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* Building your own PC may not be particularly ''hard'' -- there's many tutorials on how to build one -- but it does require significantly more effort than just purchasing a pre-manufactured PC. But a custom-built PC is generally cheaper, you get your own choice of parts to put into the machine, you can upgrade individual parts as needed instead of having to purchase an entirely new machine, you're not at the mercy of the vendor or manufacturer of the entire PC if one part goes wrong, and you get the satisfaction of doing your PC tasks on something that you built yourself.
* PC Gaming can include the above problems with PC building, as well as includes needing to learn how to shop for compatible parts (can't socket a [=DDR3=] RAM chip into a [=DDR4=] slot, for example), needing to troubleshoot problems caused by conflicts in parts, mods, etc., and you'll need to routinely clean your rig in order to get the most out of it (and that's not getting into liquid cooling and overclocking). That said, there are many reasons why PC is generally considered superior to console gaming (such as {{Game Mod}}s, playing games at high graphical settings and resolutions, and being able to regularly brute force 60 FPS or higher).

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* Building your own PC:
** While building a
PC may not be particularly ''hard'' -- there's many tutorials on how to build one -- but it does require significantly more effort than just purchasing a pre-manufactured PC. But a custom-built PC is generally cheaper, you get your own choice of parts to put into the machine, you can upgrade individual parts as needed instead of having to purchase an entirely new machine, you're not at the mercy of the vendor or manufacturer of the entire PC if one part goes wrong, and you get the satisfaction of doing your PC tasks on something that you built yourself.
* ** Building a [=Mini-ITX=] PC. [=Mini-ITX=] is the smallest "off the shelf" motherboard standard available, and there are several scenarios where an ITX build is more practical, such as space constraints or wanting a "portable" LAN party system. However, building in an ITX chassis is more challenging than building in a standard ATX chassis. Because of the motherboard's small form factor, there is only one expansion slot, which in practically all gaming rigs will be taken up by a graphics card, and only support two memory modules, limiting expandability. Speaking of graphics cards, some ITX cases may not support long graphics cards, although many graphics card manufacturers do make short cards for these systems. An ITX system can run hotter than a similarly specced ATX system, meaning a better than stock cooling system and aggressive cable management is necessary.
**
PC Gaming can include the above problems with PC building, as well as includes needing to learn how to shop for compatible parts (can't socket a [=DDR3=] RAM chip into a [=DDR4=] slot, for example), needing to troubleshoot problems caused by conflicts in parts, mods, etc., and you'll need to routinely clean your rig in order to get the most out of it (and that's not getting into liquid cooling and overclocking). That said, there are many reasons why PC is generally considered superior to console gaming (such as {{Game Mod}}s, playing games at high graphical settings and resolutions, and being able to regularly brute force 60 FPS or higher).

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* Credits cards can, when misused, financially ruin someone for years to come. That said, when properly used, on top of adding versatility to your finances (credit now, pay later), having a good Credit Score is essential to a number of aspects of modern life.


* Like in the Driving Game example above, learning to drive a stick shift/manual transmission car in real life. Especially since most driving schools teach using automatic transmissions, and knowing how to drive a stick is no longer required in most driving exams. You ''will'' stall the vehicle, be subject to clunking (and thus think you're breaking the car) and forced to stay on top of what gear you're in at all times, as well as learning which speeds work best for what gears, not to mention learning how to ''quickly'' change gears. But once you master it, you're no longer restricted to only driving a certain type of vehicle, such as if you need to drive one in a pinch, and can own whatever you want. Also, for many first-time drivers, a used stick-shift either from a dealer or from parents or friends is all they can afford, and they get better gas mileage than automatic transmissions of the same make and model[[note]]This applies to countries where automatic transmissions are the norm. However even in those where manual ones are mandatory in driving schools, you ''will'' too screw up things the first time[[/note]].

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* Like in the Driving Game example above, back on the main page, learning to drive a stick shift/manual transmission car in real life. Especially since most driving schools teach using automatic transmissions, and knowing how to drive a stick is no longer required in most driving exams. You ''will'' stall the vehicle, be subject to clunking (and thus think you're breaking the car) and forced to stay on top of what gear you're in at all times, as well as learning which speeds work best for what gears, not to mention learning how to ''quickly'' change gears. But once you master it, you're no longer restricted to only driving a certain type of vehicle, such as if you need to drive one in a pinch, and can own whatever you want. Also, for many first-time drivers, a used stick-shift either from a dealer or from parents or friends is all they can afford, and they get better gas mileage than automatic transmissions of the same make and model[[note]]This applies to countries where automatic transmissions are the norm. However even in those where manual ones are mandatory in driving schools, you ''will'' too screw up things the first time[[/note]].


