EVER bring up their AFL years, though things did get much better post-NFL/AFL merger, with the "Orange Crush" defense driving the Broncos' success in the '70s, and John Elway leading the team to more success in the '80s and '90s.
* The New York Giants have had great success in multiple eras -- the late-'50s and early-'60s with Y.A. Tittle, Frank Gifford, and Sam Huff, the mid-'80s to early-'90s with Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor, and, in subsequent years, their two Eli Manning-led Super Bowl teams. But they've also had about just as many Dork Ages.
** The first Dork Age of Giants football came in 1946, when star quarterback Frank Filchock and fullback Merle Hapes were banned from the NFL for their roles in a betting scandal, where a gambler allegedly paid them off to fix the 1946 championship against the Chicago Bears. Post-betting scandal, the Giants dropped from 7–3–1 in 1946 to 2–8–2 in 1947, and didn't recover until QB Charlie Conerly's rise to stardom in the early '50s.
** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime [=QBs=] Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik (he of the infamous fumble that led to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_at_the_Meadowlands Miracle at the Meadowlands]]) at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
** After winning Super Bowl XXV, the rough, gruff, yet brilliant and successful Bill Parcells retired from football, with his head coaching job going to Ray Handley. One of his first moves was to have a gimpy, yet still capable Simms battle it out for starting QB with Super Bowl XXV hero Jeff Hostetler, who was a capable fill-in, but not franchise QB material. And while he seemed at first to be a nicer guy than Parcells, media, and ultimately players, didn't see him that way, as he refused to take accountability for the Giants' descent "from the Super Bowl to the toilet bowl". Handley was gone after going 14-18 in two seasons (1991-92), and while Dan Reeves led the Giants to an 11-5 record in 1993, the team turned over the QB reins to the disappointing Dave Brown in 1994. And Danny Kanell in 1997 when Brown wasn't cutting it. And while their record under those two [=QBs=] (a combined 38-41-1) isn't ''that'' bad, it can be said that the Giants achieved such a record despite, and not because of, their quarterbacks.
* The San Francisco 49ers had great periods in their history such as the "Million-Dollar Backfield" era of the 50's and the Montana/Rice/Young era of the 80's and the 90's, but they had two significant lean periods in their history.

