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** “Record of a Defection”: Il-cheol is banned from joining the Party, hindering any hope of advancement in his career and ostracizing him socially, because his ''father'' accidentally killed a crate of rice seedlings during the country’s transition to collective farming. Il-cheol's nephew Min-hyuk is likewise bullied and held back in school.

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** “Record "Record of a Defection”: Defection": Il-cheol is banned from joining the Party, hindering any hope of advancement in his career and ostracizing him socially, because his ''father'' accidentally killed a crate of rice seedlings during the country’s country's transition to collective farming. Il-cheol's nephew Min-hyuk is likewise bullied and held back in school.



* The narrator of "Literature/TheCaskOfAmontillado", Montressor, is insulted by Fortunato prior to the beginning of the story. While it isn't said what the insult is, apparently it wasn't so severe that Fortunato thought their friendship was dissolved. In any case, it's difficult to imagine that he could have done anything that would make [[spoiler:walling him up in a wine cellar and leaving him to die of dehydration]] anything but disproportionate.

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* The narrator of "Literature/TheCaskOfAmontillado", ''Literature/TheCaskOfAmontillado'', Montressor, is insulted by Fortunato prior to the beginning of the story. While it isn't said what the insult is, apparently it wasn't so severe that Fortunato thought their friendship was dissolved. In any case, it's difficult to imagine that he could have done anything that would make [[spoiler:walling him up in a wine cellar and leaving him to die of dehydration]] anything but disproportionate.



* Creator/RobertEHoward's Literature/ConanTheBarbarian:
** In the story "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword", Thoth-Amon, having gotten back his RingOfPower and wanting more than anything to make his former master Ascalante pay for all the humiliation he's heaped upon him, sends a demon of Set after him and throws in, just for giggles, everyone with him at the time. Including, as it happens, Conan whom Ascalante was trying to assassinate at the time.
** In "Literature/BeyondTheBlackRiver", Conan vows to kill ten Picts for Balthus's death, and seven for the dog that died with him. To be sure, the Picts had slaughtered a lot more than seventeen in their attack.

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* Creator/RobertEHoward's Literature/ConanTheBarbarian:
''Literature/ConanTheBarbarian'':
** In the story "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword", ''Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword'', Thoth-Amon, having gotten back his RingOfPower and wanting more than anything to make his former master Ascalante pay for all the humiliation he's heaped upon him, sends a demon of Set after him and throws in, just for giggles, everyone with him at the time. Including, as it happens, Conan whom Ascalante was trying to assassinate at the time.
** In "Literature/BeyondTheBlackRiver", ''Literature/BeyondTheBlackRiver'', Conan vows to kill ten Picts for Balthus's death, and seven for the dog that died with him. To be sure, the Picts had slaughtered a lot more than seventeen in their attack.



* In Creator/PoulAnderson's "Literature/TimeLag", the invaders make an example of a number of villages when they are faced with opposition.

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* In Creator/PoulAnderson's "Literature/TimeLag", ''Literature/TimeLag'', the invaders make an example of a number of villages when they are faced with opposition.

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* In ''Literature/OneOfUsIsLying'', this is what people tend to receive as a result of Simon posting their secrets on his gossip app, About That. [[spoiler: His "murder" was really a suicide staged to ruin the lives of the four students he arranged to be in detention with him]].
** The Bayview Four were targeted by the real killer because of this. [[spoiler: Simon hated Bronwyn because she and Leah once told him the wrong deadline for the Model UN, which he decided was deliberate. Cooper got him uninvited to an after-Prom party. And Nate dared to hook up with Keely. For this, he decided they deserved to have their lives ruined]].
** [[spoiler: Jake decides Addy deserves to have her life ruined with a false murder charge because she cheated on him]].
** In the backstory, Simon ruined Leah's life with gossip about her sex life [[spoiler: because she and Bronwyn told him the wrong deadline for the Model UN, which he decided was deliberate]].
** In the sequel, [[spoiler: Jared Jackson wants to kill Eli ''and his whole wedding party'', with a bomb because Eli's biggest case involved getting his CorruptCop brother arrested, resulting in both his parents' deaths. Tragic? Yes. Grounds for mass murder? No]]!


* In the ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' book ''Chicken Chicken'', the villain Vanessa puts the main characters through horrific BodyHorror... because they (accidentally!) bumped into her and didn't apologize. Troy Steele, author of Blog/BloggerBeware, stated that they "literally threw the goddamn book across the room" at the twist ending where Cole (the boy of the PlatonicBoyGirlHeroes pair) ''had the gall'' to burp after drinking the soda that Vanessa ''gave'' to them and proceeded to say "[[HereWeGoAgain Pig pig]]".

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* In the ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' book ''Chicken Chicken'', the villain Vanessa puts the main characters through horrific BodyHorror... because they (accidentally!) bumped into her and didn't apologize. Troy Steele, author of Blog/BloggerBeware, stated that they "literally threw the goddamn book across the room" at the twist ending where Cole (the boy of the PlatonicBoyGirlHeroes pair) Brother-Sisterteam) ''had the gall'' to burp after drinking the soda that Vanessa ''gave'' to them and proceeded to say "[[HereWeGoAgain Pig pig]]".


* in ''Literature/OurMothersHouse'' Gertie is abused (sexually touched) by a local mechanic. "Mother" orders she be punished by having her hair cut, not talked to, having her most prized possession taken away, limiting how much she can eat/drink.......[[spoiler: and she later dies from it. All because she got abused and supposedly liked it.]]
** They're also known to punish unauthorized/unapproved sex by superglueing the participants' cloacas (the avian orifice for sex, excretion, and defecation) shut. This often leads to a slow, painful death as the body is no longer capable of removing waste.

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* in In ''Literature/OurMothersHouse'' Gertie is abused (sexually touched) by a local mechanic. "Mother" orders she be punished by having her hair cut, not talked to, having her most prized possession taken away, limiting how much she can eat/drink.......[[spoiler: and she later dies from it. All because she got abused and supposedly liked it.]]
** They're also known to punish unauthorized/unapproved sex by superglueing the participants' cloacas (the avian orifice for sex, excretion, and defecation) shut. This often leads to a slow, painful death as the body is no longer capable of removing waste.
]]

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** Chris plans to get revenge on Carrie by getting her elected prom queen and [[PromWrecker dumping pig's blood on her while she's on stage]]. What did Carrie do to deserve this? Nothing. Chris was being punished [[NeverMyFault for picking on Carrie]].



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* ''Literature/{{Zomboy}}'': [[spoiler:Calvin's older brother]] Luther gets beaten by [[UndeadChild Imre]] in a football game, and is inadvertantly called "toast" by Bob. His response? He and his dad and his friend go to Imre's house to burn it down.

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* ''Literature/{{Flawed}}'': Someone can be branded as "flawed" for doing something as minor as helping a Flawed individual, even if that individual is at risk of dying. A single misstep can leave someone treated as a social pariah for life, even if others do worse.



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* ''Literature/{{Woodwalkers}}'': The plan of BigBad [[spoiler: Andrew Milling. The only reason why he wants to destroy humanity is because ''one'' hunter[[note]]who didn't even know woodwalkers exist[[/note]] killed his wife and daughter in their animal-form]]
** [[spoiler: Milling also kidnaps Melody and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking sends Carag some hate-mails]] just because Carag refused to work for him.]]

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** ''Literature/TalesOfTheBountyHunters'': Boba Fett firmly believes in harsh punishment for things most people wouldn't consider deserving it, or even immoral at all. This includes death for corruption or extramarital sex.

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* Apparently... in ''Literature/ObjectOblivion'', [[spoiler: derailing the Cha Cha Slide]] gets you [[PersonaNonGrata banned from South Carolina]]. [[spoiler: TNT learned it the hard way.]]


* Not as violent or as graphic as some examples, but Anne does this in the ''Literature/AnneOfGreenGables'' series in one of the most infamous scenes in all of literature. Most of the girls of Avonlea school are quite used to being teased by Gilbert Blythe, and most ignore it or become mildly offended. When Gilbert [[BerserkButton dares to make fun of Anne's red hair]], Anne smashes her slate over his head and breaks it in half. ''And'' refuses to speak to him for years afterward. Quite the hefty punishment for one ill-timed comment.