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



** The act of landing itself is deceptively quite hard. Contrast to taking off, which is basically go full (or nearly full) throttle and pitch up at a certain speed, landing requires precisely maintaining a certain descent speed and because the ground isn't going to go anywhere upon taking the weight of the aircraft, it's literally crashing the aircraft against the ground. Pilots really don't want the aircraft touching down at over 200 feet per minute, which is a bit over 2 miles per hour. While that may not sound like much, think about how much force your car can exert at that speed, then multiply it by up to nearly 300 times. On top of that, the plane needs to land in a specific way depending on the landing gear configuration. For the common tricycle style configuration, the plane need to land nose up ("landing flare") so that the initial weight is taken on the much beefier main landing gears. Or basically, the plane still needs to fall (gently!) while in a "climbing" angle. Doing the landing flare incorrectly could result in what's called Pilot Induced Oscillation, causing the plane to go up and from overcorrecting. And when you're doing this just feet above the runway...
* Open-source software, i.e. software where the code is publicly available for everyone to see. It may not be as full-featured as closed-source counterparts, but one of the biggest advantages for those with programming muscle is that if there's a problem with the software they're using, it's possible to pinpoint the exact lines of code that are causing the problem and bring it up for someone to fix. And for those who are even more skilled, they can ''fix the problems themselves'', or better yet, add new features to the software.
* In UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball, Total Football. All the outfield players can take the role of one another. It's extremely technically and physically demanding on them as they have to know how to play in every position, which is why no team has used it in its purest form since the 1970s. However, the teams that did use it pretty much dominated their eras.
* Freeboards are this compared to regular skateboards. They require a bit more balance, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igUxzsEmQN8 require mid-skate foot pivots]] to push on flat surfaces (being designed for use on slopes), and, being designed to be like Snowboards you ride on the street, require certain Snowboard-specific actions to make the most of them. That said, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mu4NntKDP0 here's a video with a proficient Freeboarder at work]]. That's on top of the fact that Freeboard skill is (relatively) easily transferable to Snowboarding if given the opportunity.

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** The act of landing itself is deceptively quite hard. Contrast to taking off, which is basically go full (or nearly full) throttle and pitch up at a certain speed, landing requires precisely maintaining a certain descent speed and because the ground isn't going to go anywhere upon taking the weight of the aircraft, it's literally crashing the aircraft against the ground. Pilots really don't want the aircraft touching down at over 200 feet per minute, which is a bit over 2 miles per hour. While that may not sound like much, think about how much force your car can exert at that speed, then multiply it by up to nearly 300 times. On top of that, the plane needs to land in a specific way depending on the landing gear configuration. For the common tricycle style configuration, the plane need to land nose up ("landing flare") so that the initial weight is taken on the much beefier main landing gears. Or basically, the plane still needs to fall (gently!) while in a "climbing" angle. Doing the landing flare incorrectly could result in what's called Pilot Induced Oscillation, causing the plane to go up and down from overcorrecting. And when you're doing this just feet above the runway...
* Open-source software, i.e. , software where the code is publicly available for everyone to see. It may not be as full-featured as closed-source counterparts, but one of the biggest advantages for those with programming muscle is that if there's a problem with the software they're using, it's possible to pinpoint the exact lines of code that are causing the problem and bring it up for someone to fix. And for those who are even more skilled, they can ''fix fix the problems themselves'', themselves, or better yet, add new features to the software.
* In UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball, Total Football. All the outfield players can take the role of one another. It's extremely technically and physically demanding on them them, as they have to know how to play in every position, which is why no team has used it in its purest form since the 1970s. However, the teams that did use it pretty much dominated their eras.
* Freeboards are this compared to regular skateboards. They require a bit more balance, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igUxzsEmQN8 require mid-skate foot pivots]] to push on flat surfaces (being designed for use on slopes), and, being designed to be like Snowboards snowboards you ride on the street, require certain Snowboard-specific snowboard-specific actions to make the most of them. That said, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mu4NntKDP0 here's a video with a proficient Freeboarder freeboarder at work]]. That's on top of the fact that Freeboard freeboard skill is (relatively) easily transferable to Snowboarding snowboarding if given the opportunity.


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



* Lifting free weights, as compared to using weight machines. With free weights it's more difficult to properly do the exercise and you a higher risk of injury, but when done properly you get much better results as it takes a far wider range of muscles to stabilize the weight during the exercises.
** Likewise, Strongman Training is this UpToEleven. Essentially, imagine exercising with Free Weights, but the Free Weights are irregular shapes (the front of cars, tires, and so on). That said, Strongman Training pays off in muscles that are both big and practical, and, in general, there's a reason for the name.