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* When it comes to the Dork Age of Sports, Who Dey! Who Dey! Who Dey think gonna beat dem Cincinnati Bengals?! 25 years without a playoff win. Seven playoff games = seven embarrassing losses; the last five, in a franchise-record playoffs streak from 2011–15, resulted in an NFL record for consecutive first round losses, including two squandered division titles (2013, 2015). A Who's Who List of Draft Busts and Questionable-at-Best Free Agent Pickups. A scouting department and coaching staffs full of {{yes m|an}}en. A tortured fanbase ''foaming at the mouth'' for a better team. And the one constant string-puller in the last two decades of debacles? Mike Brown.
* After years of success in Oakland and Los Angeles, the Oakland Raiders entered a Dork Age after their 2003 curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII (Who were led by Jon Gruden, the head coach Al Davis practically gave away with contempt). Since then, their playoff drought lasted until 2016, and they only finished better than 5-11 four times, in 2010 and 2011 with 8–8 records, 2015 at 7–9, and 2016 with a 12-4 record. All but the most apologetic NFL fans point to Al Davis' waning health and mental capabilities late in life, and his stubborn refusal step down as General Manager. Some fans think it actually started with Davis' falling out and eventual acrimonious split with running back Marcus Allen in 1993 (Allen left as a free agent and signed with the Raiders' bitter rival, Kansas City). Things have started to turn around with Davis' son, Mark Davis, in control.
* The Detroit Lions fell into a long, mostly uninterrupted Dork Age since "The Curse of Bobby Layne" set in in 1958. Before this point, they had four NFL championships, including three in six seasons. Since then, the team has accumulated twelve total playoff games, one total playoff win (in 1991), zero Super Bowl appearances (the only franchise in the NFC as of 2017) and the worst overall winning percentage of any team in the NFL. Barry Sanders, the team's longtime running back, retired before the 1999 season (at the top of his game!) because he was sick of playing for a lackluster team. "Sub-mediocre" is sometimes a generous description of the team's "prowess", never more so than [[EpicFail the infamous "imperfect record" (0–16) season in 2008]]. The curse is supposedly over now (since Layne said "they wouldn't win for 50 years" when departing for Pittsburgh), but even in their following playoff appearances (2011, 2014, 2016, all first round losses) they haven't really played like the Lions of old.
* The "new" Cleveland Browns.
** A once-successful franchise that was the home of legendary running back Jim Brown and a long history that included four NFL championships, and three titles when they were part of the All-America Football Conference before that league folded and the Browns jumped to the NFL itself. Though they never won a championship in the "Super Bowl" era (1967 to present) they did have 14 playoff appearances and were, at worst, a respectable team. Then, in 1995, owner Art Modell controversially uprooted the franchise and moved them to Baltimore. The city of Cleveland filed a lawsuit and were allowed to hold on to the Browns name and history, in hopes of one day returning to play under a new franchise, which they were eventually awarded, and after a three-year hiatus, the Browns returned to the NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Since then, they've been a disaster, posting a 88–216 record through the 2017 season. They have had only two winning seasons (2002, 2007), and only made the playoffs once as a wild card team. The reason for the continued ineptitude are multiple, and include a revolving-door at both the head coach and Quarterback positions they can never seem to fix, years of bad draft picks, injuries, and embarrassing legal problems with the ownership. Playing in a tough division opposite Baltimore, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh hasn't helped, either. To add salt to the wound, the "old" Cleveland Browns (now Baltimore Ravens) have since won two Super Bowls, while the "new" Browns are widely viewed as the league's ButtMonkey franchise.
** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johnny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2018 season, the team has had 30 starting quarterbacks in 20 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had ''five'' starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Creator/TomBrady, Brady fill-ins Matt Cassel and Jimmy Garoppolo, plus Jacoby Brissett, who filled in when Garoppolo was hurt and Brady suspended for Deflategate -- over the same period of time. And given the woes of all starting Quarterbacks since then "draft bust" Tim Couch (who was not worth a first overall pick, granted, but he was not ''that'' bad) starts to look pretty good for a Browns QB. That said, it does look like 2018 top pick Baker Mayfield, who took over as the starter in Week 3, is the real deal, seeing that he led the Browns to 7 wins, more than they had in the previous three seasons combined. Though you never know with the Browns...
** Entering the 2019 season, the quarterback who has won the most regular-season games in Cleveland since the Browns returned to the league is Ben Roethlisberger. Who has spent his entire NFL career with the ''Steelers''.
** The "new" Browns went on to share NFL infamy with the 2008 Lions in 2017, when they cratered all the way to 0-16. Any hope of improvement was dashed, however, when coach Hue Jackson, who has gone 1-31 since taking the helm of the team in 2016, was retained for a third year.[[note]]At least until he was fired after their week 8 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.[[/note]] That, combined with the fact that the current owner (since 2012), Pilot Flying J head Jimmy Haslam, seems more concerned with lining his pockets and/or trying to keep his truck stop chain afloat[[note]]he was raided by an IRS/FBI joint strike team at one point![[/note]] than building a good front office, has led many a Browns fan to consider the current state of the Lions[[note]]an occasional playoff entrant with a capable QB, a few other good pieces and enough holes for any other playoff-caliber team to drive a tractor-trailer through[[/note]] a wistful fantasy.
* The New York Jets went through this from the 1994 to the 1996 seasons, which started with the Fake Spike Game between the Dolphins and Jets, that resulted in them losing their last four games and the firing of Pete Carroll. The following season, the Jets hired Rich Kotite as the new head coach and general manager. Kotite notoriously passed up highly-touted defensive tackle Warren Sapp for tight end Kyle Brady in the 1995 draft, despite the Jets already drafting one three years ago. During Kotite's tenure, the Jets finished 3–13 and 1–15, and eventually, Kotite resigned at the end of the season.
* Nine of the ten American Football League teams have points of pride they can point to from the league's ten-year history. Six of the original eight (Houston, Dallas/Kansas City, San Diego, Buffalo, Oakland, New York) won championships, Boston (now New England) had a Championship appearance in 1963 and sported several future Hall-of-Famers, Miami was the first AFL expansion team and brought pro football to Florida, and Cincinnati brought Paul Brown back to pro football. And then there's the Denver Broncos, who were the league's perennial doormat. The only team of the original eight to never post a winning season, they also had the additional stigma of sporting one of the [[http://blog.heritagesportsart.com/2010/08/denver-broncos-uniform-and-team-history.html all-time ugliest uniforms in all of pro sports]] for their first three years. Broncos fans tend not to EVER bring up their AFL years, though things did get much better post-NFL/AFL merger, with the "Orange Crush" defense driving the Broncos' success in the '70s, and John Elway leading the team to more success in the '80s and '90s.
* The New York Giants have had great success in multiple eras -- the late-'50s and early-'60s with Y.A. Tittle, Frank Gifford, and Sam Huff, the mid-'80s to early-'90s with Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor, and, in subsequent years, their two Eli Manning-led Super Bowl teams. But they've also had about just as many Dork Ages.
** The first Dork Age of Giants football came in 1946, when star quarterback Frank Filchock and fullback Merle Hapes were banned from the NFL for their roles in a betting scandal, where a gambler allegedly paid them off to fix the 1946 championship against the Chicago Bears. Post-betting scandal, the Giants dropped from 7–3–1 in 1946 to 2–8–2 in 1947, and didn't recover until QB Charlie Conerly's rise to stardom in the early '50s.
** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime [=QBs=] Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik (he of the infamous fumble that led to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_at_the_Meadowlands Miracle at the Meadowlands]]) at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
** After winning Super Bowl XXV, the rough, gruff, yet brilliant and successful Bill Parcells retired from football, with his head coaching job going to Ray Handley. One of his first moves was to have a gimpy, yet still capable Simms battle it out for starting QB with Super Bowl XXV hero Jeff Hostetler, who was a capable fill-in, but not franchise QB material. And while he seemed at first to be a nicer guy than Parcells, media, and ultimately players, didn't see him that way, as he refused to take accountability for the Giants' descent "from the Super Bowl to the toilet bowl". Handley was gone after going 14-18 in two seasons (1991-92), and while Dan Reeves led the Giants to an 11-5 record in 1993, the team turned over the QB reins to the disappointing Dave Brown in 1994. And Danny Kanell in 1997 when Brown wasn't cutting it. And while their record under those two [=QBs=] (a combined 38-41-1) isn't ''that'' bad, it can be said that the Giants achieved such a record despite, and not because of, their quarterbacks.
* The
San Francisco 49ers had great periods in their history such as the "Million-Dollar Backfield" era of the 50's and the Montana/Rice/Young era of the 80's and the 90's, but they had two significant lean periods in their history.49ers:


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* Tampa Bay Buccaneers:
** The Bucs may be the kings of this trope in sports. Their image was cemented when they were winless for their entire inaugural season and almost all of the second, an NFL-record 26-game losing streak from 1976 to 1977. This was partially due to a horrendous rash of injuries, as they were not provided medical information on players prior to the expansion draft, but also largely due to coach John [=McKay=]'s decision to use younger players with potential, rather than older players who would be ready to retire by the time the team was good.
** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (brothers Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon, both rookie defensive linemen out of Oklahoma) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several other ex-USC players coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].
** Eventually, [=McKay=]'s youth-first strategy was successful: they made the playoffs in their fourth season, the quickest of any American major professional sports franchise to that point. But the 1982 players' strike divided the team and destroyed [=McKay=]'s enthusiasm for coaching. Then a series of unproductive drafts coincided with the veteran players' aging and the emergence of the USFL, so the team went very quickly from being a championship contender to the worst team in the league. They finished with losing records for each of the 14 seasons from 1983 to 1996, and their constant coaching turnover resulted also in a constant turnover of players, with nobody ever in place for long enough to finish the rebuilding job. This streak included selecting Bo Jackson with the first pick in the 1986 draft, only to see him refuse to sign with the team and instead sign a baseball contract; and trading a 1992 first-round pick (which became the second-overall pick in the draft) for Chris Chandler, who played for less than one full season with the team. It was not until Rich [=McKay=] and Tony Dungy improved the team's personnel selection and coaching in the mid-1990s that their situation improved.
** One bad draft that stands out was the 1982 draft, where the Bucs wanted to select [[http://www.si.com/longform/nfl-draft-82/ Booker Reese]], a super-athletic, yet extremely raw defensive end, with the 17th overall pick. A communications snafu led Tampa Bay to mistakenly use that pick on their second choice Sean Farrell, a talented and polished offensive tackle who ended up having a good NFL career. The Bucs, wanting to have their cake and eat it too, wanted to trade up for Reese in the second round, and were so desperate for a deal that they sent their first-round pick in the 1983 draft to Chicago for the rights to Reese. Reese was a huge, drug-addled bust in the pros, while the Bears used that pick (18th overall) to select Willie Gault, who had a successful pro career at wide receiver. Much worse, ''Dan Freaking Marino'' was still on the board at that time, and the Bucs needed a quarterback in the worst way possible.[[note]] Marino's draft prospects had taken a hit after a weak final year at the University of Pittsburgh and allegations of drug problems, but he was still regarded as a potential generational talent, and the Miami Dolphins used their first round pick (27th overall) to draft him.[[/note]]
* Washington Redskins:
** The Redskins are enduring one right now, and have been ever since [[ExecutiveMeddling executive meddler extraordinaire]] Daniel [[TyrantTakesTheHelm Snyder]] took over. Despite being the most profitable team in the league, the team has perennially underperformed due to Snyder's interference: the team has had seven head coaches in 12 years, posted a losing record through 2000–10 (86–106) and has constantly favored flashy style over substance on the field. Moreover, Snyder's moneygrubbing and intolerance of dissent has ''definitely'' rubbed fans the wrong way; Washington fans are the only fans in the nation charged to see their team in preseason, and since 2009 banned all signs from the stadium. Many Redskins fans eagerly await Snyder's departure, to put it lightly. It's gotten much worse eventually with the controversy over the team's name being offensive. Even longtime Redskins fans are now turning against the team and its institution for its refusal to change anything at all with a negative connotation towards American Indians. By 2016, once-unheralded Kirk Cousins had stepped up as an elite quarterback and erased bad memories of two horrible seasons and onetime potential Hall of Famer Robert Griffin III's injury- and attitude-fueled descent to mediocrity. Unfortunately for Redskins fans, Cousins' rise just meant the Redskins found an entirely new way to screw up: franchise-tagging Cousins twice instead of giving him a long-term deal, which resulted in him defecting in free agency to Minnesota after the 2017 season. The Redskins have replaced him with Alex Smith, who is at least a competent quarterback, but the trade cost the team a draft pick, a promising young cornerback, and a large extension for Smith that's probably not much smaller than the long-term deal they could have given Cousins after the 2016 season.
** And ''then'', midway through the 2018 season, Smith [[GameBreakingInjury broke his leg in a gruesome manner similar to Joe Theismann.]] This probably cost the Redskins a playoff berth, and with Smith's playing status unlikely for 2019 forced a trade for middling veteran Case Keenum. The team just ''cannot'' catch a break.


