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* Right in the [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 fraking]] title. "The from Vinci Code" should be a red flag to Leonardo da Vinci studiers of the [[DanBrowned Dan Browning]] from the very title. ''[[AC: [[http://articles.sfgate.com/2003-08-30/entertainment/17504962_1_holy-grail-da-vinci-code-master-draftsman SF Gate Article]]]]''

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* Right in the [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 fraking]] title. "The from Vinci Code" should be a red flag to Leonardo da Vinci studiers of the [[DanBrowned Dan Browning]] from the very title. ''[[AC: [[http://articles.sfgate.com/2003-08-30/entertainment/17504962_1_holy-grail-da-vinci-code-master-draftsman SF Gate Article]]]]''

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*** What's more, plenty of people can memorize long strings of numbers. See also MouthfulOfPi.


* Japan's Seven Gods of Good Fortune (''Shichi-fukujin'') are misidentified as Shichigosan, which is not a deity or a grouop of deities, but a traditional rite of passage for children in Japan. [[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Lucky_Gods Wikipedia 1]]]]&[[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shichi-Go-San Wikipedia 2]]]]

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* Japan's Seven Gods of Good Fortune (''Shichi-fukujin'') are misidentified as Shichigosan, which is not a deity or a grouop group of deities, but a traditional rite of passage for children in Japan. [[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Lucky_Gods Wikipedia 1]]]]&[[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shichi-Go-San Wikipedia 2]]]]


* Japan's Seven Gods of Good Fortune (''Shichi-fukujin'') are misidentified as Shichigosan, which is something completely different. [[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Lucky_Gods Wikipedia 1]]]]&[[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shichi-Go-San Wikipedia 2]]]]

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* Japan's Seven Gods of Good Fortune (''Shichi-fukujin'') are misidentified as Shichigosan, which is something completely different.not a deity or a grouop of deities, but a traditional rite of passage for children in Japan. [[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Lucky_Gods Wikipedia 1]]]]&[[AC:[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shichi-Go-San Wikipedia 2]]]]



* What about that ''monk'' from Opus Dei? Opus Dei was specifically founded for people who live "in the world", in other words, people who ''aren't'' members of religious orders. An Opus Dei monk would be literally an OxymoronicBeing. (They do have numeraries, that is, celibate members whose concept might look like monks to outsiders, but not literal monks. Oddly, Dan Brown mentions numeraries in the book, meaning he managed to confuse even a notion that should dispel this very confusion.)

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* What about that ''monk'' from Opus Dei? Opus Dei was specifically founded for people who live "in the world", in other words, people who ''aren't'' members of religious orders. An Opus Dei monk would be literally an OxymoronicBeing. (They They do have numeraries, that is, celibate members whose concept might look like monks to outsiders, but not literal monks. Oddly, (Oddly, Dan Brown actually mentions numeraries in the book, meaning he managed to confuse even a notion that should dispel this very confusion.)



* Constantine the Great and the First Council of Nicea in AD 325 had nothing to do with making Christianity the official religion in the Roman Empire. Constantine simply legalized it as a religion, and the Council decided on questions like the divinity of Christ. It was Emperor Theodosius I, 55 years later, in [=AD=] 380 who declared Christianity to be the state religion.[[note]]This was because Theodosius was beaten to the punch by King Trdat of Armenia and King Ezana of Ethiopia, who proclaimed Christianity the official religion of their realms in 314 and 333 respectively[[/note]]

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* Constantine the Great and the First Council of Nicea in AD 325 had nothing to do with making Christianity the official religion in the Roman Empire. Constantine simply legalized gathered the Council in order to formalize the Christian theology and formalize it as a religion, religion of the empire, and the Council decided mainly on questions topics like the divinity date of Christ.Easter, the structure of the Church and what to do with the Arian and Meletian heresies. It was Emperor Theodosius I, 55 years later, in [=AD=] 380 who declared Christianity to be the state religion.[[note]]This was because Theodosius was beaten to the punch by King Trdat of Armenia and King Ezana of Ethiopia, who proclaimed Christianity the official religion of their realms in 314 and 333 respectively[[/note]]



* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion" or "partner", those are very wide terms that do not necessarily imply they were married or together in any way. (There is also a passage where it is stated he loved her more than the rest of his disciples, but the same is stated about John in the Biblical canon.) Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether; thus, while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''

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* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion" or "partner", those are very wide terms that do not necessarily imply they were married or together in any way. way, unlike what Teabing and Langdon state. (There is also a passage where it is stated he loved her more than the rest of his disciples, but the same is stated about John in the Biblical canon.canon, so kind of a moot point.) Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether; thus, while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''



* Teabing and Langdon explain that English is the preferred mode of communication by the Priory of Sion as it is the "Lingua Pura", the pure tongue, the only European language unadulterated by the Papist Latin. While there really is no European language that was not influenced by Latin to some degree, the choice of English is particularly stupid. Although it is admittedly a Germanic language (whereas the Romance languages are descended from Latin), it borrowed heavily from French (a Latin-derived language) due to the Norman Conquest, and later from Latin directly during the Renaissance. There is really no reason for the Priory to communicate in English when there are so many other languages that fit the criteria better like Russian, Turkish, Arabic, Hebrew, or Greek (all of which Renaissance scholars, but obviously not Brown, were very familiar with, particularly Arabic,[[note]]From the thriving Italian trade with the Middle East[[/note]] Hebrew,[[note]]From Biblical study[[/note]] and most especially Greek[[note]]From Biblical and Classical studies[[/note]]). '''The Real History Behind the Da Vinci Code'''

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* Teabing and Langdon explain that English is the preferred mode of communication by the Priory of Sion as it is the "Lingua Pura", the pure tongue, the only European language unadulterated by the Papist Latin. While In reality, there really is no European language that was not influenced by Latin to some degree, and the choice of English is particularly stupid. Although it is admittedly a Germanic language (whereas the Romance languages are descended from Latin), it borrowed heavily from French (a Latin-derived language) due to the Norman Conquest, and later from Latin directly during the Renaissance. There is really no reason for the Priory to communicate in English when there are so many other languages that fit the criteria better like Russian, Turkish, Arabic, Hebrew, or Greek (all of which Renaissance scholars, but obviously not Brown, were very familiar with, particularly Arabic,[[note]]From the thriving Italian trade with the Middle East[[/note]] Hebrew,[[note]]From Biblical study[[/note]] and most especially Greek[[note]]From Biblical and Classical studies[[/note]]). '''The Real History Behind the Da Vinci Code'''



* The World Health Organization exists, but it is nothing like the NGOSuperpower it is portrayed as in the book. In reality the WHO has very limited funding, with member state contributions only covering 30% of the organization's budget: ''[[AC:[[https://tidsskriftet.no/en/2018/01/kronikk/challenges-world-health-organization Tidsskriftet]]]]''

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* The World Health Organization exists, but it is nothing like the NGOSuperpower it is portrayed as in the book. In reality reality, the WHO has very limited funding, with member state contributions only covering 30% of the organization's budget: ''[[AC:[[https://tidsskriftet.no/en/2018/01/kronikk/challenges-world-health-organization Tidsskriftet]]]]''


** It was fixed in some of the translations of the novel, such as Bulgarian, Czech, and Polish, all of which included the name Leonardo in their titles. The Polish translation goes) replaced basically all of the "Da Vincis" found throughout the novel with the much more accurate "Leonardo's."

to:

** It was fixed in some of the translations of the novel, such as Bulgarian, Czech, and Polish, all of which included the name Leonardo in their titles. The Polish translation goes) replaced basically all of the "Da Vincis" Vinci"s found throughout the novel with the much more accurate "Leonardo's.""Leonardo"s.


** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the university deny this, Brown also gets his art gistory wrong every single time in the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th; and the Giralda's dangerous steps constitute a critical plot point despite the real building being notorious for not having any steps, only ramps. Digging deeper in the wound, Brown repeats his "I studied Art History in Seville" story in the foreword of the Spanish version and claims that Seville is one of his favorite cities in the world before proceeding to rip it to shreds in the actual novel.

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** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the university deny this, Brown also gets his art gistory history wrong every single time in the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th; and the Giralda's dangerous steps constitute a critical plot point despite the real building being notorious for not having any steps, only ramps. Digging deeper in the wound, Brown repeats his "I studied Art History in Seville" story in the foreword of the Spanish version and claims that Seville is one of his favorite cities in the world before proceeding to rip it to shreds in the actual novel.


** This one was simply insulting: Brown portrayed the Spanish health care system as useless and incompetent; in fact, it is ranked 7th in the World by the WHO (for comparison, the USA's is ''37th'').
** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University deny this, Brown also gets his Art History wrong every single time in the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th; and the Giralda's dangerous steps constitute a critical plot point despite the real building being notorious for not having any steps, only ramps. Digging deeper in the wound, Brown repeats his "I studied Art History in Seville" story in the Foreword of the Spanish version and claims that Seville is one of his favorite cities in the world before proceeding to rip it to shreds in the actual novel.
** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it retains its five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use to save money, and the same drivers who don't care to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if the passengers fall off and break two legs and an arm so they keep driving at racing speed regardless of traffic and Seville streets being described as twisted little alleys elsewhere in the book]]. The setting is just one logic bomb like that after another.

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** This one was simply insulting: Brown portrayed the Spanish health care system as useless and incompetent; incompetent, when in fact, it is ranked 7th in the World world by the WHO (for comparison, the USA's is ''37th'').
** The whole issue is summed up by Brown's claim that he studied Art History in the University of Seville for a year. Not only does the University university deny this, Brown also gets his Art History art gistory wrong every single time in the book. The 15th century cathedral is said to be from the 11th century and to have only one door (and another little, hidden one), when it actually has seven; the 10th century Alcazar is said to be from the 15th; and the Giralda's dangerous steps constitute a critical plot point despite the real building being notorious for not having any steps, only ramps. Digging deeper in the wound, Brown repeats his "I studied Art History in Seville" story in the Foreword foreword of the Spanish version and claims that Seville is one of his favorite cities in the world before proceeding to rip it to shreds in the actual novel.
** The main character rents a room in Hotel Alfonso XIII, "a little four-star hotel." The real thing was built in 1928 with the express aim of ''being the most luxurious hotel in Europe,'' and it still retains its a five-star rating. When coupled with the mention of tourist-trap Triana neighborhood as a crime-ridden WretchedHive full of prostitutes and drug dealers, it is obvious that Brown is simply borrowing the names from a tourism brochure (probably printed for the 1992 World Exposition, given the continuous references to Columbus and the New World) and trying so really, really hard to make everything dangerous that it becomes an unintended parody instead. Spanish buses? They are dangerous because they drive around with the gates open. Why? To cool patients without having to turn on the air cooling system to save money. [[FridgeLogic So money is invested in making buses with air cooling systems in the first place but that are never put to use to save money, and the same drivers who don't care to turn it for the benefit of their passengers do care enough about them getting too hot to open the gates, but they don't care if the passengers fall off and break two legs and an arm so they keep driving at racing speed regardless of traffic and Seville streets being described as twisted little alleys elsewhere in the book]]. The setting is just one logic bomb like that after another.



* It's a major plot point that the NSA's (fictional) supercomputer cannot decrypt a particular ciphertext which it received recently. This is taken as absolute proof that the ciphertext was encrypted with some sort of Ultimate Encryption Technique which is tough enough to beat the supercomputer. Absolutely no one mentions the obvious alternative: the supposed ciphertext is simply ''random data'', and it can't be decrypted simply because it's ''random'' and therefore ''it contains no actual information''.