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* Lifting free weights, as compared to using weight machines. With free weights weights, it's more difficult to properly do the exercise exercise, and you a higher risk of injury, but when done properly properly, you get much better results results, as it takes a far wider range of muscles to stabilize the weight weights during the exercises.
** Likewise, Strongman Training is this UpToEleven. Essentially, imagine exercising with Free Weights, but the Free Weights are irregular shapes (the front fronts of cars, tires, and so on). That said, Strongman Training pays off in muscles that are both big and practical, and, in general, there's a reason for the name.


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



* Parallel parking, particularly between two cars, is significantly more difficult than more conventional perpendicular parking, to the point where in some jurisdictions, parallel parking isn't even on the license test. You might spend several minutes switching gears, potentially blocking traffic, or worse trade paint. But once mastered, you can pretty much park anywhere where there is legal parking space. While this has been made less difficult with newer cars having rear cameras, this trope is still in full force if your car doesn't have one.

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* Parallel parking, particularly between two cars, is significantly more difficult than more conventional perpendicular parking, to the point where in some jurisdictions, parallel parking isn't even on the license test. You might spend several minutes switching gears, potentially blocking traffic, or worse trade paint.worse, trading paint (hitting the other cars). But once mastered, you can pretty much park anywhere where there is legal parking space. While this has been made less difficult with newer cars having rear cameras, this trope is still in full force if your car doesn't have one.


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



* The development architecture of certain video game systems (the ''[=PS3=]'''s Cell Processor, and a number of ''Nintendo'' systems, to name some examples) are extremely arcane, and hard to use. That said, the Wii U had multiple games that stun even PC gamers with how beautiful they look (on top of a number of them running at 60 Frames Per Second, usually sacrificed for pretty visuals), and the ''[=PS3=]'' was, objectively, the most powerful system of it's generation.

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* The development architecture of certain video game systems (the ''[=PS3=]'''s Cell Processor, and a number of ''Nintendo'' systems, to name some examples) are extremely arcane, and hard to use. That said, the Wii U had multiple games that stun even PC gamers with how beautiful they look (on top of a number of them running at 60 Frames Per Second, usually sacrificed for pretty visuals), and the ''[=PS3=]'' was, objectively, the most powerful system of it's its generation.


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



** This is also true in off-road conditions; due to automatic transmissions using more electronic components, they can suffer corrosion from incoming objects like sand particle, rocks, and water. Manual transmissions survive longer due to electronic components being less frequent or (in older vehicles) non-existant, thus less prone to corrosion.

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** This is also true in off-road conditions; due to automatic transmissions using more electronic components, they can suffer corrosion from incoming objects like sand particle, rocks, and water. Manual transmissions survive longer due to electronic components being less frequent or (in older vehicles) non-existant, nonexistent, thus less prone to corrosion.


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



** 5th edition ramped the hell out of this with the Tau. They went from steep learning curve to learning cliff over night. However, if you can master them they're easily one of the most powerful factions in the game. However 6th edition buffed them up (due to being more shooter friendly) and their codex is less this (no useless units bluffing abilities everywhere) but still needs each part of the army to be aid each other.
** Some variations of Space Marine lists fall under this trope. A Space Marine biker list can be hard as hell to use effectively but when it is they are getting damn near close to GameBreaker territory.
*** The Space Marine Land Speeder. Fragile and many people write them off as garbage due to that, but in the hands of a competent player, they are quite nasty. What doesn't help its case is that many veteran players are aware of this and kill the speeder first.
** Deathwing and Paladin armies. Sure, everyone in your force has a power fist and the best armor possible, but at 1,500 points you'll seldom have more than thirty models on the table (compare to an Imperial Guard army that could potentially run two good-sized infantry platoons and assorted tanks at that points level). If you can manage to bring the full brunt of your force to bear on a segment of the enemy army, however, you'll probably roll over anything in your way.
*** Deathwing gained a mixed blessing thanks to their 6th Edition codex. They keep their old difficult play style, yet gain some new toys, such as Deathwing [[CripplingOverspecialization Knights]] who, with Belial in their unit, can easily obliterate [[TheDreaded Abaddon]] [[HeroKiller the]] [[DemonicSpiders Despoiler]] and 10 terminators SINGLE HANDEDLY. However, since these new toys often come with extra baggage (Deathwing Knights only get one turn to unleash their extreme melee prowess) they remain rather balanced.