* In a similar vein to most fans' reactions to NBA's 90's screen fever, most times when NBA teams strays from their traditional colors and/or look are seen as a stylistic DorkAge by said teams' fans. Perhaps fittingly, many of the most controversial changes started or occurred during The90s.
** In 1996, the Detroit Pistons switched their primary colors from the Blue and Red of the Bad Boys era to a Teal and Burgundy combination that was loathed by the fanbase. Pistons fans derisively refer to this era (1996-2001) as the "Teal Era".
** The Golden State Warriors underwent a drastic style change after being purchased by Chris Cohan in 1997, abandoning the Blue and Yellow they had worn since they moved to the Bay and utilizing an Orange and Navy Blue color scheme. Many Dubs fans were resistant to the change, although said resistance may have been tied to the team's constant struggles during Cohan's ownership. Unsurprisingly, fans cheered when new owner Joe Lacob announced the return of Blue and Yellow in 2010 [[note]] The Warriors' improved fortunes after the return of the new colors probably helped as well [[/note]]. That being said, the second iteration (worn from 2001-2010) of the Orange-and-Navy jerseys (nicknamed the "We Believe" Jerseys due to their association with the Dubs' upset of the Mavericks in the 2007 playoffs) [[NostalgiaFilter has been viewed more favorably among the fanbase]]; so much so that a more-successful Warriors team revived said jerseys during Golden State's last game at Oracle Arena. [[note]] The first iteration (1997-2001) has less fans, in part due to a gaudy, thunderbolt-filled design that just screams "Screen Fever" [[/note]].

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* In a similar vein to most fans' reactions to NBA's 90's screen fever, most times when NBA teams strays from their traditional colors and/or look are seen as a stylistic DorkAge by said teams' fans.fans [[note]] Those redesigns might be viewed with nostalgia as time passes though, particularly if the team was successful during the times they wore those colors [[/note]]. Perhaps fittingly, many of the most controversial changes started or occurred during The90s.
** In 1996, the Detroit Pistons switched their primary colors from the Blue and Red of the Bad Boys era to a Teal and Burgundy combination that was loathed by the fanbase. And that's not even getting into the very gaudy logo that Detroit used at that time. Pistons fans derisively refer to this era (1996-2001) as the "Teal Era".
** The Golden State Warriors underwent a drastic style change after being purchased by Chris Cohan in 1997, abandoning the Blue and Yellow they had worn since they moved to the Bay and utilizing an Orange and Navy Blue color scheme. Many Dubs fans were resistant to the change, although said resistance may have been tied to the team's constant struggles during Cohan's ownership. Unsurprisingly, fans cheered when new owner Joe Lacob announced the return of Blue and Yellow in 2010 [[note]] The Warriors' improved fortunes after the return of the new colors probably helped as well well [[/note]]. That being said, the second iteration (worn from 2001-2010) of the Orange-and-Navy jerseys (nicknamed the "We Believe" Jerseys due to their association with the Dubs' upset of the Mavericks in the 2007 playoffs) [[NostalgiaFilter has been viewed more favorably among the fanbase]]; so much so that a more-successful the Warriors team revived said jerseys during Golden State's last game at Oracle Arena. [[note]] The first iteration (1997-2001) has less fans, in part due to a gaudy, thunderbolt-filled design that just screams "Screen Fever" [[/note]].[[/note]].
** After their 1995 Championship, the Houston Rockets replaced the plain red, white, and yellow look that the team sported during most of their history with an drastically different Red and Dark Gray aesthetic that featured weirdly pinstriped Jerseys and a logo that featured a snarling cartoon rocket. Fans didn't miss that look very much after the team introduced a more stylish red and white look during the Yao Ming era.
** Fans of the Utah Jazz had endlessly debated over the Jazz's decision in 1996 to abandon the music note logo that they had worn since the very beginning in favor of a logo that emphasized the Wasatch mountain range. Supporters of the logo change note that the many iterations of the "Mountain" logo are more emblematic of Utah, while opponents have bemoaned that said logos had no "Jazz" elements in them. Perhaps in response, the Jazz returned to using the Music note logo in their Jerseys in 2010, before completely abandoning the Mountain logo and making the Music note the primary logo in 2016.
** Cleveland Cavaliers fans weren't too keen on the team changing their colors from red and gold to orange and blue in 1983. The 1995 switch to black and light blue was received more poorly, in part due to the horrible uniforms that the Cavs wore during that time period. The return of red was celebrated in 2003, although the arrival of UsefulNotes/LebronJames may have played a factor into that.