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* Not as violent or as graphic as some examples, but Anne does this in the ''Literature/AnneOfGreenGables'' series in one of the most infamous scenes in all of literature. Most of the girls of Avonlea school are quite used to being teased by Gilbert Blythe, and most ignore it or become mildly offended. When Gilbert [[BerserkButton dares to make fun of Anne's red hair]], Anne smashes her slate over his head and breaks it in half. ''And'' refuses to speak to him for years afterward. Quite the hefty punishment for one ill-timed comment. Most adaptations downplay this by having her ignore him until he yanks on her hair, prompting the above slate smashing.


* ''Literature/{{Circleverse}}'': In ''Literature/BattleMagic'', [[TheEmperor Emperor Waishu]] of Yanjing is shown to be prone to this. He has a rose garden, and the gardeners working on it burned just because a small patch of mold was found on one plant when he was showing it off to Briar and Rosethorn. The rose bush that had the mold escaped being burned because Rosethorn begged the emperor to give it to her as a present after she had healed it.

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* ''Literature/{{Circleverse}}'': In ''Literature/BattleMagic'', [[TheEmperor Emperor Waishu]] Weishu]] of Yanjing is shown to be prone to this. He has a rose garden, and the gardeners working on it burned just because a small patch of mold was found on one plant when he was showing it off to Briar and Rosethorn. The rose bush that had the mold escaped being burned because Rosethorn begged the emperor to give it to her as a present after she had healed it.


* The decidedly anti-heroic protagonist of Creator/StephenFry's ''Literature/TheStarsTennisBalls'' has gone very off of the deep end by the climax of the book. Holding the Shadowy Secret Agent who exiled him to an island prison captive, he gives him a choice. To be shot dead, or to have the slenderest hope of survival by swallowing burning coals, in the manner of Portia in ''Literature/JuliusCaesar''. The poor agent manages - somehow - to choke down a coal or two, and we have the horrific description of huge blisters erupting around his mouth as his vocal chords and windpipe are burnt out. This proves too much even for the protagonist, who promptly "mercy-kills" the guy with a shot to the head.

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* The decidedly anti-heroic protagonist of Creator/StephenFry's ''Literature/TheStarsTennisBalls'' has gone very off of the deep end by the climax of the book. Holding the Shadowy Secret Agent who exiled him to an island prison captive, he gives him a choice. To be shot dead, or to have the slenderest hope of survival by swallowing burning coals, in the manner of Portia in ''Literature/JuliusCaesar''.''Theatre/JuliusCaesar''. The poor agent manages - somehow - to choke down a coal or two, and we have the horrific description of huge blisters erupting around his mouth as his vocal chords and windpipe are burnt out. This proves too much even for the protagonist, who promptly "mercy-kills" the guy with a shot to the head.



* ''Literature/FortyEightLawsOfPower:'' In one tale in this book, Lope de Aguierre was sentenced to 200 lashes by Judge Esquivel for a serious crime. Aguierre wanted to be executed instead, but the Judge didn't allow it. Afterward Aguierre chased the judge through three cities, 1100 leagues over the course of three years and four months, some of which was on his bare feet (he had no shoes). Finally the Judge reached a city where the police were a strong force... only to be stabbed to death in his sleep.
* ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'': The amount of ColdBloodedTorture and MindRape that the Party put Winston through for his perceived crimes - keeping a journal, having a sexual relationship - is astonishing considering they're so trivial that they would have posed no threat to the Party's power base. It's very likely he would've continued writing propaganda for the Ministry of Truth, having secret meetings with Julia and pondering as to the existence of the Brotherhood until his life naturally expired... But for the Party, mere obedience is not enough; Winston has to ''love'' Big Brother, willingly or not.
* The ''Literature/{{Destroyermen}}'' series by Taylor Anderson has Gunner's Mate Dennis Silva USN, of the USS ''Walker''. Silva is pretty much the Patron Saint of this trope. Prank him into chewing "tobacco" that's actually a powerful laxative, like his lemurian buddy Chack did? He will scandalize your sister (with her willing assistance). Break his favorite gun? He will beat you to death with it, as some Holy Dominion ''soldados'' found out the hard way. Kidnap Princess Rebecca Anne [=McDonald=], who he considers his adopted little sister? ''You and everyone you know are going to die''.
* The entire plot of the appropriately named ''[[Literature/TheAdversaryCycle Reprisal]]'' is [[spoiler: Rasalom's revenge on Bill for almost causing Carol to have a miscarriage when she was pregnant with him by refusing to have an affair with her. The goodness of him refusing to break his vows as a priest did this, so it wasn't like Bill almost killed him on purpose. Rasalom responds by ruining Bill's life, mostly by committing horrible atrocities on the people close to him. Rasalom seems to do this a lot.]]
* Done a great deal in Literature/AesopsFables. One particularly harsh example is in the story of the monkey and the camel. The monkey danced for all the desert animals and amused them with how nimble and cute he was. The camel saw this and figured that he could do just as well. He showed off, trying to dance as well, but was much clumsier and oafish. The animals were so annoyed at his terrible dancing that they drove him out of the desert, and then ate him, "serving refreshments of camel humps and ribs".

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* ''Literature/FortyEightLawsOfPower:'' ''[[Literature/FortyEightLawsOfPower 48 Laws of Power]]'': In one tale in this book, Lope de Aguierre was sentenced to 200 lashes by Judge Esquivel for a serious crime. Aguierre wanted to be executed instead, but the Judge didn't allow it. Afterward Aguierre chased the judge through three cities, 1100 leagues over the course of three years and four months, some of which was on his bare feet (he had no shoes). Finally the Judge reached a city where the police were a strong force... only to be stabbed to death in his sleep.
* ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'': The amount North Korean government has a policy of ColdBloodedTorture and MindRape that the Party put Winston through for his perceived crimes - keeping this according to ''Literature/TheAccusation''. Any accident or moment of bad judgement, no matter how small or justified, can be spun as treasonous.
** “Record of
a journal, having a sexual relationship - Defection”: Il-cheol is astonishing considering they're so trivial that they would have posed no threat to the Party's power base. It's very likely he would've continued writing propaganda for the Ministry of Truth, having secret meetings with Julia and pondering as to the existence of the Brotherhood until his life naturally expired... But for banned from joining the Party, mere obedience hindering any hope of advancement in his career and ostracizing him socially, because his ''father'' accidentally killed a crate of rice seedlings during the country’s transition to collective farming. Il-cheol's nephew Min-hyuk is not enough; Winston has to ''love'' Big Brother, willingly or not.
*
likewise bullied and held back in school.
** "City of Specters":
The ''Literature/{{Destroyermen}}'' series by Taylor Anderson has Gunner's Mate Dennis Silva USN, local party secretary accuses Gyeong-hee of the USS ''Walker''. Silva is pretty much the Patron Saint of this trope. Prank him into chewing "tobacco" that's actually a powerful laxative, like his lemurian buddy Chack did? He will scandalize your sister (with potential espionage based on her willing assistance). Break his favorite gun? He will beat you window curtain choices. [[spoiler: The family is ultimately [[DeadlyEuphemism "banished"]] because their infant son is frightened by posters of Karl Marx.]]
** "So Near, Yet So Far": [[spoiler: Myeong-chol goes
to death a prison camp for three weeks as punishment for traveling without a permit.]]
** "On Stage": Kyeong-hun lands in hot water for holding hands
with it, as some Holy Dominion ''soldados'' found out a girl and (allegedly) drinking during the hard way. Kidnap Princess Rebecca Anne [=McDonald=], who he considers his adopted little sister? ''You and everyone you know are going official mourning period for Kim Il-Sung's death. His friend Kim Suk-i's entire family is sent to die''.a labor camp because her father stated that Kim Jong-il has a second wife.
** "The Red Mushroom": Ko Inshik is demoted and sent to work in a backwater farming town when it's discovered that his presumed dead brother is in fact alive and living in South Korea.
* ''Literature/TheAdversaryCycle'': The entire plot of the appropriately named ''[[Literature/TheAdversaryCycle Reprisal]]'' ''Reprisal'' is [[spoiler: Rasalom's revenge on Bill for almost causing Carol to have a miscarriage when she was pregnant with him by refusing to have an affair with her. The goodness of him refusing to break his vows as a priest did this, so it wasn't like Bill almost killed him on purpose. Rasalom responds by ruining Bill's life, mostly by committing horrible atrocities on the people close to him. Rasalom seems to do this a lot.]]
* Done a great deal in Literature/AesopsFables.''Literature/AesopsFables''. One particularly harsh example is in the story of the monkey and the camel. The monkey danced for all the desert animals and amused them with how nimble and cute he was. The camel saw this and figured that he could do just as well. He showed off, trying to dance as well, but was much clumsier and oafish. The animals were so annoyed at his terrible dancing that they drove him out of the desert, and then ate him, "serving refreshments of camel humps and ribs".