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** 5th edition ramped the hell out of this with the Tau. They went from steep learning curve to learning cliff over night. However, if you can master them them, they're easily one of the most powerful factions in the game. However However, 6th edition buffed them up (due to being more shooter friendly) friendly), and their codex is less this (no useless units bluffing abilities everywhere) everywhere), but still needs each part of the army to be aid each other.
** Some variations of Space Marine lists fall under this trope. A Space Marine biker list can be hard as hell to use effectively effectively, but when it is is, they are getting get damn near close to GameBreaker territory.
*** The Space Marine Land Speeder. Fragile Fragile, and many people write them off as garbage due to that, but in the hands of a competent player, they are quite nasty. What doesn't help its case is that many veteran players are aware of this and kill the speeder first.
** Deathwing and Paladin armies. Sure, everyone in your force has a power fist and the best armor possible, but at 1,500 points you'll seldom have more than thirty models on the table (compare to an Imperial Guard army that could potentially run two good-sized infantry platoons and assorted tanks at that points point level). If you can manage to bring the full brunt of your force to bear on a segment of the enemy army, however, you'll probably roll over anything in your way.
*** Deathwing Deathwings gained a mixed blessing thanks to their 6th Edition codex. They keep their old old, difficult play style, yet gain some new toys, such as Deathwing [[CripplingOverspecialization Knights]] who, with Belial in their unit, can easily obliterate [[TheDreaded Abaddon]] [[HeroKiller the]] [[DemonicSpiders Despoiler]] and 10 terminators SINGLE HANDEDLY. SINGLEHANDEDLY. However, since these new toys often come with extra baggage (Deathwing Knights only get one turn to unleash their extreme melee prowess) prowess), they remain rather balanced.



** Many Armies have special rules that can change the course of a game, "Elite" Armies (all Elves, Chaos, Dwarves, Lizardmen) in particular often have multiple special rules for individual units or for the whole Army, and the high cost of units in such Armies require the player to think carefully about what they choose to field and know all the possible uses of the units they choose.

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** Many Armies have special rules that can change the course of a game, "Elite" Armies (all Elves, Chaos, Dwarves, Lizardmen) in particular often have multiple special rules for individual units or for the whole Army, and the high cost of units in such Armies require requires the player to think carefully about what they choose to field and know all the possible uses of the units they choose.



** The Controller example still stands true in 5e, but now it's the domain of Druids. Most first time Druid players will immediately begin to rely on Moon Druid Wildshaping to solve their problems (which sees the Druid spike in power dramatically as new forms become available and become reduntant and it only becomes a GameBreaker at [[EleventhHourSuperpower level 20]] when you have unlimited Wildshapes) and keep as far away from their control spells as possible due to the fact it doesn't offer immediate gratification the same way a Cleric's Cure Wounds or a Sorcerer's Cone of Cold does. Once they pick up the Land Druid and start utilising these spells, however, they can prevent the foe from ever touching the party, using the environment to utterly demolish foes, or just in general keep the foe fighting under their terms.
* In TabletopGame/{{chess}}, pawns are the least mobile piece in the game, as well as the only one that not only captures differently from how it moves but also has no less than two special moves. Because they are so difficult to move, however, the way they become arranged (called the "pawn structure") becomes one of the most important aspects of the board. Many professional games revolve around trying to put your pawns in a favorable position while screwing up your opponent's formations, and if you go all the way to the endgame, the focus becomes using what's left of your more powerful pieces to escort one or more of your pawns so that it can be promoted. [[note]]If you get a pawn to the end of an eight-square board, the pawn can become a queen, the strongest piece in the game. Technically, a pawn may be promoted to any piece except a king, but the queen, as the most powerful piece, is almost invariably chosen - unless that would cause stalemate, or a knight is needed for a checkmate.[[/note]] Pawn structure is subtle, however, and most casual players don't bother taking it into consideration.
* Anyone who wants to use light 'Mechs and other relatively fragile designs in ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'' will find that their units will generally go down with depressing ease, especially when playing in the later parts of the franchise (generally comprising of the Civil War, Jihad, and Dark Age timeframes) where highly damaging and highly accurate weapons are widely available. Some weapons are powerful enough to be a OneHitKill outright against small 'Mechs. However, a player with thorough knowledge of their unit abilities, enemy composition, and terrain can quickly became king of a frustrating FragileSpeedster army that refuses to stand still long enough to get hit, and can either deal DeathByAThousandCuts or go in for a critical BackStab. The rare commander with both cunning and utter madness can also avert MookChivalry and dogpile their light 'Mechs onto an enemy with a flurry of physical blows. While any individual attack isn't all that strong, the sheer number of them can quickly overwhelm even an Assault 'Mech, especially since getting kicked can make a 'Mech trip and fall, and a punch in the head is still every bit as dangerous as a fist from a 20-ton robot sounds. Finally, in games where players must meet on roughly even footing through a PointBuy system, the player with the light 'Mechs may purchase more units, as well as better pilots, due to the low individual cost of their units.