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* In a similar vein to most fans' reactions to NBA's 90's screen fever, most times when NBA teams strays from their traditional colors and/or look are seen as a stylistic DorkAge by said teams' fans. Perhaps fittingly, many of the most controversial changes started or occurred during The90s.
** In 1996, the Detroit Pistons switched their primary colors from the Blue and Red of the Bad Boys era to a Teal and Burgundy combination that was loathed by the fanbase. Pistons fans derisively refer to this era (1996-2001) as the "Teal Era".
** The Golden State Warriors underwent a drastic style change after being purchased by Chris Cohan in 1997, abandoning the Blue and Yellow they had worn since they moved to the Bay and utilizing an Orange and Navy Blue color scheme. Many Dubs fans were resistant to the change, although said resistance may have been tied to the team's constant struggles during Cohan's ownership. Unsurprisingly, fans cheered when new owner Joe Lacob announced the return of Blue and Yellow in 2010 [[note]] The Warriors' improved fortunes after the return of the new colors probably helped as well [[/note]]. That being said, the second iteration (worn from 2001-2010) of the Orange-and-Navy jerseys (nicknamed the "We Believe" Jerseys due to their association with the Dubs' upset of the Mavericks in the 2007 playoffs) [[NostalgiaFilter has been viewed more favorably among the fanbase]]; so much so that a more-successful Warriors team revived said jerseys during Golden State's last game at Oracle Arena. [[note]] The first iteration (1997-2001) has less fans, in part due to a gaudy, thunderbolt-filled design that just screams "Screen Fever" [[/note]].


* Given that the Golden State Warriors have been [[TheAce the NBA's best]] (and most hated) team since the middle of TheNewTens, it's tough to remember that they were a complete joke from 1975 to 2015. The Warriors were actually a decent to good team during their early years (first in Philadelphia until 1962, then in the San Francisco Bay Area since then), boasting three Championships (in 1947 [[note]]The first ever NBA (then known as the BAA) championship[[/note]], 1956, and 1975), and NBA legends such as Joe Fulks, Al Attles, UsefulNotes/WiltChamberlain, and Rick Barry. In the years following the 1975 Championship, though, it was constant pain for Warriors fans, as the Dubs turned into one of the league's whipping boys thanks to constant playoff misses, bad draft choices (e.g. Joe Barry Carroll and Chris Washburn), and uninspired player transactions (the team let go of Robert Parish, who became a key member of the 80's Celtics' dynasty). There was some respite in the late 80's and early 90's, as the fast-paced Run TMC trio wowed fans with their [[FragileSpeedster lightning-fast play]] and [[GlassCannon high-octane offense]]. Unfortunately, the end of the Run TMC era ushered in an even darker period from 1994 to 2012 when the Dubs missed the playoffs every season except for a one-off cameo in 2007 (known as the "We Believe" Warriors). Despite some bright spots (the aforementioned "We Believe" team and their upset of the first-seed Mavericks, the presence of studs such as Antawn Jamison and Jason Richardson), that period was filled with crappy draft picks (Joe Smith over Kevin Garnett, Todd Fuller over Kobe Bryant etc.), poor personnel decisions ([[RichInDollarsPoorInSense huge contracts given to scrubs]] like Erick Dampier and Andris Biedriņš, signing past-their-prime players like Terry Cummings and John Starks), and several controversies ([[WhatTheHellHero Latrell Sprewell choking his coach]], Monta Ellis [[WhatAnIdiot getting into a moped accident]]). The Warriors fans' suffering would come to a close as the Warriors ended up getting a much-needed ownership change, while smartly using key draft picks (mostly earned from near-constant suckitude) on building blocks such as UsefulNotes/StephenCurry, [[ImprobableAimingSkills Klay]] [[NumberTwo Thompson]], and [[LightningBruiser Draymond]] [[BloodKnight Green]]. Such a transition ended up bringing the Dubs back into the playoffs in 2013, and a further coaching change reaped four NBA Finals appearances, three championships, an NBA record for regular-season wins, an NBA playoffs record, and Kevin Durant, ensuring that the stench of the Dubs' 40-year long Dork Age is pretty much dead and gone.