* Literature/TakeshiKovacs tends to do this kind of thing [[AxCrazy at]] [[AntiHero least]] [[SociopathicSoldier once]] per book.
** In ''Altered Carbon'', he is placed into a torture program for 24 simulated hours by some PunchClockVillain technicians hired by the BigBad. After he escapes, he remembers a passage from his favorite author about making every struggle personal. He returns to the technicians' office and kills everyone who works there, then goes to a strip club that is tangentially related to the affair and massacres everyone working there as well. He melts the heads of everyone he kills, preventing them from being resurrected in a new body, as most people are after death. His rampage is considered outrageous by everyone who learns about it.
** In ''Broken Angels'' he massacres an entire troop of [[spoiler: Carrera's Wedge soldiers to avenge a friend despite only a few of them even being involved.]] And another character, revolutionary leader Kemp, nuked a city due to [[spoiler: Hand's manipulations.]]
** Sometime before ''Woken Furies'' Kovacs learned that his ex-girlfriend married a religious fanatic, had a daughter who was killed in an accident, then tried to resurrect her against her husband's religion. But the priests caught her, tortured her to death, and tossed her [[BodyBackupDrive cortical stack]] in the ocean, effectively killing her for good. Kovacs found her husband, dragged the names of the ones who dumped her stack out of him, tortured and killed them, then went on to slaughter everyone in their village who was an adult at the time and had their stacks put in animals used for pit fights. By the time the book starts he's making a bit of a dent in the faith's hierarchy.
* In ''[[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet A Nightmare on Elm Street: Perchance To Dream]]'', main character Jacob Johnson uses his powers to stop everyone in Springwood from dreaming in order to protect them from Freddy. This has the adverse side-effect of making everyone edgy, paranoid, and violent; at one point a character browses through a newspaper and finds a section mentioning a kid who stabbed his teacher in the eye with a pencil after getting a bad mark and a man who shot his wife because she was "vacuuming in a really irritating way".



* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has a number of examples.
** One of the first things we learn about Gregor Clegane is that he held his little brother's face to a burning brazier for playing with one of his old toys, scarring him for life.
** Petyr Baelish's kingdom-conquering is mostly due to a grudge he nurses from being rejected by his childhood sweetheart for a wealthier and more dashing man.
** The Lannisters are well known for their harsh retribution. A popular song, "The Rains of Castamere" was written about how they completely wiped out two noble houses for being disloyal.
*** In the first book, Tywin Lannister had an innkeeper hanged. Her crime? Owning the inn where his [[TheUnfavorite least favourite]] son Tyrion was kidnapped.
** The Freys have possibly the most shocking example: [[spoiler:After Robb Stark reneges on his wedding promise to House Frey, Lord Walder massacres Robb, his mother, most of his noble bannermen, and most of his army at the wedding feast of his uncle, thereafter called The Red Wedding.]]
*** Afterwards, just having the last name Frey is a crime punishable by DisproportionateRetribution among some groups. The Brotherhood Without Banners, led by Lady Stoneheart ([[spoiler:AKA undead Catelyn Stark]]), hangs any Frey they catch. Up in the North, Lord Wyman Manderly [[spoiler:(who lost a son at the Red Wedding), has three Freys who visited his court killed, baked into pies, and fed to their relatives at Winterfell. To [[LoopholeAbuse avoid breaking]] [[SacredHospitality guest right]] like the Freys did, he gives them horses as gifts to signify they're no longer under his protection]].
** Joffrey Baratheon/Lannister/Waters is also know for this trope, typically cutting everybody's heads off for any act of defiance or making them duel to the death. However, one of his biggest moments of douchery comes when he has Sansa Stark stripped naked and beaten bloody, ''in front of the entire court'', because her brother won a battle.

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has a number of examples.According to Creator/{{Aristotle}}, Greek {{Tragedy}} actually requires that the TragicHero suffer disproportionate retribution for his actions. Aristotle judged that it had to be this way because if the hero was innocent than he wouldn't get CharacterDevelopment and if he deserved his fate than it wouldn't be tragic.
** One * In ''The Burden of Evil'' by Creator/StrugatskyBrothers, a colony of hippies (called "flora" in text) is attacked by people of the first things town Tashlinsk, and its inhabitants beaten and arrested, simply because a few of them stole food in the town. A kind schoolteacher trying to stop the mayhem is killed.
** InUniverse
we learn about Gregor Clegane once get a painting named "Das Motorrad unter dem Fenster am Sonntagmorgen" ("A motobike under the window on Sunday morning"). The painting shows a bedroom, in which a man in a nightgown runs towards the window, grenade in hand. The implication is that he held his little brother's face to a burning brazier for playing with one of his old toys, scarring him for life.
** Petyr Baelish's kingdom-conquering is mostly due to a grudge he nurses from being rejected by his childhood sweetheart for a wealthier
the motorbike woke the man up, and more dashing man.
** The Lannisters are well known for their harsh retribution. A popular song, "The Rains of Castamere" was written about how they completely wiped out two noble houses for being disloyal.
*** In the first book, Tywin Lannister had an innkeeper hanged. Her crime? Owning the inn where his [[TheUnfavorite least favourite]] son Tyrion was kidnapped.
** The Freys have possibly the most shocking example: [[spoiler:After Robb Stark reneges on his wedding promise to House Frey, Lord Walder massacres Robb, his mother, most of his noble bannermen, and most of his army at the wedding feast of his uncle, thereafter called The Red Wedding.]]
*** Afterwards, just having the last name Frey is a crime punishable by DisproportionateRetribution among some groups. The Brotherhood Without Banners, led by Lady Stoneheart ([[spoiler:AKA undead Catelyn Stark]]), hangs any Frey they catch. Up in the North, Lord Wyman Manderly [[spoiler:(who lost a son at the Red Wedding), has three Freys who visited his court killed, baked into pies, and fed to their relatives at Winterfell. To [[LoopholeAbuse avoid breaking]] [[SacredHospitality guest right]] like the Freys did, he gives them horses as gifts to signify they're no longer under his protection]].
** Joffrey Baratheon/Lannister/Waters is also know
for this trope, typically cutting everybody's heads off for any act of defiance or making them duel to the death. However, one of his biggest moments of douchery comes when he has Sansa Stark stripped naked and beaten bloody, ''in front of man is going to blow up the entire court'', because her brother won a battle.bike along with the motorist. [[spoiler:The artist turns out to be UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler.]]



* In Creator/MikhailAkhmanov and Christopher Nicholas Gilmore's novel ''CaptainFrenchOrTheQuestForParadise'', the titular character retells the story of Captain Regos to his new wife. Regos, a space trader like French, once traveled with his beautiful wife to a planet ruled by a tyrannical dictator who fancied himself GodEmperor. While most planets treat space traders like royalty (or, at least, honored guests), the dictator took a liking to Regos's wife, had his people tie Regos up and send him back to his ship. However, Regos's wife refused to pleasure the dictator and was executed the next morning for displeasing the GodEmperor (a capital crime). All Regos got were her ashes. Regos spent the next several months in the system's asteroid belt building a giant [[KillSat laser cannon]], which he then used to threaten the planetary population to turn over the GodEmperor to him lest they all pay the price (he vaporized a mountain just to prove he could). Finally, someone did get smart and handed over the dictator. Regos proceeded to torture him for many days, recording the "sessions" on video before finally killing him. The video has since been distributed to all worlds with a clear non-verbal message - don't fuck with space traders. When French's wife asks him what he would do if something similar happened to her, he replies he'd build an even bigger laser.
* In ''[[Literature/CarrerasLegions The Lotus Eaters]]'', Legate Pigna gets wadded up paper thrown in his face and yelled at by Carrera, who was angry about how bureaucratized the Legion was getting in the year after [[spoiler: his HeroicBSOD]]. The response? [[spoiler: Plot with the enemy to overthrow the government.]]