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* It's a major plot point that the NSA's (fictional) supercomputer cannot decrypt a particular ciphertext which it received recently. This is taken as absolute proof that the ciphertext was encrypted with some sort of Ultimate Encryption Technique ultimate encryption technique which is tough enough to beat the supercomputer. Absolutely no one mentions the obvious alternative: the supposed ciphertext is simply ''random data'', and it can't be decrypted simply because it's ''random'' and therefore ''it contains no actual information''.



** It was fixed in some of the translations of the novel, such as Bulgarian, Czech, and Polish, all of which included the name Leonardo in their titles. The Polish translation goes) replaced basically all of the "Da Vincis" found throughout the novel with the much more accurate "Leonardos."

to:

** It was fixed in some of the translations of the novel, such as Bulgarian, Czech, and Polish, all of which included the name Leonardo in their titles. The Polish translation goes) replaced basically all of the "Da Vincis" found throughout the novel with the much more accurate "Leonardos."Leonardo's."



* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion" or "partner", those are very wide terms that do not necessarily imply they were married or together in any way. (There is also a passage where it is stated he loves her more than the rest of his disciples, but the same is stated about John in the Biblical canon.) Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether; thus, while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''

to:

* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion" or "partner", those are very wide terms that do not necessarily imply they were married or together in any way. (There is also a passage where it is stated he loves loved her more than the rest of his disciples, but the same is stated about John in the Biblical canon.) Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether; thus, while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''


Moreover, anything about [[ArtisticLicenseReligion religious inaccuracies]] will not be represented on this page, due to a) Literature/TheBible being a work with wide interpretations, and b) RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement, unless it 1) directly contradicts one of the few indisputable things about the Bible (e.g. the text of a passage) or 2) makes clearly false claims about the doctrines of a particular sect (e.g. claims regarding Catholic theology unsupported by anything in Catholic literature).

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Moreover, anything about [[ArtisticLicenseReligion religious inaccuracies]] will not be represented on this page, due to a) Literature/TheBible being a work with wide interpretations, and b) RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement, Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement, unless it 1) directly contradicts one of the few indisputable things about the Bible (e.g. the text of a passage) or 2) makes clearly false claims about the doctrines of a particular sect (e.g. claims regarding Catholic theology unsupported by anything in Catholic literature).

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* TabletopGame/IlluminatiNewWorldOrder is a collectible card game, not a computer game, and Steve Jackson Games is not a computer game company. While the Bavarian Illuminati are a group in the game, the "Bavarian" bit is not in the title. There is not an option to play the game over the internet in standard rules, though some fans have come up with this option on their own. While the players can destroy other groups or individuals, "points" are not given for their destruction. "Vatican City" can be controlled or destroyed in the game, but "The Pope" is not one of the cards.


* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion" or "partner", those are very wide terms that do not necessarily imply they were married or together in any way. Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether; while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''

to:

* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion" or "partner", those are very wide terms that do not necessarily imply they were married or together in any way. (There is also a passage where it is stated he loves her more than the rest of his disciples, but the same is stated about John in the Biblical canon.) Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether; thus, while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''



* According to the book, the Dead Sea Scrolls contain Christian gospels. They are actually of Jewish origin, contain no Christian texts whatsoever (one fragment was theorized to be from Mark, but this was later disproven), and most of the non-Torah and related texts are general sectarian rules (the ones behind the Dead Sea Scrolls are most often thought to be the Essene sect) ''[[AC: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Sea_Scrolls Wikipedia]]]]''

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* According to the book, the Dead Sea Scrolls contain Christian gospels. They are actually of Jewish origin, This is untrue, as they contain no Christian texts whatsoever (one fragment was theorized to be from Mark, but this was later disproven), and most disproven). Most of the non-Torah and related Nag Hammadi scrolls are Jewish studies on the Torah, Gnostic texts are general of several kinds, and other sectarian rules (the ones behind the Dead Sea Scrolls are rules, most often thought to be of the Essene sect) sect. ''[[AC: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Sea_Scrolls Wikipedia]]]]''


* Brown claims that counting the number of hands in "The Last Supper" leads to the discovery of a disembodied hand holding a knife. However, this hand clearly belongs to Peter. It being pointed away from Jesus is thought to symbolize Peter's willingness to defend Jesus; indeed, in the Gospels, Peter cuts off somebody's ear during Jesus's arrest (and Jesus puts it right back on).