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* Given that the Golden State Warriors have been [[TheAce the NBA's best]] (and most hated) team since the middle of TheNewTens, it's tough to remember that they were a complete joke from 1975 to 2015. The Warriors were actually a decent to good team during their early years (first in Philadelphia until 1962, then in the San Francisco Bay Area since then), boasting three Championships (in 1947 [[note]]The first ever NBA (then known as the BAA) championship[[/note]], 1956, and 1975), and NBA legends such as Joe Fulks, Al Attles, UsefulNotes/WiltChamberlain, Nate Thurmond, and Rick Barry. In the years following the 1975 Championship, though, it was constant pain for Warriors fans, as the Dubs turned into one of the league's whipping boys thanks to constant playoff misses, bad draft choices (e.g. Joe Barry Carroll and Chris Washburn), and uninspired player transactions (the team let go of Robert Parish, who became a key member of the 80's Celtics' dynasty). There was some respite in the late 80's and early 90's, as the fast-paced Run TMC trio wowed fans with their [[FragileSpeedster lightning-fast play]] and [[GlassCannon high-octane offense]]. Unfortunately, the end of the Run TMC era ushered in an even darker period from 1994 to 2012 when the Dubs missed the playoffs every season except for a one-off cameo in 2007 (known as the "We Believe" Warriors). Despite some bright spots (the aforementioned "We Believe" team and their upset of the first-seed Mavericks, the presence of studs such as Antawn Jamison and Jason Richardson), that period was filled with crappy draft picks (Joe Smith over Kevin Garnett, Todd Fuller over Kobe Bryant etc.), poor personnel decisions ([[RichInDollarsPoorInSense huge contracts given to scrubs]] like Erick Dampier and Andris Biedriņš, signing past-their-prime players like Terry Cummings and John Starks), and several controversies ([[WhatTheHellHero Latrell Sprewell choking his coach]], Monta Ellis [[WhatAnIdiot getting into a moped accident]]). The Warriors fans' suffering would come to a close as the Warriors ended up getting a much-needed ownership change, while smartly using key draft picks (mostly earned from near-constant suckitude) on building blocks such as UsefulNotes/StephenCurry, [[ImprobableAimingSkills Klay]] [[NumberTwo Thompson]], and [[LightningBruiser Draymond]] [[BloodKnight Green]]. Such a transition ended up bringing the Dubs back into the playoffs in 2013, and a further coaching change reaped four NBA Finals appearances, three championships, an NBA record for regular-season wins, an NBA playoffs record, and Kevin Durant, ensuring that the stench of the Dubs' 40-year long Dork Age is pretty much dead and gone.



* The Portland Trailblazers' "Jail Blazer" era of the early to mid-2000's is considered to be this by Blazers fans. During that time, the Trailblazers played host to players with frequent off-the-court troubles such as Rasheed Wallace, Qyntel Woods, Ruben Patterson, and Damon Stoudamire. While the team remained successful at first, fans weren't receptive to the frequent legal troubles of the teams' stars.

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* The Portland Trailblazers' "Jail Blazer" era of the early to mid-2000's is considered to be this by Blazers fans. During that time, At the start of the "Jail Blazers" era, the Trailblazers played host to players with frequent off-the-court troubles such as Rasheed Wallace, Qyntel Woods, Zach Randolph, Darius Miles, Bonzi Wells, Ruben Patterson, and Damon Stoudamire. While the team remained successful at first, fans weren't receptive to the frequent legal troubles of the teams' stars. Portland attempted to improve the team's image by trading away the troublesome Wallace and Wells in 2003, but that only served to mire the Trailblazers in mediocrity while the on-and-off the court issues of the remaining "Jail Blazers" (e.g. Patterson, Randolph, Miles) continued to alienate fans. It wasn't until the latter part of the decade that Portland's fortunes improved; by that time, many of the "Jail Blazers" had left, and the Blazers would proceed to build around talented AND relatively trouble-free young stars such as LaMarcus Aldridge and Brandon Roy [[note]] That being said, the Blazers did commit one of the most infamous Draft day fuck-ups around that time, selecting Greg Oden over Kevin Durant in 2007 [[/note]] .


* The Philadelphia 76ers have had three distinctive [[DorkAge Dark Periods]] in their history, following mostly the same pattern (Sixers lose stars, try to rebuild, then build around new star player)

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* The Philadelphia 76ers have had three distinctive [[DorkAge Dark Periods]] in their history, following mostly the same pattern (Sixers lose stars, try to rebuild, then build around new succeed once they stumble upon a star player)


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* The Portland Trailblazers' "Jail Blazer" era of the early to mid-2000's is considered to be this by Blazers fans. During that time, the Trailblazers played host to players with frequent off-the-court troubles such as Rasheed Wallace, Qyntel Woods, Ruben Patterson, and Damon Stoudamire. While the team remained successful at first, fans weren't receptive to the frequent legal troubles of the teams' stars.


** After failed attempts to rebuild in the post-Iverson era left the Sixers as an Eastern Conference also-ran in the early NewTens, new Sixers GM Sam Hinkie proceeded to do the unthinkable and spent the 2013 offseason trading away star player Jrue Holiday and letting go of other key veterans, intending to build the 76ers from scratch with youth. Hinkie's plan was to have the team constantly struggling, while earning high draft picks as the result of said ineptitude. Unfortunately, the plan didn't quite work out as well at first, with the players obtained with said picks either hampered with injury issues (e.g. Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons) or ending up as relative disappointments (e.g. Jahlil Okafor, Nerlens Noel). The Sixers' lack of success, along with fans' frustration at having to watch a perennially lottery-bound team, led to Hinkie resigning in 2016. By that time, the fruits of Hinkie's labor ended up bearing fruit, as the highly-touted Embiid finally made his NBA debut TWO YEARS after getting drafted and proceeded to show All-star level talent that appeared to vindicate Hinkie's plan.