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** The Controller example still stands true in 5e, but now it's the domain of Druids. Most first time first-time Druid players will immediately begin to rely on Moon Druid Wildshaping to solve their problems (which sees the Druid spike in power dramatically as new forms become available and become reduntant and it only becomes a GameBreaker at [[EleventhHourSuperpower level 20]] when you have unlimited Wildshapes) and keep as far away from their control spells as possible due to the fact it doesn't offer immediate gratification the same way a Cleric's Cure Wounds or a Sorcerer's Cone of Cold does. Once they pick up the Land Druid and start utilising these spells, however, they can prevent the foe from ever touching the party, using the environment to utterly demolish foes, or just in general keep the foe fighting under their terms.
* In TabletopGame/{{chess}}, pawns are the least mobile piece in the game, as well as the only one that not only captures differently from how it moves but also has no less than two special moves. Because they are so difficult to move, however, the way they become arranged (called the "pawn structure") becomes one of the most important aspects of the board. Many professional games revolve around trying to put your pawns in a favorable position while screwing up your opponent's formations, and if you go all the way to the endgame, the focus becomes using what's left of your more powerful pieces to escort one or more of your pawns so that it can be promoted. [[note]]If you get a pawn to the end of an eight-square board, the pawn can become a queen, the strongest piece in the game. Technically, a pawn may be promoted to any piece except a king, king or pawn, but the queen, as the most powerful piece, is almost invariably chosen - unless that would cause stalemate, or a knight is needed for a checkmate.[[/note]] Pawn structure is subtle, however, and most casual players don't bother taking it into consideration.
* Anyone who wants to use light 'Mechs and other relatively fragile designs in ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'' will find that their units will generally go down with depressing ease, especially when playing in the later parts of the franchise (generally comprising of the Civil War, Jihad, and Dark Age timeframes) where highly damaging highly-damaging and highly accurate highly-accurate weapons are widely available. Some weapons are powerful enough to be a OneHitKill outright against small 'Mechs. However, a player with thorough knowledge of their unit abilities, enemy composition, and terrain can quickly became king of a frustrating FragileSpeedster army that refuses to stand still long enough to get hit, and can either deal DeathByAThousandCuts or go in for a critical BackStab. The rare commander with both cunning and utter madness can also avert MookChivalry and dogpile their light 'Mechs onto an enemy with a flurry of physical blows. While any individual attack isn't all that strong, the sheer number of them can quickly overwhelm even an Assault 'Mech, especially since getting kicked can make a 'Mech trip and fall, and a punch in the head is still every bit as dangerous as a fist from a 20-ton robot sounds. Finally, in games where players must meet on roughly even footing through a PointBuy system, the player with the light 'Mechs may purchase more units, as well as better pilots, due to the low individual cost of their units.



* Vampire teams in ''TabletopGame/BloodBowl'' feature LightningBruiser vampires, whose hypnotic gaze gives them a non-turnover-inducing way of stopping enemy players dead in their tracks for a round. If the dice favour you and you plan your thrall deployment, vampires are the best cage-busters in the game, are the only team that can shut down elven drives reliably, and can skill up to do practically everything, including a not-too-shabby passing game. With a few bad rolls, however, [[WarmBloodBagsAreEverywhere they can quickly become more disruptive to your plans than the opposing team ever will]].

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* Vampire teams in ''TabletopGame/BloodBowl'' feature LightningBruiser vampires, whose hypnotic gaze gives them a non-turnover-inducing way of stopping enemy players dead in their tracks for a round. If the dice favour you and you plan your thrall deployment, vampires are the best cage-busters in the game, are the only team that can shut down elven drives reliably, and can skill up to do practically everything, including a not-too-shabby passing game. With a few bad rolls, however, [[WarmBloodBagsAreEverywhere they can quickly become more disruptive to your plans than the opposing team ever will]].



** Captain Cosmic creates fragile mini-critters with a variety of activation triggers. These can achieve nothing, or they can utterly demolish the enemy without the Captain ever lifting a finger himself, depending on how effectively you use them. For example, Dynamic Siphon, when damaged but not destroyed, gives the hero it's attached to a chance to use a power. Against mass-damage enemies, like a Gene-Bound Psi-Weaver, this can allow the attached hero to use a damage-dealing power (for example, the power of Fanatic's sword, Absolution), killing the Psi-Weaver before it has a chance to do any more damage, or you can save it to last and use a mass heal, such as Tempest's Cleansing Downpour, to negate the Psi-Weaver's entire turn.