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* In Creator/MikhailAkhmanov and Christopher Nicholas Gilmore's novel ''CaptainFrenchOrTheQuestForParadise'', ''Literature/CaptainFrenchOrTheQuestForParadise'', the titular character retells the story of Captain Regos to his new wife. Regos, a space trader like French, once traveled with his beautiful wife to a planet ruled by a tyrannical dictator who fancied himself GodEmperor. While most planets treat space traders like royalty (or, at least, honored guests), the dictator took a liking to Regos's wife, had his people tie Regos up and send him back to his ship. However, Regos's wife refused to pleasure the dictator and was executed the next morning for displeasing the GodEmperor (a capital crime). All Regos got were her ashes. Regos spent the next several months in the system's asteroid belt building a giant [[KillSat laser cannon]], which he then used to threaten the planetary population to turn over the GodEmperor to him lest they all pay the price (he vaporized a mountain just to prove he could). Finally, someone did get smart and handed over the dictator. Regos proceeded to torture him for many days, recording the "sessions" on video before finally killing him. The video has since been distributed to all worlds with a clear non-verbal message - don't fuck with space traders. When French's wife asks him what he would do if something similar happened to her, he replies he'd build an even bigger laser.
* ''Literature/CarrerasLegions'': In ''[[Literature/CarrerasLegions The ''The Lotus Eaters]]'', Eaters'', Legate Pigna gets wadded up wadded-up paper thrown in his face and yelled at by Carrera, who was angry about how bureaucratized the Legion was getting in the year after [[spoiler: his HeroicBSOD]]. The response? [[spoiler: Plot with the enemy to overthrow the government.]]



* In ''{{Literature/Carrie}},'' the protagonist's mother, [[TheFundamentalist Margaret White,]] once caught her asking a sunbathing neighbor about her breasts when she was three. Her reaction was to try to kill her with a butcher knife.

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* In ''{{Literature/Carrie}},'' ''{{Literature/Carrie}}'', the protagonist's mother, [[TheFundamentalist Margaret White,]] White]], once caught her asking a sunbathing neighbor about her breasts when she was three. Her reaction was to try to kill her with a butcher knife.



* In ''The Highland Twins at the Literature/ChaletSchool'', when Fiona [=McDonald=] makes a snarky comment at Betty Wynne-Davies, Betty responds by planning to steal the Chart of Erisay, a document containing military information about the remote Scottish island where the [=McDonalds=] live. She then makes a deal with a Nazi spy to hand it over to him, after he hears her talking about it and corners her. When news gets back to the school and police are called in, Betty winds up being expelled.
** More generally, one way to guarantee getting punished in the Chalet School, usually by fines and a heavy ticking off, is...''talking slang''. Yeah.
* In ''ChildrenOfTheRiver'', Sundara's LoveInterest back in Cambodia, Chamroeun, is revealed to have been [[spoiler:[[OffWithHisHead beheaded with a hoe]] for (horror of horrors) stealing a potato because he was hungry]].

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* ''Literature/ChaletSchool'': In ''The Highland Twins at the Literature/ChaletSchool'', Chalet School'', when Fiona [=McDonald=] makes a snarky comment at Betty Wynne-Davies, Betty responds by planning to steal the Chart of Erisay, a document containing military information about the remote Scottish island where the [=McDonalds=] live. She then makes a deal with a Nazi spy to hand it over to him, after he hears her talking about it and corners her. When news gets back to the school and police are called in, Betty winds up being expelled.
** More generally, one way to guarantee getting punished in the Chalet School, usually by fines and a heavy ticking off, is... ''talking slang''. Yeah.
* In ''ChildrenOfTheRiver'', ''Literature/ChildrenOfTheRiver'', Sundara's LoveInterest back in Cambodia, Chamroeun, is revealed to have been [[spoiler:[[OffWithHisHead beheaded with a hoe]] for (horror of horrors) stealing a potato because he was hungry]].hungry]].
* ''Literature/{{Circleverse}}'': In ''Literature/BattleMagic'', [[TheEmperor Emperor Waishu]] of Yanjing is shown to be prone to this. He has a rose garden, and the gardeners working on it burned just because a small patch of mold was found on one plant when he was showing it off to Briar and Rosethorn. The rose bush that had the mold escaped being burned because Rosethorn begged the emperor to give it to her as a present after she had healed it.



* Creator/RobertEHoward's Literature/ConanTheBarbarian:
** In the story "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword", Thoth-Amon, having gotten back his RingOfPower and wanting more than anything to make his former master Ascalante pay for all the humiliation he's heaped upon him, sends a demon of Set after him and throws in, just for giggles, everyone with him at the time. Including, as it happens, Conan whom Ascalante was trying to assassinate at the time.
** In "Literature/BeyondTheBlackRiver", Conan vows to kill ten Picts for Balthus's death, and seven for the dog that died with him. To be sure, the Picts had slaughtered a lot more than seventeen in their attack.
** In "Wolves Beyond the Border", the Pict shaman Zogar Sag is briefly jailed for mugging a merchant and stealing his liquors. He reacts by summoning a Swamp Devil [[spoiler: (actually his brother)]] and sending him to kill the merchant and the guards who arrested him. However, Conan stated that imprisoning a Pict is the worst offense you can make to him.



* In ''[[Literature/{{Daemon}} Freedom]]'', [[SociopathicHero Loki/Gragg]] takes disproportionate retribution when a man cuts in line at a coffee shop and refuses to go to the end. He freezes all of his assets, plunges him into massive debt, ruins his credit, and has a warrant placed on him for unpaid parking tickets.

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* ''Literature/{{Daemon}}'': In ''[[Literature/{{Daemon}} Freedom]]'', ''Freedom'', [[SociopathicHero Loki/Gragg]] takes disproportionate retribution when a man cuts in line at a coffee shop and refuses to go to the end. He freezes all of his assets, plunges him into massive debt, ruins his credit, and has a warrant placed on him for unpaid parking tickets.tickets.
* This is a recurring theme in Creator/RoaldDahl's books. Villains often suffer horrible punishments (often death) for their crimes, even if the crimes don't warrant it. (A lot of them are the type that WouldHurtAChild, but even so, what happens to a few of them is rather grim.)
** What happens to most of the kids in ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' qualifies. Their punishments were brought on by their flaws, but still rather excessive. Even though they all live and recover to some extent they have some unpleasant permanent changes. Violet, for example, is no longer inflated, but is still blue. Just for chewing gum.
** This is due to him as a child being sent to a sadistic boarding school where the teachers beat him constantly. So almost always his books involve kids triumphing over evil adults.



* The ''Literature/{{Destroyermen}}'' series by Taylor Anderson has Gunner's Mate Dennis Silva USN, of the USS ''Walker''. Silva is pretty much the Patron Saint of this trope. Prank him into chewing "tobacco" that's actually a powerful laxative, like his lemurian buddy Chack did? He will scandalize your sister (with her willing assistance). Break his favorite gun? He will beat you to death with it, as some Holy Dominion ''soldados'' found out the hard way. Kidnap Princess Rebecca Anne [=McDonald=], who he considers his adopted little sister? ''You and everyone you know are going to die''.



* In Creator/AletheaKontis's ''Literature/{{Enchanted}}'', Sunday's brother Jack was turned into a dog for killing the prince's dog. [[spoiler:Later, the prince remembers what had happened. Jack had pushed the dog away with his foot, which should not have killed, and would not have killed any other dog in the court. So the prince's FairyGodmother turned him into a dog. Whereupon Jack's fairy godmother appeared, limited it to a year, and then decreed that the prince -- who had done nothing -- would be turned into a frog for a year to teach him humility, or something.]]