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** After failed attempts to rebuild in the post-Iverson era left the Sixers as an Eastern Conference also-ran in the early NewTens, new Sixers GM Sam Hinkie proceeded to do the unthinkable and spent the 2013 offseason trading away star player Jrue Holiday and letting go of other key veterans, intending to build the 76ers from scratch with youth. Hinkie's plan (nicknamed "The Process") was to have the team constantly struggling, while earning which would earn the Sixers high draft picks as that they would then use to draft a youthful and talented core of players for the result of said ineptitude. future. Unfortunately, the plan didn't quite work out as well at first, with 2014 draftee Joel Embiid and 2016 draftee Ben Simmons missing significant time due to injuries (Embiid missed his first two seasons, while Simmons missed his rookie season), while the players obtained with said other picks either hampered with injury issues (e.g. Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons) or ending (Nerlens Noel, Michael Carter Williams, Jahlil Okafor, Markelle Fultz) wound up as relative disappointments (e.g. Jahlil Okafor, Nerlens Noel). disappointments. The Sixers' continued ineptitude and lack of success, along with fans' frustration at having to watch a perennially lottery-bound team, progress led many to Hinkie resigning in 2016. By believe at that time, the fruits of time that "The Process" was a failure, which may have contributed to Hinkie's labor ended up bearing fruit, as the highly-touted Embiid resignation in 2016. "The Process" finally paid off once Embiid and Simmons overcame their injury issues and made his NBA debut TWO YEARS after getting drafted their long-awaited debuts in 2016 and proceeded to show All-star level talent that appeared to vindicate Hinkie's plan.2017, respectively, as the two of them became All-Star talents and subsequently brought the 76ers back into playoff contention in 2018.


** After failed attempts to rebuild in the post-Iverson era left the Sixers as an Eastern Conference also-ran in the early NewTens, new Sixers GM Sam Hinkie proceeded to do the unthinkable and spent the 2013 offseason trading away practically every All-star level player in Philly's roster, with the intention of building the Sixers from the ground up with young talent acquired in the NBA draft. The Sixers predictably struggled in the wake of those moves.

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** After failed attempts to rebuild in the post-Iverson era left the Sixers as an Eastern Conference also-ran in the early NewTens, new Sixers GM Sam Hinkie proceeded to do the unthinkable and spent the 2013 offseason trading away practically every star player Jrue Holiday and letting go of other key veterans, intending to build the 76ers from scratch with youth. Hinkie's plan was to have the team constantly struggling, while earning high draft picks as the result of said ineptitude. Unfortunately, the plan didn't quite work out as well at first, with the players obtained with said picks either hampered with injury issues (e.g. Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons) or ending up as relative disappointments (e.g. Jahlil Okafor, Nerlens Noel). The Sixers' lack of success, along with fans' frustration at having to watch a perennially lottery-bound team, led to Hinkie resigning in 2016. By that time, the fruits of Hinkie's labor ended up bearing fruit, as the highly-touted Embiid finally made his NBA debut TWO YEARS after getting drafted and proceeded to show All-star level player in Philly's roster, with the intention of building the Sixers from the ground up with young talent acquired in the NBA draft. The Sixers predictably struggled in the wake of those moves.that appeared to vindicate Hinkie's plan.


* The Philadelphia 76ers have had three distinctive [[DorkAges Dark Periods]] in their history, following mostly the same pattern (Sixers lose stars, try to rebuild, then build around new star player)
** After Wilt Chamberlain was traded to the Lakers in 1967, the Sixers spiraled downhill as star players Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham followed suit, which led to the team missing the playoffs for the first time ever in 1972. Next season saw the team reach new lows, as a depleted Sixers squad containing a past-it Hal Greer and a bunch of nobodies posted a 9-73 record, which stood for the longest time as the worst ever season record in NBA history. Philly bounced back to playoff contention shortly afterwards, signing George McGinnis, drafting Darryl Dawkins, and hiring Gene Shue as coach. The Sixers then acquired Julius Erving from the Nets after the ABA-NBA merger, which brought the team back into the ranks of the NBA's elite.

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* The Philadelphia 76ers have had three distinctive [[DorkAges [[DorkAge Dark Periods]] in their history, following mostly the same pattern (Sixers lose stars, try to rebuild, then build around new star player)
** After Wilt Chamberlain was traded to the Lakers in 1967, the Sixers spiraled downhill as star players Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham followed suit, which led to the team missing the playoffs for the first time ever in 1972. Next season saw the team reach new lows, as a depleted Sixers squad containing a past-it Hal Greer and a bunch of nobodies posted a 9-73 record, which stood for the longest time as the worst ever season record in NBA history. Philly bounced back to playoff contention shortly afterwards, signing George McGinnis, [=McGinnis=], drafting Darryl Dawkins, and hiring Gene Shue as coach. The Sixers then acquired Julius Erving from the Nets after the 1976's ABA-NBA merger, which brought the team back into the ranks of the NBA's elite.elite.
** While Erving's retirement didn't hurt the Sixers too much due to the emergence of Charles Barkley, Barkley's own trade to the Phoenix Suns brought the team down to mediocrity throughout the mid-90's. Said period was characterized by constant playoff misses, free agency disappointments (e.g. Scott Skiles, Charles Shackleford, an aging Orlando Woolridge), draft busts (Shawn Bradley over Penny Hardaway, Sharone Wright over Eddie Jones), and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking ugly, star-laden uniforms]]. Philadelphia would only climb back to respectability soon after they drafted Allen Iverson first overall in 1996.
** After failed attempts to rebuild in the post-Iverson era left the Sixers as an Eastern Conference also-ran in the early NewTens, new Sixers GM Sam Hinkie proceeded to do the unthinkable and spent the 2013 offseason trading away practically every All-star level player in Philly's roster, with the intention of building the Sixers from the ground up with young talent acquired in the NBA draft. The Sixers predictably struggled in the wake of those moves.