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** Captain Cosmic creates fragile mini-critters with a variety of activation triggers. These can achieve nothing, or they can utterly demolish the enemy without the Captain ever lifting a finger himself, depending on how effectively you use them. For example, Dynamic Siphon, when damaged but not destroyed, gives the hero it's attached to a chance to use a power. Against mass-damage enemies, like a Gene-Bound Psi-Weaver, this can allow the attached hero to use a damage-dealing power (for example, the power of Fanatic's sword, Absolution), killing the Psi-Weaver before it has a chance to do any more damage, or you can save it to for last and use a mass heal, such as Tempest's Cleansing Downpour, to negate the Psi-Weaver's entire turn.


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the graveyard. The deck is probably the best best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Space 1889}}'' has rules for invention, the more difficult ones are really hard to get. You have to foresake more immediately useful skills and focus your character development on scientific areas. After much effort, though your reward will be an earthquake machine or an invisibility device or gravity control. Mwahahahah!

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Space 1889}}'' has rules for invention, the more difficult ones are really hard to get. You have to foresake more immediately useful skills and focus your character development on scientific areas. After much effort, though though, your reward will be an earthquake machine machine, or an invisibility device device, or gravity control. Mwahahahah!


** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the deck's graveyard. The deck is probably the most egregious example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the said remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.
** The most complex deck in the game in terms of technical use, as opposed to situational control, is generally considered to be Doomsday. Doomsday is a combo deck that aims to use the card Doomsday to set up "piles" composed of any 5 cards in the game, and then use the pile created to win the game. The problem is that there are more than a thousand possible piles, and what pile to use is dependent on everything from how much life you are at, to what cards you have in hand, to what cards are on the field, in your opponent's hand or graveyard, what life your opponent is at, and many more factors. Creating the wrong pile means a lost game, using the right pile in the wrong way means a lost game, and even using the right pile in the right way at the wrong time means a lost game. The deck rarely shows up in competitive settings because of its complexity, and due to how meta dependent the deck is, but in the right hands the deck is the most resilient and most feared combo deck in the game.

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** Within [=MtG=], control decks are generally the most complex decks to play, with the best example being the blue/white Miracles deck in Legacy; the deck is known for simultaneously controlling the player's hand, the top cards of the player's deck, the top cards of the opponent's deck, the stack, the field, and the deck's graveyard. The deck is probably the most egregious best example over the course of the game, and a single mistake often leads to a lost game. That being said, the said deck remains more than 10% of the meta on its own, and is considered one of the strongest decks in the game format, at times the strongest deck.
** The most complex deck in the game in terms of technical use, as opposed to situational control, is generally considered to be Doomsday. Doomsday is a combo deck that aims to use the card Doomsday to set up "piles" composed of any 5 cards in the game, and then use the pile created to win the game. The problem is that there are more than a thousand possible piles, and what pile to use is dependent on everything from how much life you are at, to what cards you have in hand, to what cards are on the field, in your opponent's hand or graveyard, what life your opponent is at, and many more factors. Creating the wrong pile means a lost game, using the right pile in the wrong way means a lost game, and even using the right pile in the right way at the wrong time means a lost game. The deck rarely shows up in competitive settings because of its complexity, and due to how meta dependent meta-dependent the deck is, but in the right hands hands, the deck is the most resilient and most feared combo deck in the game.


** [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Sophia_the_Creator Sophia the Creator]] is considered this for having harsh summoning requirement of banishing one Fusion, one Ritual, one Synchro and one Xyz on the field. While it is a little lenient in that you can use the opponent's monsters for the summoning requirement, you still need the stars to align or to be playing a large mishmash of card types to pull it off. However, once it hits the field, ''all other cards on the field, graveyard and hand are banished except itself''. Not to mention its summon and effect cannot be negated.

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** [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Sophia_the_Creator Sophia the Creator]] Goddess of Rebirth]] is considered this for having the harsh summoning requirement of banishing one Fusion, one Ritual, one Synchro and one Xyz on the field. While it is a little lenient in that you can use the opponent's monsters for the summoning requirement, you still need the stars to align or to be playing a large mishmash of card types to pull it off. However, once it hits the field, ''all other cards on the field, graveyard and hand are banished except itself''. Not to mention its summon and effect cannot be negated.