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* In Creator/AletheaKontis's ''Literature/{{Enchanted}}'', Sunday's brother Jack was turned into a dog for killing the prince's dog. [[spoiler:Later, the prince remembers what had happened. Jack had pushed the dog away with his foot, which should not have killed, and would not have killed any other dog in the court. So the prince's FairyGodmother turned him into a dog. Whereupon Jack's fairy godmother appeared, limited it to a year, and then decreed that the prince -- who had done nothing -- would be turned into a frog for a year to teach him humility, or something.]]]]
** Mind you, the fact that Rumbold's fairy godmother [[spoiler:is one half of the novel's BigBadDuumvirate, and Jack's godmother is her twin sister who's trying to stop her]] likely has something to do with this as well.



* A minor character in ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' is trying to get to an EscapePod before the ship he's on self destructs. Two kids, Tash and Zak Arranda, who'd been on a pod leave it to help someone, then try to get back on, but the man thinks they're cutting in front of him. What does he do? Lock them in a storage closet, ''leaving them to die''. The ship does not actually explode, it was a false alarm, but that's ''harsh''.
* ''[[Literature/GentlemanBastard The Lies of Locke Lamora]]'' and its sequel feature a powerful magic guild called the Bondsmagi. One of them, Falconer, seem to be particularly guilty of this trope, as he tortures the main hero and threatens him with death of his friends just for speaking to him with no respect.

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* A minor character in ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' is trying to get to an EscapePod before the ship he's on self destructs. Two kids, Tash and Zak Arranda, who'd been on a pod leave it to help someone, then try to get back on, but the man thinks they're cutting in front of him. What does he do? Lock them in a storage closet, ''leaving them to die''. The ship does not actually explode, it was a false alarm, but that's ''harsh''.
* ''[[Literature/GentlemanBastard The Lies of Locke Lamora]]'' and its sequel feature
''Literature/GentlemanBastard'' series features a powerful magic guild called the Bondsmagi. One of them, Falconer, seem to be particularly guilty of this trope, as he tortures the main hero and threatens him with death of his friends just for speaking to him with no respect.



* A race introduced by Creator/TimothyZahn in the ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'' duology have this as part of their legal code. The penalty for murder is death, life for life - either one who is guilty, or ten of his clan who are innocent. They use this to justify flattening a Bothan space station and further inflaming the political mess engulfing the New Republic.
** The bothans themselves. A species had a single member slight the bothan race, and in retaliation, they burned the homeworld, slaughtered every member of the species, erased records of them, and '''Made them never have existed.'''



** Niven's short story from his ''Literature/KnownSpace'' series, "the Jigsaw Man", involves harvesting transplant organs from people condemned for capital crimes. Given the ever-increasing demand for such organs, the definition of "capital crime" gets broader and broader, with our protagonist facing execution for [[spoiler: ''traffic violations''.]]



* ''Literature/SpocksWorld'': Ruin [[spoiler: T'Pring's]] happiness with [[spoiler: Stonn]] by driving said character's beloved to suicide? They'll force the entire planet to vote to secede from the Federation, which would either send Spock and his family into exile or else trap Spock on Vulcan forever, ending his heroic and legendary trek to the stars. It doesn't help that, much like the MisplacedRetribution trope spells out, [[spoiler: T'Pring]] is more responsible for what happened to [[spoiler: Stonn]] than Spock is.



* In the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series, [[StepfordSmiler Ashfur]] gets dumped by [[RebelliousPrincess Squirrelflight]] in favor of [[NumberTwo Brambleclaw]]. What does he do? [[spoiler: He ''tries to murder her father'', the Clan's ''leader'', and get Brambleclaw blamed for it; when that fails, he waits [[BestServedCold moons]] until he has the chance to try again, this time targeting her ''kits''.]] All because she picked his best friend instead of him.
** Long before that, [[BloodKnight Thistleclaw]] ordered his apprentice (who would grow up to be Tigerstar) to attack and almost kill a kit who had accidentally wandered into their territory. This DisproportionateRetribution was eventually met with more DisproportionateRetribution, as the kit was a very young [[AxCrazy Scourge]], who eventually disemboweled Tigerstar, after Tigerstar tried to give Scourge's followers orders.
** Don't forget [[AxCrazy Scourge]] having [[ShrinkingViolet Violet]] nearly beaten to death because she dared to look for her missing brother.
* In Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/JustSoStories,'' the Cat who Walks By Himself gets some pretty harsh treatment simply for saying his CatchPhrase "I am the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to me." Some of the harsh treatment may be justified, because over a large part of the story, the Cat is clearly trying to get something without giving anything back in return -- nevertheless, when the Dog and the Man lay down the law and tell what they expect of the Cat in the future (keep the mice away, be kind to babies) and the Cat ''agrees'' to their terms, they ''still'' vow that they and their descendants will torment the Cat for always and always just because he spoke out of turn.

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* In the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series, [[StepfordSmiler Ashfur]] gets dumped by [[RebelliousPrincess Squirrelflight]] in favor of [[NumberTwo Brambleclaw]]. What does he do? [[spoiler: He ''tries to murder her father'', the Clan's ''leader'', and get Brambleclaw blamed for it; when that fails, he waits [[BestServedCold moons]] until he has the chance to try again, this time targeting her ''kits''.]] All because she picked his best friend instead of him.
** Long before that, [[BloodKnight Thistleclaw]] ordered his apprentice (who would grow up to be Tigerstar) to attack and almost kill a kit who had accidentally wandered into their territory. This DisproportionateRetribution was eventually met with more DisproportionateRetribution, as the kit was a very young [[AxCrazy Scourge]], who eventually disemboweled Tigerstar, after Tigerstar tried to give Scourge's followers orders.
** Don't forget [[AxCrazy Scourge]] having [[ShrinkingViolet Violet]] nearly beaten to death because she dared to look for her missing brother.
* In Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/JustSoStories,'' ''Literature/JustSoStories'', the Cat who Walks By Himself gets some pretty harsh treatment simply for saying his CatchPhrase "I am the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to me." Some of the harsh treatment may be justified, because over a large part of the story, the Cat is clearly trying to get something without giving anything back in return -- nevertheless, when the Dog and the Man lay down the law and tell what they expect of the Cat in the future (keep the mice away, be kind to babies) and the Cat ''agrees'' to their terms, they ''still'' vow that they and their descendants will torment the Cat for always and always just because he spoke out of turn.



* In ''Literature/LesMiserables'', Jean Valjean originally set out to steal a loaf of bread to feed his hungry family. However this was armed breaking-and-entering, and due to draconian laws and a series of escape attempts, he wound up serving 19 years in the galleys; and then, unable to find work or shelter after his release, he reoffended (stealing a 40-sous coin) and was given a life sentence.

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* In ''Literature/LesMiserables'', Jean Valjean originally set out to steal a loaf of bread to feed Niven's short story from his hungry family. However this was armed breaking-and-entering, ''Literature/KnownSpace'' series, "The Jigsaw Man", involves harvesting transplant organs from people condemned for capital crimes. Given the ever-increasing demand for such organs, the definition of "capital crime" gets broader and due to draconian laws and a series of escape attempts, he wound up serving 19 years in the galleys; and then, unable to find work or shelter after his release, he reoffended (stealing a 40-sous coin) and was given a life sentence.broader, with our protagonist facing execution for [[spoiler: ''traffic violations''.]]