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* Brown claims that counting the number of hands in "The Last Supper" leads to the discovery of a disembodied hand holding a knife. However, it has been clarified this hand clearly belongs to Peter. It being pointed away from Jesus is thought to symbolize Peter's willingness to defend Jesus; indeed, in the Gospels, Peter cuts off somebody's ear during Jesus's arrest (and Jesus puts it right back on).



* Brown is also responsible for a false meme which has spread throughout popular culture: that the 325 Council of Nicaea "set" the Biblical canon, the books which are considered official scripture (according to Brown, thereby suppressing those Gospels that contained the "truth" about Jesus' descendants yadda yadda yadda). In fact, Nicaea had ''absolutely nothing'' to say about the canon; on the one hand the four Gospels had been agreed upon as the only legitimate ones as early as 175 and the other 23 books were universally recognized by the mid-3rd century.[[note]]In the Latin West; it was another two centuries before the Eastern Church recognized Revelation[[/note]] on the other hand no Council officially decreed the canon as set until that of Trent in 1546 -- ''after Leonardo's death.''
* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion", this is actually a very wide term and it does not necessarily imply a sexual relationship. Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether. While Gnostics would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''
* The idea that papyrus could easily be destroyed by vinegar. Papyrus is sturdy enough to hold itself together for 2-3 millennia. A few drops of vinegar would just make some stains.
* Teabing and Langdon explain that English is the preferred mode of communication by the Priory of Sion as it is the "Lingua Pura", the pure tongue, the only European language unadulterated by the Papist Latin. While there really is no European language that was not influenced by Latin to some degree, the choice of English is particularly stupid. While it is a Germanic language (whereas the Romance languages are descended from Latin), it has borrowed heavily from French (a Latin-derived language) due to the Norman Conquest, and later from Latin directly during the Renaissance. There is really no reason for the Priory to communicate in English when there are so many other languages that fit the criteria better like Russian, Turkish, Arabic, Hebrew, or Greek (all of which Renaissance scholars, but obviously not Brown, were very familiar with, particularly Arabic,[[note]]From the thriving Italian trade with the Middle East[[/note]] Hebrew,[[note]]From Biblical study[[/note]] and most especially Greek[[note]]From Biblical and Classical studies[[/note]]). '''The Real History Behind the Da Vinci Code'''

to:

* Brown is also responsible for a false meme which has spread throughout popular culture: that the 325 Council of Nicaea "set" the Biblical canon, the books which are considered official scripture (according to Brown, thereby suppressing those Gospels that contained the "truth" about Jesus' descendants yadda yadda yadda). In fact, Nicaea had ''absolutely nothing'' to say about the canon; on canon. On the one hand hand, the four Gospels had been agreed upon as the only legitimate ones as early as 175 175, and the other 23 books were universally recognized by the mid-3rd century.[[note]]In [[note]]At least in the Latin West; it was another two centuries before the Eastern Church recognized Revelation[[/note]] on On the other hand hand, no Council officially decreed the canon as set until that of Trent in 1546 -- ''after Leonardo's death.''
* Brown cites the [[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnostic Gospel of Philip]] as saying that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married. The text actually says no such thing; while it does say Mary Magdalene had special insight into Jesus's teachings and she is referred rather suggestively to as Jesus's "companion", this is actually a "companion" or "partner", those are very wide term and it does terms that do not necessarily imply a sexual relationship. they were married or together in any way. Interestingly, Gnostics were extremely ''against'' carnal relationships and advocated celibacy even more than mainstream Christians, sometimes to the extent of banning marriage and/or breeding altogether. While Gnostics altogether; while they would have been okay with Jesus having a romantic relationship, the idea of Jesus producing offspring would have been actually much more offensive to them than it is to Catholicism. ''[[AC: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Philip Wikipedia]]]]''
* The idea that papyrus could easily be destroyed by vinegar. Papyrus is sturdy enough to hold itself together for 2-3 millennia. A millennia, so a few drops of vinegar would just make some stains.
* Teabing and Langdon explain that English is the preferred mode of communication by the Priory of Sion as it is the "Lingua Pura", the pure tongue, the only European language unadulterated by the Papist Latin. While there really is no European language that was not influenced by Latin to some degree, the choice of English is particularly stupid. While Although it is admittedly a Germanic language (whereas the Romance languages are descended from Latin), it has borrowed heavily from French (a Latin-derived language) due to the Norman Conquest, and later from Latin directly during the Renaissance. There is really no reason for the Priory to communicate in English when there are so many other languages that fit the criteria better like Russian, Turkish, Arabic, Hebrew, or Greek (all of which Renaissance scholars, but obviously not Brown, were very familiar with, particularly Arabic,[[note]]From the thriving Italian trade with the Middle East[[/note]] Hebrew,[[note]]From Biblical study[[/note]] and most especially Greek[[note]]From Biblical and Classical studies[[/note]]). '''The Real History Behind the Da Vinci Code'''


* The World Health Organization exists, but it is nothing like the NGOSuperpower it is portrayed as in the book. The RL head of the WHO at the time wrote a review of Inferno that boiled down to "I wish I had half the funding and influence that Dan Brown thinks I do."

to:

* The World Health Organization exists, but it is nothing like the NGOSuperpower it is portrayed as in the book. The RL head of In reality the WHO at has very limited funding, with member state contributions only covering 30% of the time wrote a review of Inferno that boiled down to "I wish I had half the funding and influence that Dan Brown thinks I do."organization's budget: ''[[AC:[[https://tidsskriftet.no/en/2018/01/kronikk/challenges-world-health-organization Tidsskriftet]]]]''


* The World Health Organization exists, but it is nothing like the [[NGOSuperpower N.G.O. Superpower]] it is portrayed as in the book. The RL head of the WHO at the time wrote a review of Inferno that boiled down to "I wish I had half the funding and influence that Dan Brown thinks I do."

to:

* The World Health Organization exists, but it is nothing like the [[NGOSuperpower N.G.O. Superpower]] NGOSuperpower it is portrayed as in the book. The RL head of the WHO at the time wrote a review of Inferno that boiled down to "I wish I had half the funding and influence that Dan Brown thinks I do."


* While there is a World Health Organization, it is nothing like it is portrayed the book. The RL head of the WHO at the time wrote a review of Inferno that boiled down to "I wish I had half the funding and influence that Dan Brown thinks I do."

to:

* While there is a The World Health Organization, Organization exists, but it is nothing like the [[NGOSuperpower N.G.O. Superpower]] it is portrayed as in the book. The RL head of the WHO at the time wrote a review of Inferno that boiled down to "I wish I had half the funding and influence that Dan Brown thinks I do."


* According to the book, the Dead Sea Scrolls contain Christian gospels. In reality, the Scrolls contain Jewish and Gnostic texts, but not Christian ones. (It was believed for a time that they contained part of the Christian Gospel of Mark, but this was later proven wrong.) ''[[AC: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Sea_Scrolls Wikipedia]]]]''

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* According to the book, the Dead Sea Scrolls contain Christian gospels. In reality, the Scrolls They are actually of Jewish origin, contain Jewish and Gnostic texts, but not no Christian ones. (It texts whatsoever (one fragment was believed for a time that they contained part of the Christian Gospel of theorized to be from Mark, but this was later proven wrong.) disproven), and most of the non-Torah and related texts are general sectarian rules (the ones behind the Dead Sea Scrolls are most often thought to be the Essene sect) ''[[AC: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Sea_Scrolls Wikipedia]]]]''

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