** There are also some very powerful decks, that are extremely complicated to play properly. Both Inzectors and Inferties, for example, can stop your opponent from really doing anything, while you get out multiple huge beaters... but first, you pretty much have to play a game of solitaire.
** Decks utilizing Rank-Up-Magic to summon [[SuperMode CXyz and Chaos Numbers]] are this as well. For starters, you need a specific spell card (of which there is more than one of) and a particular Xyz monster (which have more than enough of, even of those specific ranks). What you do is bring out one of those Xyz monsters (such as Number 39: Utopia or Number 101: Silent Honor ARK) and then utilize the Rank-Up-Magic to make it into its "C" form (Utopia Ray V/Victory for Utopia, Silent Honor DARK for ARK). Such monsters tend to have powerful effects that requires a specific card to have as Xyz material to use. Difficult? Yes. Awesome? Seeing your opponent rage when they lose to something hard to use makes this an absolute '''YES'''.
** Any Level 10 or higher monster in general. Firstly, you need 2 Tributes to Normal Summon them (if you can Normal Summon them at all), and many have Summoning Restrictions applied to them; for example the aforementioned Sophia and Vennominaga. Second, many of them have massive downsides to using, or require many hoops to be jumped through to just have them on board. However, once you have them, they become massively awesome. One such monster is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Theinen_the_Great_Sphinx Theinen the Great Sphinx]], who required two other Level 10 monsters to be destroyed '''simultaneously''', before he could be Summoned from the Hand or Deck, at the cost of 500 Life Points. Then, you could spend an additional 500 LP to increase his already formidable attack power by 3000 points for the duration of the turn. Potentially, this could be a OneHitKill if your opponent had a low amount of LP to begin with, and has no cards to stop you.
** The D/D/D archetype from the Arc-v era was built around being able to effectively utilize every single available summoning mechanic of the era (except ritual summoning) as well as many effects that allow special summoning other monsters of their archetype. This means that you have a lot of options, need to very carefully craft the deck around the monsters that make these summons possible, and need to use each card carefully with little room for error. Though, once you master the deck, you have access to tons of options and can regularly pump out very powerful fields that simultaneously have very high attack power and powerful stun effects, such as (before link summoning was introduced) [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/D/D/D_Cursed_King_Siegfried D/D/D Cursed King Siegfried]], [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/Crystal_Wing_Synchro_Dragon Crystal Wing Synchro Dragon]], and [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/Number_38:_Hope_Harbinger_Dragon_Titanic_Galaxy Number 38: Hope Harbinger Dragon Titanic Galaxy]] all on one field.

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** There are also some very powerful decks, that are extremely complicated to play properly. Both Inzectors Inzektors and Inferties, Infernities, for example, can stop your opponent from really doing anything, while you get out multiple huge beaters... beaters...but first, you pretty much have to play a game of solitaire.
** Decks utilizing Rank-Up-Magic to summon [[SuperMode CXyz and Chaos Numbers]] are this as well. For starters, you need a specific spell card (of which there is more than one of) one) and a particular Xyz monster (which have there are more than enough of, even of those specific ranks). What you do is bring out one of those Xyz monsters (such as Number 39: Utopia or Number 101: Silent Honor ARK) and then utilize the Rank-Up-Magic to make it into its "C" form (Utopia Ray V/Victory for Utopia, Silent Honor DARK for ARK). Such monsters tend to have powerful effects that requires require a specific card to have as Xyz material to use. Difficult? Yes. Awesome? Seeing your opponent rage when they lose to something hard to use makes this an absolute '''YES'''.
** Any Level 10 or higher monster in general. Firstly, you need 2 Tributes to Normal Summon them (if you can Normal Summon them at all), and many have Summoning Restrictions applied to them; for example example, the aforementioned Sophia and Vennominaga. Second, many of them have massive downsides to using, using them, or require many hoops to be jumped through to just have them on board. However, once you have them, they become massively awesome. One such monster is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Theinen_the_Great_Sphinx Theinen the Great Sphinx]], who required two other Level 10 monsters to be destroyed '''simultaneously''', before he could be Summoned from the Hand or Deck, at the cost of 500 Life Points. Then, you could spend an additional 500 LP to increase his already formidable attack power by 3000 points for the duration of the turn. Potentially, this could be a OneHitKill if your opponent had a low amount of LP to begin with, and has had no cards to stop you.
** The D/D/D archetype from the Arc-v Arc-V era was built around being able to effectively utilize every single available summoning mechanic of the era (except ritual summoning) as well as many effects that allow special summoning other monsters of their archetype. This means that you have a lot of options, need to very carefully craft the deck around the monsters that make these summons possible, and need to use each card carefully with little room for error. Though, once you master the deck, you have access to tons of options and can regularly pump out very powerful fields that simultaneously have very high attack power and powerful stun effects, such as (before link summoning was introduced) [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/D/D/D_Cursed_King_Siegfried D/D/D Cursed King Siegfried]], [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/Crystal_Wing_Synchro_Dragon Crystal Wing Synchro Dragon]], and [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/Number_38:_Hope_Harbinger_Dragon_Titanic_Galaxy Number 38: Hope Harbinger Dragon Titanic Galaxy]] all on one field.