* In the [[MagicTheGathering MTG]] set novels of Kamigawa, this is a big part of the Hyozan oath. The actual wording of the magical contract promises tenfold vengeance, but this is just a bare minimum. When [[spoiler:Kobo]] is murdered, Hidetsugo's vengeace includes condemning the actual triggerman to an [[AFateWorseThanDeath eternity of unbearble agony]] destroying Minomo academy, exterminating the moonfolk, and then [[KillTheGod eating their god]]. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking he also said some very mean things]]

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* In the [[MagicTheGathering MTG]] set ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering''-set novels of Kamigawa, this is a big part of the Hyozan oath. The actual wording of the magical contract promises tenfold vengeance, but this is just a bare minimum. When [[spoiler:Kobo]] is murdered, Hidetsugo's vengeace includes condemning the actual triggerman to an [[AFateWorseThanDeath eternity of unbearble agony]] destroying Minomo academy, exterminating the moonfolk, and then [[KillTheGod eating their god]]. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking he He also said some very mean things]]things.]]



* In ''Literature/LesMiserables'', Jean Valjean originally set out to steal a loaf of bread to feed his hungry family. However this was armed breaking-and-entering, and due to draconian laws and a series of escape attempts, he wound up serving 19 years in the galleys; and then, unable to find work or shelter after his release, he reoffended (stealing a 40-sous coin) and was given a life sentence.
* This is part of the main plot to ''Literature/{{Misery}}''. Annie rescues Paul, who she's a big fan of, but then becomes furious when she buys his latest book and finds out that he killed off her favorite character. Annie then threatens to kill Paul unless he writes a sequel to the book where the character is brought back to life. Many of the tortures Paul goes through fit this trope as well. Annie refuses to give Paul his painkillers for days and when she finally gives them to him, she forces him to wash them down with soapy water, all because she didn't like that he had swearing in the new book he was working on. Also, when Paul complains that one of the keys on his typewriter doesn't work, Annie cuts off his thumb with an electric knife.



* In ''[[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet A Nightmare on Elm Street: Perchance To Dream]]'', main character Jacob Johnson uses his powers to stop everyone in Springwood from dreaming in order to protect them from Freddy. This has the adverse side-effect of making everyone edgy, paranoid, and violent; at one point a character browses through a newspaper and finds a section mentioning a kid who stabbed his teacher in the eye with a pencil after getting a bad mark and a man who shot his wife because she was "vacuuming in a really irritating way".
* ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'': The amount of ColdBloodedTorture and MindRape that the Party put Winston through for his perceived crimes - keeping a journal, having a sexual relationship - is astonishing considering they're so trivial that they would have posed no threat to the Party's power base. It's very likely he would've continued writing propaganda for the Ministry of Truth, having secret meetings with Julia and pondering as to the existence of the Brotherhood until his life naturally expired... But for the Party, mere obedience is not enough; Winston has to ''love'' Big Brother, willingly or not.



* Creator/RobertEHoward's Literature/ConanTheBarbarian:
** In the story "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword", Thoth-Amon, having gotten back his RingOfPower and wanting more than anything to make his former master Ascalante pay for all the humiliation he's heaped upon him, sends a demon of Set after him and throws in, just for giggles, everyone with him at the time. Including, as it happens, Conan whom Ascalante was trying to assassinate at the time.
** In "Literature/BeyondTheBlackRiver", Conan vows to kill ten Picts for Balthus's death, and seven for the dog that died with him. To be sure, the Picts had slaughtered a lot more than seventeen in their attack.
** In "Wolves Beyond the Border", the Pict shaman Zogar Sag is briefly jailed for mugging a merchant and stealing his liquors. He reacts by summoning a Swamp Devil [[spoiler: (actually his brother)]] and sending him to kill the merchant and the guards who arrested him. However, Conan stated that imprisoning a Pict is the worst offense you can make to him.
* The main cases of all three ''Literature/ProvostsDog'' books by Creator/TamoraPierce involve this:
** In ''Terrier,'' a slum-dweller thinks the neighbors are puttin' on airs with their one nice thing that they own (a necklace or an antique book, things like that). Response? Ransom and murder their children as the Shadow Snake! [[spoiler:Oh, and she murdered Tansy's child and nearly kills her husband because, as a child, Tansy used to steal bread from her.]]
** One of the minds behind the counterfeiting plot in ''Bloodhound'' [[spoiler:wanted revenge for a dishonorable discharge after he'd spent years as a loyal soldier--he only hit his officer because he was TheNeidermeyer]]. Clearly the best response is to ''overturn the country's entire economy''.
** In ''Mastiff'', [[spoiler:the mages don't like the King's proposed sales tax on magic supplies]]. So they abduct one of the child princes with plans to kill him, kill dozens of others along the way, and plot to overthrow the government.
* In the ''[[Literature/CircleOfMagic Battle Magic]]'' by the above author, TheEmperor of the Yanjing Empire is shown to be prone to this. He has a rose garden and the gardeners working on it burned just because a small patch of mold was found on one plant when he was showing it off to Briar and Rosethorn. The rose bush that had the mold escaped being burned because Rosethorn begged the emperor to give it to her as a present after she had healed it.



* In an example of disproportionately low retribution, the head inquisitor in the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' novels gives orders that result in a massacre and is sentenced to one week's kitchen duty.

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* ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'': In an example of disproportionately low ''low'' retribution, the head inquisitor in the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' novels Grand Inquisitor gives orders that result in a massacre and is sentenced to one week's kitchen duty.



* Literature/SisterhoodSeries by Creator/FernMichaels: Okay, some of the punishments the Vigilantes subject the villains to can be considered this. A notable instance is the book ''Vendetta'' in which the Vigilantes skin John Chai alive! Well, the story says caning, but caning and skinning someone alive are ''not'' the same thing. His crime was drunkenly committing a hit-and-run on Myra Rutledge's daughter Barbara Rutledge, killing her and her unborn child, and then getting away with it because he's the son of the ambassador of China and used DiplomaticImpunity without a qualm. The reason the punishment in ''Vendetta'' can be considered this trope is because the crime occurred in ''Weekend Warriors'', which is a few books back, and by then the reader will probably have forgotten the full impact of the crime.

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* Literature/SisterhoodSeries ''Literature/SisterhoodSeries'' by Creator/FernMichaels: Okay, some of the punishments the Vigilantes subject the villains to can be considered this. A notable instance is the book ''Vendetta'' in which the Vigilantes skin John Chai alive! Well, the story says caning, but caning and skinning someone alive are ''not'' the same thing. His crime was drunkenly committing a hit-and-run on Myra Rutledge's daughter Barbara Rutledge, killing her and her unborn child, and then getting away with it because he's the son of the ambassador of China and used DiplomaticImpunity without a qualm. The reason the punishment in ''Vendetta'' can be considered this trope is because the crime occurred in ''Weekend Warriors'', which is a few books back, and by then the reader will probably have forgotten the full impact of the crime.



* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has a number of examples.
** One of the first things we learn about Gregor Clegane is that he held his little brother's face to a burning brazier for playing with one of his old toys, scarring him for life.
** Petyr Baelish's kingdom-conquering is mostly due to a grudge he nurses from being rejected by his childhood sweetheart for a wealthier and more dashing man.
** The Lannisters are well known for their harsh retribution. A popular song, "The Rains of Castamere" was written about how they completely wiped out two noble houses for being disloyal.
*** In the first book, Tywin Lannister had an innkeeper hanged. Her crime? Owning the inn where his [[TheUnfavorite least favourite]] son Tyrion was kidnapped.
** The Freys have possibly the most shocking example: [[spoiler:After Robb Stark reneges on his wedding promise to House Frey, Lord Walder massacres Robb, his mother, most of his noble bannermen, and most of his army at the wedding feast of his uncle, thereafter called The Red Wedding.]]
*** Afterwards, just having the last name Frey is a crime punishable by DisproportionateRetribution among some groups. The Brotherhood Without Banners, led by Lady Stoneheart ([[spoiler:AKA undead Catelyn Stark]]), hangs any Frey they catch. Up in the North, Lord Wyman Manderly [[spoiler:(who lost a son at the Red Wedding), has three Freys who visited his court killed, baked into pies, and fed to their relatives at Winterfell. To [[LoopholeAbuse avoid breaking]] [[SacredHospitality guest right]] like the Freys did, he gives them horses as gifts to signify they're no longer under his protection]].
** Joffrey Baratheon/Lannister/Waters is also know for this trope, typically cutting everybody's heads off for any act of defiance or making them duel to the death. However, one of his biggest moments of douchery comes when he has Sansa Stark stripped naked and beaten bloody, ''in front of the entire court'', because her brother won a battle.
* ''Literature/SpocksWorld'': Ruin [[spoiler: T'Pring's]] happiness with [[spoiler: Stonn]] by driving said character's beloved to suicide? They'll force the entire planet to vote to secede from the Federation, which would either send Spock and his family into exile or else trap Spock on Vulcan forever, ending his heroic and legendary trek to the stars. It doesn't help that, much like the MisplacedRetribution trope spells out, [[spoiler: T'Pring]] is more responsible for what happened to [[spoiler: Stonn]] than Spock is.



* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** A minor character in ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' is trying to get to an EscapePod before the ship he's on self destructs. Two kids, Tash and Zak Arranda, who'd been on a pod leave it to help someone, then try to get back on, but the man thinks they're cutting in front of him. What does he do? Lock them in a storage closet, ''leaving them to die''. The ship does not actually explode, it was a false alarm, but that's ''harsh''.
** A race introduced by Creator/TimothyZahn in the ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'' duology have this as part of their legal code. The penalty for murder is death, life for life - either one who is guilty, or ten of his clan who are innocent. They use this to justify flattening a Bothan space station and further inflaming the political mess engulfing the New Republic.
** The Bothans themselves. A species had a single member slight the Bothan race, and in retaliation, they burned the homeworld, slaughtered every member of the species, erased records of them, and '''made them never have existed.'''



* ''Literature/TakeshiKovacs'' tends to do this kind of thing [[AxeCrazy at]] [[AntiHero least]] [[SociopathicSoldier once]] per book.
** In ''Altered Carbon'', he is placed into a torture program for 24 simulated hours by some PunchClockVillain technicians hired by the BigBad. After he escapes, he remembers a passage from his favorite author about making every struggle personal. He returns to the technicians' office and kills everyone who works there, then goes to a strip club that is tangentially related to the affair and massacres everyone working there as well. He melts the heads of everyone he kills, preventing them from being resurrected in a new body, as most people are after death. His rampage is considered outrageous by everyone who learns about it.
** In ''Broken Angels'' he massacres an entire troop of [[spoiler: Carrera's Wedge soldiers to avenge a friend despite only a few of them even being involved.]] And another character, revolutionary leader Kemp, nuked a city due to [[spoiler: Hand's manipulations.]]
** Sometime before ''Woken Furies'' Kovacs learned that his ex-girlfriend married a religious fanatic, had a daughter who was killed in an accident, then tried to resurrect her against her husband's religion. But the priests caught her, tortured her to death, and tossed her [[BodyBackupDrive cortical stack]] in the ocean, effectively killing her for good. Kovacs found her husband, dragged the names of the ones who dumped her stack out of him, tortured and killed them, then went on to slaughter everyone in their village who was an adult at the time and had their stacks put in animals used for pit fights. By the time the book starts he's making a bit of a dent in the faith's hierarchy.



* ''Literature/TortallUniverse'': The main cases of all three ''Literature/BekaCooper'' books involve this:
** In ''Terrier'', a slum-dweller thinks the neighbors are puttin' on airs with their one nice thing that they own (a necklace or an antique book, things like that). Response? Ransom and murder their children as the Shadow Snake! [[spoiler:Oh, and she murdered Tansy's child and nearly kills her husband because, as a child, Tansy used to steal bread from her.]]
** One of the minds behind the counterfeiting plot in ''Bloodhound'' [[spoiler:wanted revenge for a dishonorable discharge after he'd spent years as a loyal soldier--he only hit his officer because he was TheNeidermeyer]]. Clearly the best response is to ''overturn the country's entire economy''.
** In ''Mastiff'', [[spoiler:the mages don't like the King's proposed sales tax on magic supplies]]. So they abduct one of the child princes with plans to kill him, kill dozens of others along the way, and plot to overthrow the government.
* Creator/AndreiBelyanin's ''Literature/TsarGorokhsDetectiveAgency'': In ''The Plot of the Black Mass'', Nikita asks the German ambassador what the Russian people need to do in order to be as efficient, polite, and hard-working as the Germans. The ambassador cheerfully reveals the secret - daily public floggings for even slightest infractions (e.g. not having a clean enough house), or just as a warning. He points out that this also applies to children, but children get no more than 10 lashes a day. [[SarcasmMode The Germans are not animals, after all]]. When Nikita walks out on the street, he calls the ambassador a fascist in his head and tells him (mentally) to stuff his German efficiency where the sun don't shine. There are no mention of this in later novels, and Nikita and the ambassador are actually good friends.



* In the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series, [[StepfordSmiler Ashfur]] gets dumped by [[RebelliousPrincess Squirrelflight]] in favor of [[NumberTwo Brambleclaw]]. What does he do? [[spoiler: He ''tries to murder her father'', the Clan's ''leader'', and get Brambleclaw blamed for it; when that fails, he waits [[BestServedCold moons]] until he has the chance to try again, this time targeting her ''kits''.]] All because she picked his best friend instead of him.
** Long before that, [[BloodKnight Thistleclaw]] ordered his apprentice (who would grow up to be Tigerstar) to attack and almost kill a kit who had accidentally wandered into their territory. This DisproportionateRetribution was eventually met with more DisproportionateRetribution, as the kit was a very young [[AxCrazy Scourge]], who eventually disemboweled Tigerstar, after Tigerstar tried to give Scourge's followers orders.
** Don't forget [[AxeCrazy Scourge]] having [[ShrinkingViolet Violet]] nearly beaten to death because she dared to look for her missing brother.
* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': In Andy Hoare's ''Literature/WhiteScars'' novel ''Hunt for Voldorius'', Malya is chosen for Voldorius's equerry. They get her to obey by threatening to kill a hundred people every time she is disobedient.



* In Andy Hoare's ''Literature/WhiteScars'' novel ''Hunt for Voldorius'', Malya is chosen for Voldorius's equerry. They get her to obey by threatening to kill a hundred people every time she is disobedient.
* According to Creator/{{Aristotle}}, Greek {{Tragedy}} actually requires that the TragicHero suffer disproportionate retribution for his actions. Aristotle judged that it had to be this way because if the hero was innocent than he wouldn't get CharacterDevelopment and if he deserved his fate than it wouldn't be tragic.
* This is a recurring theme in Roald Dahl's books. Villains often suffer horrible punishments (often death) for their crimes, even if the crimes don't warrant it. (A lot of them are the type that WouldHurtAChild, but even so, what happens to a few of them is rather grim.)
** What happens to most of the kids in ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' qualifies. Their punishments were brought on by their flaws, but still rather excessive. Even though they all live and recover to some extent they have some unpleasant permanent changes. Violet, for example, is no longer inflated, but is still blue. Just for chewing gum.
** This is due to him as a child being sent to an sadist boarding school where the teachers beat him constantly. So almost always his books involve kids triumphing over evil adults.
* In ''The Burden of Evil'' by Creator/StrugatskyBrothers, a colony of hippies (called "flora" in text) is attacked by people of the town Tashlinsk, and its inhabitants beaten and arrested, simply because a few of them stole food in the town. A kind schoolteacher trying to stop the mayhem is killed.
** InUniverse we once get a painting named "Das Motorrad unter dem Fenster am Sonntagmorgen" ("A motobike under the window on Sunday morning"). The painting shows a a bedroom, in which a man in a nightgown runs towards the window, grenade in hand. The implication is that the motorbike woke the man up, and for this the man is going to blow up the bike along with the motorist. [[spoiler: the artist turns out to be UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler]]
* Literature/TheWindwaterPack Zephyr’s reaction when he encounters the coyote that killed his pups is to shred him quite literally. The only thing that saves the coyote's mate is that killing her would leave their son an orphan, like Zephyr himself was.
* This is part of the main plot to ''Literature/{{Misery}}.'' Annie rescues Paul, who she's a big fan of, but then becomes furious when she buys his latest book and finds out that he killed off her favorite character. Annie then threatens to kill Paul unless he writes a sequel to the book where the character is brought back to life. Many of the tortures Paul goes through fit this trope as well. Annie refuses to give Paul his painkillers for days and when she finally gives them to him, she forces him to wash them down with soapy water, all because she didn't like that he had swearing in the new book he was working on. Also, when Paul complains that one of the keys on his typewriter doesn't work, Annie cuts off his thumb with an electric knife.