* The storied Boston Celtics also had quite the dark age of their own once the star-studded Larry Bird-led teams of the 80's fell apart. The DorkAge began on a tragic note, as Bird's [[WhatCouldHaveBeen would-be successor]] Len Bias [[AuthorExistenceFailure died of a cocaine overdose]]. The Celtics would still remain competitive for a while, but Larry Bird's [[GameBreakingInjury numerous back and foot issues]] would start to plague the team as they fell from a Title Contender to an also-ran. Boston would drop like a stone once TheNineties started rolling: Larry Bird retired in 1992, promising young star Reggie Lewis [[AuthorExistenceFailure died in 1993 due to heart issues]], aging stars Kevin [=McHale=] and Robert Parish left the team, and a gutted Celtics team would miss the playoffs for the first time in 1994. The Celtics then spent the middle part of the decade retooling their roster with younger players, with some panning out (Dino Radja, Dee Brown, Davis Wesley, Rick Fox) and some flopping (Eric Montross, Eric Williams, Dana Barros), but could never quite get over the hump in a stacked Eastern Conference, culminating in the team losing a franchise-record 67 games in 1996. In spite of those setbacks, the Celtics seemed to be on the way to renewed glory in the late 90's, as Boston signed college coach Rick Pitino and played host to younger stars like Paul Pierce, Chauncey Billups, and Antoine Walker. While the Celts would keep missing the playoffs as the likes of Pitino and Billups ended up as relative disappointments, Paul Pierce would end up becoming the Celtics' newest franchise player, and his rise to stardom coincided with the team crawling back to respectability in the 2000's, which led to Boston [[EarnYourHappyEnding finally winning their 17th Championship in 2008]].

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* The storied Boston Celtics also had quite the dark age of their own once the star-studded Larry Bird-led teams of the 80's fell apart. The DorkAge began on a tragic note, as Bird's [[WhatCouldHaveBeen would-be successor]] Len Bias [[AuthorExistenceFailure died of a cocaine overdose]]. The Celtics would still remain competitive for a while, but Larry Bird's [[GameBreakingInjury numerous back and foot issues]] would start to plague the team as they fell from a Title Contender to an also-ran. Boston would drop like a stone once TheNineties started rolling: Larry Bird retired in 1992, promising young star Reggie Lewis [[AuthorExistenceFailure died in 1993 due to heart issues]], aging stars Kevin [=McHale=] and Robert Parish left the team, and a gutted Celtics team would miss the playoffs for the first time in 1994. The Celtics then spent the middle part of the decade retooling their roster with younger players, with some panning out (Dino Radja, Dee Brown, Davis Wesley, Rick Fox) and some flopping (Eric Montross, Eric Williams, Dana Barros), but could never quite get over the hump in a stacked Eastern Conference, culminating in the team losing a franchise-record 67 games in 1996. In spite of those setbacks, While the playoff misses continued as the 90's drew to a close, the Celtics seemed to be on the way to renewed glory in the late 90's, as Boston signed under renowned college coach Rick Pitino and played host to Pitino, sporting younger stars like Paul Pierce, Chauncey Billups, and Antoine Walker. While the Celts would keep missing the playoffs as the likes of Pitino and Billups ended up as relative disappointments, Paul Pierce would end up becoming the Celtics' newest franchise player, and his player. His rise to stardom coincided with the team crawling back to respectability in the 2000's, which led to culminating in Boston [[EarnYourHappyEnding finally winning their 17th Championship in 2008]].2008]] once Kevin Garnett, Rajon Rondo, and Ray Allen arrived.
* The Philadelphia 76ers have had three distinctive [[DorkAges Dark Periods]] in their history, following mostly the same pattern (Sixers lose stars, try to rebuild, then build around new star player)
** After Wilt Chamberlain was traded to the Lakers in 1967, the Sixers spiraled downhill as star players Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham followed suit, which led to the team missing the playoffs for the first time ever in 1972. Next season saw the team reach new lows, as a depleted Sixers squad containing a past-it Hal Greer and a bunch of nobodies posted a 9-73 record, which stood for the longest time as the worst ever season record in NBA history. Philly bounced back to playoff contention shortly afterwards, signing George McGinnis, drafting Darryl Dawkins, and hiring Gene Shue as coach. The Sixers then acquired Julius Erving from the Nets after the ABA-NBA merger, which brought the team back into the ranks of the NBA's elite.

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