** The Koa'ki Meiru Archetype. Unlike any other Archetype in the game, Koa'ki Meirus require constant maintenance and resource management. Sure, you'll need monsters on the field to beat your opponent, but you also need to use the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Iron_Core_of_Koa%27ki_Meiru Iron Core of Koa'ki Meiru]] or another specific monster in hand to keep your monsters alive. Then, almost every single Spell and Trap also need the Iron Core to work - except sometimes, those need the Core in the ''Graveyard'' - meaning you won't be able to use them all unless you keep recycling the Core which will cost you resources. The Core on its own also does nothing, making for a terrible topdeck at the worst time. There's more - the Koa'ki Meirus also have powerful effects that can stop your opponent's moves, but to do so you will have to correctly predict ''what'' your opponent's going to do. And of course, your opponent is still trying to kill you. But damn it certainly pays off: Koa'ki Meiru monsters are absurdly strong, both ATK-wise and effect-wise, and their Spell and Trap Cards are free and unlimited versions of some of the strongest Spells and Traps in the game (like [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Koa%27ki_Meiru_Shield this]], which is basically [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Mirror_Force this]], one of the most popular Limited cards ever).
** Fableds have effects that activate upon being discarded, and effects that allow you to discard. [[note]]Similarly to the Dark World archetype, but with less of [[ThatOneRule the game's trademark obscure rulings]]. Sort of a Ryu and Ken thing going on here.[[/note]] But the gimmick is deceptively simple. Fabled users tend to have their turns go on for a while, partly because they're able to do an insane amount of things in one turn, partly because they have to spend so much time thinking their move through because of that. They can do so much crap, but unless you do the ''right'' crap, you'll be left with nothing but crap and your opponent will crap all over you.

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** The Koa'ki Meiru Archetype. Unlike any other Archetype in the game, Koa'ki Meirus require constant maintenance and resource management. Sure, you'll need monsters on the field to beat your opponent, but you also need to use the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Iron_Core_of_Koa%27ki_Meiru Iron Core of Koa'ki Meiru]] or another specific monster in hand to keep your monsters alive. Then, almost every single Spell and Trap also need needs the Iron Core to work - except sometimes, those need the Core in the ''Graveyard'' - meaning you won't be able to use them all unless you keep recycling the Core which will cost you resources. The Aldo, the Core on its own also does nothing, making for a terrible topdeck at the worst time. There's more - the Koa'ki Meirus also have powerful effects that can stop your opponent's moves, but to do so you will have to correctly predict ''what'' your opponent's going to do. And of course, your opponent is still trying to kill you. But damn it certainly pays off: Koa'ki Meiru monsters are absurdly strong, both ATK-wise and effect-wise, and their Spell and Trap Cards are free and unlimited versions of some of the strongest Spells and Traps in the game (like [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Koa%27ki_Meiru_Shield this]], which is basically [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Mirror_Force this]], one of the most popular Limited cards ever).
** Fableds have effects that activate upon being discarded, and effects that allow you to discard. [[note]]Similarly to the Dark World archetype, but with less of [[ThatOneRule the game's trademark obscure rulings]]. Sort of a Ryu and Ken thing going on here.[[/note]] But the gimmick is deceptively simple. Fabled users tend to have their turns go on for a while, partly because they're able to do an insane amount of things in one turn, partly because they have to spend so much time thinking their move through because of that. They can do so much crap, much, but unless you do the ''right'' crap, it ''right'', you'll be left with nothing but crap and your opponent will crap all over you.beat you down with little effort due to their relatively weak Main Deck monsters.


** Trafalgar Law's Devil Fruit was also revealed to be this in his backstory. The Op-Op fruit grants the ability to control everything within the "Rooms" generated by the user, and can be used to heal people. After eating it Law immediately tried to heal his father-figure Corazon...only to fail because he did not have the medical knowledge on how to fix the injuries. Law needed to actually ''learn medicine'' to be able to use his full power. Unlike all other Devil Fruits, it also has the drawback of sapping his stamina, so Law usually needs to plan for confrontations so he'll have enough energy. But if he does have that energy, he's capable of flipping battleships, cutting marines to bits and keeping them alive anyway, cutting through mountains, dealing blows that will destroy your organs form the inside out, and more.

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** Trafalgar Law's Devil Fruit was also revealed to be this in his backstory. The Op-Op fruit grants the ability to control everything within the "Rooms" generated by the user, and can be used to heal people. After eating it Law immediately tried to heal his father-figure Corazon...only to fail because he did not have the medical knowledge on how to fix the injuries. Law needed to actually ''learn medicine'' to be able to use his full power. Unlike all other Devil Fruits, it also has the drawback of sapping his stamina, so Law usually needs to plan for confrontations so he'll have enough energy. But if he does have that energy, he's capable of flipping battleships, cutting marines to bits and keeping them alive anyway, cutting through mountains, dealing blows that will destroy your organs form from the inside out, and more.

Added DiffLines:

Go back to DifficultButAwesome the hard way.

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