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* In Andy Hoare's ''Literature/WhiteScars'' novel ''Hunt for Voldorius'', Malya is chosen for Voldorius's equerry. They get her to obey by threatening to kill a hundred people every time she is disobedient.
* According to Creator/{{Aristotle}}, Greek {{Tragedy}} actually requires that the TragicHero suffer disproportionate retribution for his actions. Aristotle judged that it had to be this way because if the hero was innocent than he wouldn't get CharacterDevelopment and if he deserved his fate than it wouldn't be tragic.
* This is a recurring theme in Roald Dahl's books. Villains often suffer horrible punishments (often death) for their crimes, even if the crimes don't warrant it. (A lot of them are the type that WouldHurtAChild, but even so, what happens to a few of them is rather grim.)
** What happens to most of the kids in ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' qualifies. Their punishments were brought on by their flaws, but still rather excessive. Even though they all live and recover to some extent they have some unpleasant permanent changes. Violet, for example, is no longer inflated, but is still blue. Just for chewing gum.
** This is due to him as a child being sent to an sadist boarding school where the teachers beat him constantly. So almost always his books involve kids triumphing over evil adults.
* In ''The Burden of Evil'' by Creator/StrugatskyBrothers, a colony of hippies (called "flora" in text) is attacked by people of the town Tashlinsk, and its inhabitants beaten and arrested, simply because a few of them stole food in the town. A kind schoolteacher trying to stop the mayhem is killed.
** InUniverse we once get a painting named "Das Motorrad unter dem Fenster am Sonntagmorgen" ("A motobike under the window on Sunday morning"). The painting shows a a bedroom, in which a man in a nightgown runs towards the window, grenade in hand. The implication is that the motorbike woke the man up, and for this the man is going to blow up the bike along with the motorist. [[spoiler: the artist turns out to be UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler]]
* Literature/TheWindwaterPack
''Literature/TheWindwaterPack'' Zephyr’s reaction when he encounters the coyote that killed his pups is to shred him quite literally. The only thing that saves the coyote's mate is that killing her would leave their son an orphan, like Zephyr himself was.
* This is part of the main plot to ''Literature/{{Misery}}.'' Annie rescues Paul, who she's a big fan of, but then becomes furious when she buys his latest book and finds out that he killed off her favorite character. Annie then threatens to kill Paul unless he writes a sequel to the book where the character is brought back to life. Many of the tortures Paul goes through fit this trope as well. Annie refuses to give Paul his painkillers for days and when she finally gives them to him, she forces him to wash them down with soapy water, all because she didn't like that he had swearing in the new book he was working on. Also, when Paul complains that one of the keys on his typewriter doesn't work, Annie cuts off his thumb with an electric knife.
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* In Creator/AndreiBelyanin's ''[[Literature/TsarGorokhsDetectiveAgency The Plot of the Black Mass]]'', Nikita asks the German ambassador what the Russian people need to do in order to be as efficient, polite, and hard-working as the Germans. The ambassador cheerfully reveals the secret - daily public floggings for even slightest infractions (e.g. not having a clean enough house), or just as a warning. He points out that this also applies to children, but children get no more than 10 lashes a day. [[SarcasmMode The Germans are not animals, after all]]. When Nikita walks out on the street, he calls the ambassador a fascist in his head and tells him (mentally) to stuff his German efficiency where the sun don't shine. There are no mention of this in later novels, and Nikita and the ambassador are actually good friends.
* The North Korean government has a policy of this according to ''Literature/TheAccusation''. Any accident or moment of bad judgement, no matter how small or justified, can be spun as treasonous.
** “Record of a Defection”: Il-cheol is banned from joining the Party, hindering any hope of advancement in his career and ostracizing him socially, because his ''father'' accidentally killed a crate of rice seedlings during the country’s transition to collective farming. Il-cheol's nephew Min-hyuk is likewise bullied and held back in school.
** "City of Specters": The local party secretary accuses Gyeong-hee of potential espionage based on her window curtain choices. [[spoiler: The family is ultimately [[DeadlyEuphemism "banished"]] because their infant son is frightened by posters of Karl Marx.]]
** "So Near, Yet So Far": [[spoiler: Myeong-chol goes to a prison camp for three weeks as punishment for traveling without a permit.]]
** "On Stage": Kyeong-hun lands in hot water for holding hands with a girl and (allegedly) drinking during the official mourning period for Kim Il-Sung's death. His friend Kim Suk-i's entire family is sent to a labor camp because her father stated that Kim Jong-il has a second wife.
** "The Red Mushroom": Ko Inshik is demoted and sent to work in a backwater farming town when it's discovered that his presumed dead brother is in fact alive and living in South Korea.

to:

* In Creator/AndreiBelyanin's ''[[Literature/TsarGorokhsDetectiveAgency The Plot of the Black Mass]]'', Nikita asks the German ambassador what the Russian people need to do in order to be as efficient, polite, and hard-working as the Germans. The ambassador cheerfully reveals the secret - daily public floggings for even slightest infractions (e.g. not having a clean enough house), or just as a warning. He points out that this also applies to children, but children get no more than 10 lashes a day. [[SarcasmMode The Germans are not animals, after all]]. When Nikita walks out on the street, he calls the ambassador a fascist in his head and tells him (mentally) to stuff his German efficiency where the sun don't shine. There are no mention of this in later novels, and Nikita and the ambassador are actually good friends.
* The North Korean government has a policy of this according to ''Literature/TheAccusation''. Any accident or moment of bad judgement, no matter how small or justified, can be spun as treasonous.
** “Record of a Defection”: Il-cheol is banned from joining the Party, hindering any hope of advancement in his career and ostracizing him socially, because his ''father'' accidentally killed a crate of rice seedlings during the country’s transition to collective farming. Il-cheol's nephew Min-hyuk is likewise bullied and held back in school.
** "City of Specters": The local party secretary accuses Gyeong-hee of potential espionage based on her window curtain choices. [[spoiler: The family is ultimately [[DeadlyEuphemism "banished"]] because their infant son is frightened by posters of Karl Marx.]]
** "So Near, Yet So Far": [[spoiler: Myeong-chol goes to a prison camp for three weeks as punishment for traveling without a permit.]]
** "On Stage": Kyeong-hun lands in hot water for holding hands with a girl and (allegedly) drinking during the official mourning period for Kim Il-Sung's death. His friend Kim Suk-i's entire family is sent to a labor camp because her father stated that Kim Jong-il has a second wife.
** "The Red Mushroom": Ko Inshik is demoted and sent to work in a backwater farming town when it's discovered that his presumed dead brother is in fact alive and living in South Korea.



to:

* The North Korean government has a policy of this according to ''Literature/TheAccusation''. Any accident or moment of bad judgement, no matter how small or justified, can be spun as treasonous.
** “Record of a Defection”: Il-cheol is banned from joining the Party, hindering any hope of advancement in his career and ostracizing him socially, because his ''father'' accidentally killed a crate of rice seedlings during the country’s transition to collective farming. Il-cheol's nephew Min-hyuk is likewise bullied and held back in school.
** "City of Specters": The local party secretary accuses Gyeong-hee of potential espionage based on her window curtain choices. [[spoiler: The family is ultimately [[DeadlyEuphemism "banished"]] because their infant son is frightened by posters of Karl Marx.]]
** "So Near, Yet So Far": [[spoiler: Myeong-chol goes to a prison camp for three weeks as punishment for traveling without a permit.]]
** "On Stage": Kyeong-hun lands in hot water for holding hands with a girl and (allegedly) drinking during the official mourning period for Kim Il-Sung's death. His friend Kim Suk-i's entire family is sent to a labor camp because her father stated that Kim Jong-il has a second wife.
** "The Red Mushroom": Ko Inshik is demoted and sent to work in a backwater farming town when it's discovered that his presumed dead brother is in fact alive and living in South Korea.

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